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I'm having some real trouble with timing a function from within an instance of a class. I'm not sure I'm going about it the right way (never used timeIt before) and I tried a few variations of the second argument importing things, but no luck. Here's a silly example of what I'm doing:

import timeit

class TimedClass():
    def __init__(self):
        self.x = 13
        self.y = 15
        t = timeit.Timer("self.square(self.x, self.y)")
        try:
            t.timeit()
        except:
            t.print_exc()

    def square(self, _x, _y):
        print _x**_y

myTimedClass = TimedClass()

Which, when ran, complains about self.

Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "timeItTest.py", line 9, in __init__
    t.timeit()
  File "C:\Python26\lib\timeit.py", line 193, in timeit
    timing = self.inner(it, self.timer)
  File "<timeit-src>", line 6, in inner
    self.square(self.x, self.y)
NameError: global name 'self' is not defined

This has to do with TimeIt creating a little virtual environment to run the function in but what do I have to pass to the second argument to make it all happy?

share|improve this question
    
Do you have any specific reason why you want to use timeit within the init of the class? You should just time that function call from the "outside": t = timeit.Timer("myTimedClass.square(x, y)") Btw "myTimedClass" is not an inspired name, because that is an instance of TimedClass, not a class. –  Béres Botond Aug 31 '10 at 12:56
    
In my real program, I need to read a bunch of data from an external file to set up the object. The reading code I separated from the init to another function in case I need to update the object again later. Since I'm running a bunch of instances and they do their own file loading, I want them all to time themselves too. In the simple example I posted above, of course I could time it from outside, but that doesn't help with my real project. –  DizzyDoo Aug 31 '10 at 13:18
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2 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Why do you want the timing inside the class being timed itself? If you take the timing out of the class, you can just pass a reference. I.e.

import timeit

class TimedClass():
    def __init__(self):
        self.x = 13
        self.y = 15

    def square(self, _x, _y):
        print _x**_y

myTimedClass = TimedClass()
timeit.Timer(myTImedClass.square).timeit()

(of course the class itself is redundant, I assume you have a complexer use-case where a simple method is not sufficient).

In general, just pass a callable that has all setup contained/configured. If you want to pass strings to be timed they should contain all necessary setup inside them, i.e.

timeit.Timer("[str(x) for x in range(100)]").timeit()

If you really, really need the timing inside the class, wrap the call in a local method, i.e.

def __init__(self, ..):
    def timewrapper():
        return self.multiply(self.x, self.y)

    timeit.Timer(timewrapper)
share|improve this answer
    
Comprehensive answer. I'll be looking at using the timewrapper. Thanks! –  DizzyDoo Aug 31 '10 at 16:10
    
Thanks very helpful –  Freelancer Sep 5 '13 at 14:04
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if you're willing to consider alternatives to timeit, i recently found the stopwatch timer utility which might be useful in your case. it's really simple and intuitive, too:

import stopwatch

class TimedClass():

    def __init__(self):
        t = stopwatch.Timer()
        # do stuff here
        t.stop()
        print t.elapsed
share|improve this answer
2  
Much simpler than figuring out timeit. Python's got a good breakdown of all the properties of timeit, but the explanation and examples of how to use it to profile code are confusing. –  Kumba Jan 28 '12 at 1:34
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