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I usually rebase when I pull in changes from my teammates, and often time I have conflicts:

...
CONFLICT (content): Merge conflict in app/views/search/index.html.erb
Auto-merging public/stylesheets/application.css
CONFLICT (content): Merge conflict in public/stylesheets/application.css
Failed to merge in the changes.
Patch failed at 0001 organizing

When you have resolved this problem run "git rebase --continue".
If you would prefer to skip this patch, instead run "git rebase --skip".
To restore the original branch and stop rebasing run "git rebase --abort".

So after opening each file with a conflict, fixing it then committing the fixed files:

~/Projects/myApp[956f6e1...]% git rebase --continue
You must edit all merge conflicts and then
mark them as resolved using git add

I still get the same error...

~/Projects/myApp[64b3779...]% git rebase --continue                         
Applying: organizing
No changes - did you forget to use 'git add'?

When you have resolved this problem run "git rebase --continue".
If you would prefer to skip this patch, instead run "git rebase --skip".
To restore the original branch and stop rebasing run "git rebase --abort".

I've sortof always had this problem, but I guess never really chose to address it, I would I always just get lazy and git rebase --skip, how do I actually resolve the conflict the right way?

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3 Answers

up vote 16 down vote accepted

So after opening each file with a conflict, fixing it then committing the fixed files...

The problem is that you aren't supposed to commit the fixes. If a.txt has a merge conflict, then your shell log should look like:

$ vim a.txt # fix conflict
$ git add a.txt
$ # no commit between add and rebase!
$ git rebase --continue

Calling git rebase --continue will take care of the commit itself.

I'm not sure how to "get back" to before your commit, when you're in the middle of a rebase. git reset --hard HEAD would probably do the trick, but personally I'd feel safer just going straight to git rebase --abort and starting over without committing in the middle.

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Yah I agree... I suppose I didn't really read the error message (per my usual workflow), git rebase --abort solved the immediate problem. Thanks again! –  Joseph Silvashy Aug 31 '10 at 16:56
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Happy to help! git can definitely be a little confusing at times, but I have no idea how I ever survived without it. –  Mark Rushakoff Aug 31 '10 at 16:58
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I agree with Mark Rushakoff that fixing commits should not include committing them.

There is at least one other way that git will continue to say that "You must edit all merge conflicts and then mark them as resolved using git add" even after you have done just this. This may occur if you remove files from git version control, but leave the unversioned file sitting in your working tree and then try to perform a rebase.

I was able to fix this problem as follows:

  1. Terminate rebase with git rebase --abort
  2. Determine offending file by looking at git status
  3. I moved my unversioned files to my tmp directory
  4. Redo the rebase - in my case git svn rebase
  5. If you want the unversioned file hanging around, move it back where you want it (I left mine in my tmp directory)

Hope that helps.

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I found myself in the same boat and git rebase --continue didn't help. Running rm -fr .git/rebase-apply fixed the issue though

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I caution people about doing this. I tried it and it seems to have hosed up my branch and I am unable to undo this (tried git rebase --abort and then git reset --hard HEAD). Even git reflog doesn't seem to show my earlier work (last commit on branch before rebase). Reconstructing my patch with the help of my IDE, which thankfully asked before deleting/updating the files and changes that I just blew away. –  sage May 19 '13 at 17:47
    
Took closer look at git reflog output and found my commits, which I was able to also get to by just checking out the original branch (after saving my detached head mess with git checkout -b new_branch_name). I still caution about doing this, given what a mess it caused in my case. –  sage May 19 '13 at 17:59
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