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I'm thinking about how to structure the database tables on my Ruby on Rails app. It's an app that will allow academic surveys to be sent to a student population. But as I haven't had a lot of experience with database design, I don't know the answer to the following:

Which of the following should my tables look like?

Survey
  ID
  questions (has_many)
  etc...

Questions
  ID
  question (string)
  response (has_many)

Answers
  ID
  questions (belongs_to)
  response-text (string)

or...

Survey
  ID
  questions (has_many)
  etc...

Questions
  ID
  question (string)
  responses (string, or hash, or something. Don't even know if this is possible.)

Or should I do something completely different?

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1 Answer 1

surveys have questions. questions have answers

Survey
  has_many :questions
  has_many :answers, :through => :questions
end

Question
  belongs_to :survey
  has_many :answers
end

Answer
  belongs_to :question
end
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So then it's OK to have a table just with just one column? (or 4, really, but only one used practically) –  Brian Hicks Aug 30 '10 at 19:50
    
Given that you don't opt out, tables usually get id, created_at, modified_at column. belongs_to means the table gets association_id column. Apart from that if that were me, Survey would have a name, question text and answer text minimally. All in all much more than just one column table. –  Hugo Aug 30 '10 at 20:22
    
you dont define the columns in the activerecord model classes. you define the relationships. in order to hook up the above ar classes, you need to have a survey_id column on the question table, and a question_id on the answer table. the other data attributes will be evident as you build your app. –  Jed Schneider Aug 31 '10 at 10:31

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