Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a piece of code which uses Boost threads to speed up the calculation, but I need to debug it and want to run them in series, not in parallel. How do I do that?

share|improve this question
3  
Err.. just don't start the intended subroutine via threading. –  Billy ONeal Aug 30 '10 at 21:55
    
For the more general issue: How to detect and debug multi-threading problems? –  Philip Potter Aug 30 '10 at 22:15
3  
Your keyboard driver has a threading race problem. –  Hans Passant Aug 30 '10 at 22:37

5 Answers 5

Unless I'm missing something, just debug it using a single thread. Forget about multi-threading unless you get the algorithm right.

share|improve this answer

Assuming you meant "to speed up the calculation", threads running in series will not help performance at all. Actually, it would cost you performance for the overhead on the threads, because you're not parallelizing any work.

If you're so inclined to run them in series, just make sure each one waits for the current thread to finish executing before allowing another to run? I'm probably missing something here.

share|improve this answer
3  
He wants the threads running in series to make debugging easier. Hence the "but i need to debug it and want to run them in series" part of his first sentence. It's safe to assume he'll want re-enable parallel threads later after fixing the bugs. –  Emile Cormier Aug 30 '10 at 22:47
    
Exactly what I meant. Thank you, Emile. –  gt6989b Sep 1 '10 at 12:38

You can create a semaphore for each thread, and then signal the 1st semaphore in the main thread, and each thread can signal the next semaphore at its end.

But, still, why do you need to debug your app this way? It is very useful to debug the app with all threads running so that you can see if any race conditions happen, or anything like that.

share|improve this answer
    
I was wondering if you could use a simple system call forcing it to run in 1 thread, like MSalters proposed below. –  gt6989b Sep 1 '10 at 12:39
    
Well, in that case, just set breakpoints all over. It'll give you that kind of experience. –  Gianni Sep 1 '10 at 20:25

Put breakpoints in all your threads. Your debugger should have a command to step through or start just one thread. The rest of your threads will remain suspended, so they won't interfere with your single-threaded debugging. Once the one thread terminates, you can resume all the threads, or you can continue debugging in the next thread.

share|improve this answer
    
I was wondering if you could use a simple system call forcing it to run in 1 thread, like MSalters proposed below. –  gt6989b Sep 1 '10 at 12:40

Assign only a single processor core to your process. On Windows, you can do so with SetProcessAffinityMask

share|improve this answer
2  
This would not ensure that his threads will be serialized. –  tibur Aug 31 '10 at 7:56
    
Exactly what I needed. I wanted to get the correct boost call to force the library to run 1 thread at a time, if there was one, to do this on Red Hat Linux. –  gt6989b Sep 1 '10 at 12:40
1  
@Gt6989b, although this will indeed make only one thread run at a time, all the threads will still be active, meaning the OS scheduler may choose to interrupt a thread at any time and let a different one run instead. Rather than running in serial or in parallel, your thread will run interleaved. It's hard for me to tell whether that's really what you want. –  Rob Kennedy Sep 1 '10 at 14:22
    
I see, thank you. –  gt6989b Nov 5 '10 at 17:20

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.