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I want to turn an array or list of ints into a comma delimited string, like this:

string myFunction(List<int> a) {
    return string.Join(",", a);
}

But string.Join only takes List<string> as the second parameter. What is the best way to do this?

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2  
What version of C# / .NET are you using? –  Mark Byers Aug 31 '10 at 15:23
    
I'm using .NET 3.5 –  Code Commander Aug 31 '10 at 15:39
    
Possible duplicate of stackoverflow.com/questions/3211422/… –  goodeye Nov 19 '13 at 1:40

7 Answers 7

up vote 69 down vote accepted

The best way is to upgrade to .NET 4.0 where there is an overload that does what you want:

If you can't upgrade, you can achieve the same effect using Select and ToArray.

    return string.Join(",", a.Select(x => x.ToString()).ToArray());
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2  
My answer was obviously better but I'll throw you a bone. –  ChaosPandion Aug 31 '10 at 15:19
    
Also assumes he is at least on C# 3, .NET 3.5 –  Anthony Pegram Aug 31 '10 at 15:19
    
that's one neat solution! –  Stefanvds Aug 31 '10 at 15:20
2  
because he would have a List<int>. The linq select converts the List<int> to IEnumerable<string> and then to the array. –  Greg Bogumil Aug 31 '10 at 15:30
1  
@gbogumil: Sorry, didn't notice it was an int. –  Steven Sudit Aug 31 '10 at 16:16

A scalable and safe implementation of a generic enumerable string join for .Net 3.5. The usage of iterators is so that the join string value is not stuck on the end of the string. Works correctly with 0, 1 and more elements:

public static class StringExtensions
{
    public static string Join<T>(this string joinWith, IEnumerable<T> list)
    {
        if (list == null)
            throw new ArgumentNullException("list");
        if (joinWith == null)
            throw new ArgumentNullException("joinWith");

        var stringBuilder = new StringBuilder();
        var enumerator = list.GetEnumerator();

        if (!enumerator.MoveNext())
            return string.Empty;

        while (true)
        {
            stringBuilder.Append(enumerator.Current);
            if (!enumerator.MoveNext())
                break;

            stringBuilder.Append(joinWith);
        }

        return stringBuilder.ToString();
    }
}

Usage:

var arrayOfInts = new[] { 1, 2, 3, 4 };
Console.WriteLine(",".Join(arrayOfInts));

var listOfInts = new List<int> { 1, 2, 3, 4 };
Console.WriteLine(",".Join(listOfInts));

Enjoy!

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+1: This is my preferred way pre .NET 4.0. Much more scalable than producing an entirely new array of strings from a list of ints so that String.Join(String, String[]) can be called. Only thing I'd say is that it's unusual to see this method written as an extension on String as opposed to IEnumerable<String> - I tend to always call it at the end of a long chain of extension method calls. –  Alex Humphrey Aug 31 '10 at 16:32
1  
I stole the idea from Python if that is any help! –  Deleted Aug 31 '10 at 19:47

Had a similar Extension Method that I modified to this

public static class MyExtensions
{
    public static string Join(this List<int> a, string splitChar)
    {
        return string.Join(splitChar, a.Select(n => n.ToString()).ToArray());
    }
}

and you use it like this

var test = new List<int>() { 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 };
string s = test.Join(",");

.NET 3.5

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Not sure I like this. IEnumerable<T> already has a Join method, and this new method performs a completely different operation, making its use counterintuitive. Secondly, if you were going to create this method, go ahead and make it generically applicable. –  Anthony Pegram Aug 31 '10 at 15:41
    
It's a hack mimicking the join method on arrays in Ruby. ruby-doc.org/core/classes/Array.html#M002182 –  Jonas Elfström Aug 31 '10 at 15:58
    
Also .ToString() does not always return a string representation of T so I guess that could really cause some confusion. –  Jonas Elfström Aug 31 '10 at 16:00

.NET 2.0:

static string IntListToDelimitedString(List<int> intList, char Delimiter)
{
    StringBuilder builder = new StringBuilder();

    for (int i = 0; i < intList.Count; i++)
    {
        builder.Append(intList[i].ToString());

        if (i != intList.Count - 1)
            builder.Append(Delimiter);
    }

    return builder.ToString();
}
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2  
A good 2.0 approach. You might want to make the joining character a parameter rather than hardcoding it into the method. –  Anthony Pegram Aug 31 '10 at 15:48
    
@Anthony - Good point. Done. –  Kyle Rozendo Aug 31 '10 at 15:50
    
A typical optimization is to append the delimiter without testing, then remove the last character once you get out of the loop. –  Steven Sudit Aug 31 '10 at 16:15
    
@Steven - I was thinking about it, but I think this would also depend on the length of the string (without testing I am unsure), so I stuck to the simple bool check. –  Kyle Rozendo Aug 31 '10 at 16:19
    
I suspect the optimization would only be measurable for long strings. Having said that, I don't think it would be slower for even short ones. –  Steven Sudit Aug 31 '10 at 18:04

This answer is for you if you don't want to venture into the depths of .NET 4.0 just yet.

String.Join() concatenates all the elements of a string array, using the specified separator between each element.

The syntax is

public static string Join(
    string separator,
    params string[] value
)

Rather than passing your List of ints to the Join method, I suggest building up an array of strings first.

Here is what I propose:

static string myFunction(List<int> a) {
    int[] intArray = a.ToArray();
    string[] stringArray = new string[intArray.Length];

    for (int i = 0; i < intArray.Length; i++)
    {
        stringArray[i] = intArray[i].ToString();
    }

    return string.Join(",", stringArray);
}
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3  
This is a decent approach if someone is still on 2.0. However, intArray is unnecessary. List<int> is indexable and has a Count property, making the conversion to an array superfluous. You also might want to make the joining character a parameter rather than hardcoding it into the method. –  Anthony Pegram Aug 31 '10 at 15:45

USING NET 4.0

public partial class _Default : System.Web.UI.Page
{
    protected void Page_Load(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        string s = myFunction(PopulateTestList());
        this.TextBox1.Text = s;
    }
    protected List<int> PopulateTestList()
    {
        List<int> thisList = new List<int>();
        thisList.Add(22);
        thisList.Add(33);
        thisList.Add(44);

        return thisList;
    }
    protected string myFunction(List<int> a)
    {
        return string.Join(",", a);
    }
}
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In .Net the list class has a .ToString() method something like this could work:

string myFunction(List<int> a) 
{
  return string.Join(",", a.ToString());
}

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/s6hkc2c4(v=vs.110).aspx

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This answer from 2010 already states that, as ToString is implied when doing a string.Join. –  Miller Mar 31 '14 at 23:31

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