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I've created this script to calculate the date for 10 days in advance in the format of dd/mm/yyyy:

var MyDate = new Date();
var MyDateString = new Date();
MyDate.setDate(MyDate.getDate()+10);
MyDateString = MyDate.getDate() + '/' + (MyDate.getMonth()+1) + '/' + MyDate.getFullYear();

I need to have the date appear with leading zeroes on the day and month component by way of adding these rules to the script. I can't seem to get it to work.

if (MyDate.getMonth < 10)getMonth = '0' + getMonth;

and

if (MyDate.getDate <10)get.Date = '0' + getDate;

If someone could show me where to insert these into the script I would be really appreciative.

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3  
As a good convention, you should lowercase the first character in your variable names and reserve camel casing for objects/prototypes. –  zykadelic Jan 16 '14 at 18:46

9 Answers 9

up vote 487 down vote accepted

Try this: http://jsfiddle.net/xA5B7/

var MyDate = new Date();
var MyDateString;

MyDate.setDate(MyDate.getDate() + 20);

MyDateString = ('0' + MyDate.getDate()).slice(-2) + '/'
             + ('0' + (MyDate.getMonth()+1)).slice(-2) + '/'
             + MyDate.getFullYear();

EDIT:

To explain, .slice(-2) gives us the last two characters of the string.

So no matter what, we can add "0" to the day or month, and just ask for the last two since those are always the two we want.

So if the MyDate.getMonth() returns 9, it will be:

("0" + "9") // Giving us "09"

so adding .slice(-2) on that gives us the last two characters which is:

("0" + "9").slice(-2)
"09"

But if MyDate.getMonth() returns 10, it will be:

("0" + "10") // Giving us "010"

so adding .slice(-2) gives us the last two characters, or:

("0" + "10").slice(-2)
"10"
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4  
Thanks you help and explanation of your method Patrick –  Julian Coates Aug 31 '10 at 5:16
7  
A brilliant solution! –  Kay Aug 22 '12 at 3:02
15  
Wow... Color me impressed after 15 years of programming. Great solution. –  Lenny Markus Jan 2 '13 at 21:31
2  
Can someone explain why this is better than the answer that @Aleross provides below? It is not immediately clear what it does versus the pad function which is explicitly clear. –  n00b Oct 29 '13 at 20:37
1  
Simpler, just use myDate.toISOString() which has leading zeros. Parse out relevant parts using substring. –  John Henckel Mar 28 '14 at 3:21

Here is an example from the Date object docs on the Mozilla Developer Network using a custom "pad" function, without having to extend Javascript's Number prototype. The handy function they give as an example is

function pad(n){return n<10 ? '0'+n : n}

And below is it being used in context.

/* use a function for the exact format desired... */
function ISODateString(d){
    function pad(n){return n<10 ? '0'+n : n}
    return d.getUTCFullYear()+'-'
    + pad(d.getUTCMonth()+1)+'-'
    + pad(d.getUTCDate())+'T'
    + pad(d.getUTCHours())+':'
    + pad(d.getUTCMinutes())+':'
    + pad(d.getUTCSeconds())+'Z'
}

var d = new Date();
console.log(ISODateString(d)); // prints something like 2009-09-28T19:03:12Z
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Awesome. That sorted my bug out! –  DazManCat Jun 6 '14 at 11:02
Number.prototype.padZero= function(len){
 var s= String(this), c= '0';
 len= len || 2;
 while(s.length < len) s= c + s;
 return s;
}

//in use:

(function(){
 var myDate= new Date(), myDateString;
 myDate.setDate(myDate.getDate()+10);

 myDateString= [myDate.getDate().padZero(),
 (myDate.getMonth()+1).padZero(),
 myDate.getFullYear()].join('/');

 alert(myDateString);
})()

/*  value: (String)
09/09/2010
*/
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var MyDate = new Date();
var MyDateString = '';
MyDate.setDate(MyDate.getDate());
var tempoMonth = (MyDate.getMonth()+1);
var tempoDate = (MyDate.getDate());
if (tempoMonth < 10) tempoMonth = '0' + tempoMonth;
if (tempoDate < 10) tempoDate = '0' + tempoDate;
MyDateString = tempoDate + '/' + tempoMonth + '/' + MyDate.getFullYear();
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function formatDate(jsDate){
  // add leading zeroes to jsDate when days or months are < 10.. 
  // i.e.
  //     formatDate(new Date("1/3/2013") 
  // returns
  //    "01/03/2103"
  ////////////////////
  return (jsDate.getDate()<10?("0"+jsDate.getDate()):jsDate.getDate()) + "/" + 
      ((jsDate.getMonth()+1)<10?("0"+(jsDate.getMonth()+1)):(jsDate.getMonth()+1)) + "/" + 
      jsDate.getFullYear();
}
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You could use ternary operator to format the date like an "if" statement.

For example:

var MyDate = new Date();
MyDate.setDate(MyDate.getDate()+10);
var MyDateString = (MyDate.getDate() < 10 ? '0' + MyDate.getDate() : MyDate.getDate()) + '/' + ((d.getMonth()+1) < 10 ? '0' + (d.getMonth()+1) : (d.getMonth()+1)) + '/' + MyDate.getFullYear();

So

(MyDate.getDate() < 10 ? '0' + MyDate.getDate() : MyDate.getDate())

would be similar to an if statement, where if the getDate() returns a value less than 10, then return a '0' + the Date, or else return the date if greater than 10 (since we do not need to add the leading 0). Same for the month.

Edit: Forgot that getMonth starts with 0, so added the +1 to account for it. Of course you could also just say d.getMonth() < 9 :, but I figured using the +1 would help make it easier to understand.

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I wrapped the correct answer of this question in a function that can add multiple leading zero's but defaults to adding 1 zero.

function zeroFill(nr, depth){
  depth = (depth === undefined)? 1 : depth;

  var zero = "0";
  for (var i = 0; i < depth; ++i) {
    zero += "0";
  }

  return (zero + nr).slice(-(depth + 1));
}

for working with numbers only and not more than 2 digits, this is also an approach:

function zeroFill(i) {
    return (i < 10 ? '0' : '') + i
  }
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The following aims to extract configuration, hook into Date.protoype and apply configuration.

I've used an Array to store time chunks and when I push() this as a Date object, it returns me the length to iterate. When I'm done, I can use join on the return value.

This seems to work pretty fast: 0.016ms

// Date protoype
Date.prototype.formatTime = function (options) {
    var i = 0,
        time = [],
        len = time.push(this.getHours(), this.getMinutes(), this.getSeconds());

    for (; i < len; i += 1) {
        var tick = time[i];
        time[i] = tick < 10 ? options.pad + tick : tick;
    }

    return time.join(options.separator);
};

// Setup output
var cfg = {
    fieldClock: "#fieldClock",
    options: {
        pad: "0",
        separator: ":",
        tick: 1000
    }
};

// Define functionality
function startTime() {
    var clock = $(cfg.fieldClock),
        now = new Date().formatTime(cfg.options);

    clock.val(now);
    setTimeout(startTime, cfg.options.tick);
}

// Run once
startTime();

demo: http://jsfiddle.net/tive/U4MZ3/

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You can define a "str_pad" function (as in php):

function str_pad(n) {
    return String("00" + n).slice(-2);
}
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