Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Our file structures is pretty good, organizing functionality in separate folders. My question is how do others work on applications that involves upwards of 500 JavaScript files.

We have written a maven plugin to concatenate these files together (also runs YUI compressor). However, this involves 3-10seconds of compiling for every change.

Is this step necessary for organization of a large application, I feel like a well structured HTML file pulling in all these resources would save me 45minutes every day.

share|improve this question
    
you shold really think of using flash or silverlight –  Aviatrix Aug 31 '10 at 19:07
    
That is a lot of JavaScript! –  ChaosPandion Aug 31 '10 at 19:08
2  
Look at info on LabJS, RequireJS, maybe dojo. There are sophisticated dependency solutions out there. –  Pointy Aug 31 '10 at 19:09

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

For my own framework projects, typically monitoring, testing, or in-page services to orchestrate other toolkits (but not as high as your file count), my approach has been to target the individual and dynamically loaded files during development. For test, I'll run one build to compress and version the individual files, and test the individual files again because, depending on the concatenation order, compression technique, and browser, I may wind up with a script error and it's a pain to dig it out of one monster file. Third, I'll concatenate together and test once more.

In the HTML reference, I'll either target the uncompressed file, which loads specified dependencies, or the compound file. A separate bootstrap file names the dependencies, which are either included in the compound file, or loaded dynamically as needed.

This way I can add or change a file, and start developing and testing without rebuilding.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, excellent tips here. I may try to incorporate a dependency solution as well. –  Drew Aug 31 '10 at 19:27

The solution is likely to concatenate and compress for user testing and production only.

For development, it's probably best to simply import them all into the HTML file. It speeds up the dev process, and also simplifies debugging. It also allows the browser to cache some of those files.

When you can't rely on cached copies (which, with 500 files, I don't think will be very often), it will slow down load times.

share|improve this answer

You can likely save a lot of time by only running the compressor in production. The YUI compressor is notoriously slow, because it uses Java Rhino interpreter to actually parse the JavaScript and analyze it etc.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.