Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I wonder which of these excerpts should take less resources, when we want to see if "word" is an element of an array:

Excerpt 1 - Check variable:

<?php
function checkWord($word, $elements) {
    $array = array($word => true);
    foreach ($elements as $element) {
        if (isset($array[$element])) return true;
    }
    return false;
}

$elements = array('this', 'is', 'an', 'array', 'with', 'a', 'word');
checkWord('word', $elements);
?>

Excerpt 2 - Compare string:

<?php
function checkWord($word, $elements) {
    foreach ($elements as $element) {
        if ($element == $word) return true;
    }
    return false;
}

$elements = array('this', 'is', 'an', 'array', 'with', 'a', 'word');
checkWord('word', $elements);
?>

I know we could simply use in_array(), but that is not the point here. So, in summary, is a variable check with isset better than comparing strings?

EDIT Please understand that I know there are better ways of doing this. I am just asking which of the ways above is better and takes less resources.

share|improve this question
1  
Shouldn't they be wrapped in functions if they are returning true or false? –  alex Aug 31 '10 at 0:00
    
Yeah, this is just a quick code I made. That is not the problem here, but it's ok, I will edit :) –  Nuno Peralta Aug 31 '10 at 0:03
    
How about just creating the appropriate array and using in_array? It will undoubtedly be quicker than what you're proposing. –  Jay Taylor Aug 31 '10 at 0:10
    
in_array should work perfectly for this case. Whats wrong with it?? –  Iznogood Aug 31 '10 at 0:10
2  
@Mark, Although it was my fault for speed reading the question the first time, I actually had no trouble understanding that what Nuno wants to know is which of the two methods of iteration over an array is faster and thus less of a resource hog, BESIDES the built-in in_array(). I don't really see any reasons for the downvotes, it's a perfectly valid question. –  Valentin Flachsel Aug 31 '10 at 1:38

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I did a benchmarking test with a 51000+ unique words list to satisfy your (and mine, to be honest) curiosity. Although not by much, using isset() is indeed faster than comparing strings, with an average of 0.0144901275634765625 seconds for the first method vs 0.0164241790771484375 seconds for the second method, out of 5 tries.

Hope this helps.

share|improve this answer
    
I said above we could use that function. That is not the question here. –  Nuno Peralta Aug 31 '10 at 0:05
    
I have realized that after I posted, my apologies ! Please see the updated answer. –  Valentin Flachsel Aug 31 '10 at 1:28
    
Yeah, thank you for answering the question, and for understanding the purpose of it (I assume you were the only one, to be honest...). Anyway, do these tests help me to decide what is the best for CPU? Thank you once more! –  Nuno Peralta Aug 31 '10 at 2:55
    
Glad to be of help ! Actually, this tests only shows that the difference between the methods is negligible, and the fastest method remains in_array() @ 0.003899097442626953125 seconds on the mentioned data set. Rather than using alternative methods, I would process the data set in such a way that the built-in method can be used on it, but if for whatever freak reason this is not possible, I would obviously go for the fastest remaining method which in this case is the first one. In the end, it depends mostly on your given data set. –  Valentin Flachsel Aug 31 '10 at 3:25
    
Ok thank you :) Yeah, I usually rely on built-in functions. Also, I don't really use foreach when I can simply avoid it (because it duplicates the array), so it can also be slowing the tests here :) Anyway, as I was expecting, isset() is better than string compare! –  Nuno Peralta Aug 31 '10 at 11:21

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.