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I created a program in Java and I designed it so that methods that I want them to appear (getter methods) in the main, I can call them easily after initiate the class that holds these methods.

The question is that, I need to make this application (that holds the getter methods) to be like an API so that I can give my application for developers to use my functions (the getter methods) if they need them, and only what they need is to add this file (I think the API after is done shown as .jar file).

How can I make it so that I can make my code reusable with other application? It's similar to the .dll, I think.

Thanks a lot ;)

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Do you want to hide the implementation? –  stacker Aug 31 '10 at 19:42

6 Answers 6

up vote 19 down vote accepted

Create a JAR. Then include the JAR. Any classes in that JAR will be available. Just make sure you protect your code if you are giving out an API. Don't expose any methods / properties to the end user that shouldn't be used.

Edit: In response to your comment, make sure you don't include the source when you package the JAR. Only include the class files. That's the best you can really do.

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How to protect my code from being steal ?? The thing that I know is that, you can get the source code of the jar file easily... So, is there is a way to make it hard for being stolen or not ?? –  Q8Y Aug 31 '10 at 20:34
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You can't really. Don't include the source, just the compiled code (as others have said), but that doesn't stop determined people using decompilers etc. –  Ben Sep 1 '10 at 12:50
    
You can use a code obfuscator to protect your code from being stolen. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Obfuscation_(software) –  Accipheran Jan 5 '13 at 6:26
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@Accipheran You can use an obfuscator. However, all that does is make code more difficult to understand. Obfuscation is not a 1-way street. Anyone with enough motivation and/or the right tools will still be able to "steal" your code. –  Zack Marrapese Jan 8 '13 at 17:46

You need to package your application as a jar file. You can use ant jar task to create jar files or you can use the jar command.

For ant tasks look at this link.

For creating it manually look at this link.

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These two methods looks wired to me... From where can I write the code for creating the jar file ?? is it from the command line ?? cause they didn't specify that !! Is there is a problem if I use Eclipse for generating the jar file ?? does it give the same result ?? Is there is an issue with the security in this way(Eclipse)... Thanks alot –  Q8Y Aug 31 '10 at 20:41
    
The ant task is part of a build.xml. However you can also programatically invoke ant tasks. The second link (manual one) is done by command line. You can generate the jar file from eclipse too but I would recommend using a build.xml since it will help make your app more enterprise friendly to deploy. –  CoolBeans Aug 31 '10 at 21:01
    
In addition to the methods outlined here, you can of course export your classes as a JAR from Eclipse / IDE of choice, yes. –  Ben Sep 1 '10 at 12:50

To be useable as an API, your classes should:

  • Use a unique package (ideally following the convention, i.e. the reverse of a domain you own as prefix). This prevents naming conflicts
  • Have only those classes and methods public or protected that are intended to be used by others. This makes it easier to use.
  • Have extensive Javadoc comments.
  • Be available as a JAR file - ideally separate JARs for binary distribution, source code and javadoc files.
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Make sure you write and publish javadocs for all your public and protected classes and methods.

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Yah... I did that for my methods... for me and for the one will use the API .. Javadocs is nice, but is there is a better way to organize the files that are generated in html format. Since, many files are generated along with the (Index)... I hope there is a way to organize that and to make it professional ;) –  Q8Y Aug 31 '10 at 20:46
    
@Q8Y - Javadoc is professional. Sun/Oracle use it for the Java library documentation, as well as most third party library providers. I could pretty much name anyone here, but a couple of examples would be Spring Framework (static.springsource.org/spring/docs/3.0.x/javadoc-api) or Apache Commons (IO - commons.apache.org/io/api-release/index.html) –  Noel M Aug 31 '10 at 21:08
    
Defined "better". Also javadoc is the defacto standard for documenting java API's. –  Thorbjørn Ravn Andersen Sep 2 '10 at 5:23

There are several ways you can expose your code. Creating a jar and distributing that may be the easiest as other developers will just have to include your jar. However, if you are talking about "anyone" accessing your code, a web service may make more sense as you can provide access to the data without providing all of the necessary code. You mention providing access to your getters - if you just create a class that has getters, the other developers can use them, but how are they going to be populated? If your application is self contained in that it gets the necessary data and provides the getters, that should work, but if you are talking about providing access to data from your running application, a web service makes more sense as your application can retrieve the data and provide access via publicly accessible methods.

You most likely want to create interfaces as well so developers can code against the interface and you can change the internal workings without impacting them. Any API that will be used by others should be extensively documented as well.

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To create the jar:

jar cf <jar_name> <sources>
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