Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I would like to implement a simple reference counting using smart pointers. The variable pointer represents pointer to stored object, reference_count represents total count of copies of the object.

  • if we initialize an object using NULL: reference_count = -1 else reference_count = 1
  • copy ctor and operator = increment reference_count
  • destructor decrement reference_count and if there is no other reference to pointed object performs its deletion.

Here is my code:

#ifndef smart_pointer_H
#define smart_pointer_H

template < typename T > class smart_pointer
{
    private:
        T*    pointer;      
        int reference_count;    

    public:

        smart_pointer() : pointer(0), reference_count(-1) {}

        smart_pointer(T* p) : pointer(p)
        {
            if (p != NULL)
            {
                this->reference_count = 1;
            }

            else
            {
                this->reference_count = -1;
            }
        }

        smart_pointer(const smart_pointer <T> & p) : pointer(p.pointer),     reference_count(p.reference_count + 1) {}
        bool operator == (const smart_pointer <T>& p) { return pointer == p.pointer; }
        bool operator != (const smart_pointer <T>& p) { return pointer != p.pointer; }


        ~ smart_pointer()
        {
            if(-- reference_count == 0)
        {
                std::cout << "Destructing: " << '\n';
                delete pointer;
            }
        }

        T& operator *  () { return *pointer; }
        T* operator -> () { return pointer; }

        smart_pointer <T> & operator = (const smart_pointer <T> & p)
        {
                if (this != &p)
                {
                    if( -- reference_count == 0)
                    {
                        delete pointer;
                    }

                        pointer = p.pointer;
                        reference_count = p.reference_count + 1;
                }

        return *this;
        }
};    

Here is my testing code, class sample stores 2D point and two pointers to any other 2D points.

template < typename T >
class smart_pointer;

class Point
{
private:
    double x, y;
    smart_pointer <Point> p1;
    smart_pointer <Point> p2;

public:
    Point(double xx, double yy): x(xx), y(yy) {this-> p1 = NULL; this->p2 = NULL;}
    Point(double xx, double yy, smart_pointer <Point> p1, smart_pointer <Point> p2): x(xx), y(yy) {this-> p1 = p1, this->p2 = p2; }
    double getX(){ return x;}
    double getY(){ return y;}
    void setX(double xx)  {this->x = xx;}
    void setY(double yy)  {this->y = yy;}
    void setP1(smart_pointer <Point> p1) {this->p1 = p1;}
    void setP2(smart_pointer <Point> p2) {this->p2 = p2;}

    void print()
    {
         std::cout << "x= " << x << " y= " << y << '\n';
         std::cout << "p1" << '\n';
         if (p1 != NULL)
         {
             p1->print();
         }
         std::cout << "p2" << '\n';
         if (p2 != NULL)
         {
            p2->print();
         }
         std::cout << '\n';
    }

};

List of 2D points:

#include "Point.h"

class PointsList
{
private:
    std::vector <smart_pointer <Point> > points;

public:
    smart_pointer <Point> & operator [] ( int index ) {return points[index];}

public:
    void push_back(smart_pointer <Point> p) {points.push_back(p);}
    void erase(unsigned int index) {points.erase(points.begin() += index );}
    void printPoints()
    {
        std::cout << "List of points" << '\n';
        for (unsigned int i = 0; i < points.size();  i++)
        {
            points[i]->print();

        }

    }
};

Test code:

#include "Point.h"
#include "PointsList.h"

int main()
{
    smart_pointer <Point> pb = NULL;
    pb = (new Point(0,0));
    smart_pointer <Point> p0(new Point(0,0));
    p0->print();
    smart_pointer <Point> p1(new Point(10,10));
    p1->print();
    smart_pointer <Point> p2(new Point(20,20));
    p2->print();
    smart_pointer <Point> p3(new Point(30,30));
    p3->print();

    smart_pointer <Point> pa(p3);
    p0->setP1(p2);
    p0->setP2(p3);
    p0->print();    
    p0 = p1;
    p0->print();
    p0->print();

    PointsList pl1;
    pl1.push_back(p0);
    pl1.push_back(p1);

    PointsList pl2;
    pl2.push_back(p2);
    pl2.push_back(p3);
    pl1.erase(0);
    pl1.printPoints();
    pl2.printPoints();
    return 0;
}

Where are advanteges or disadvanteges of such solution? What about running speed for huge amount of data, casting, possible problems with inheritance, etc. Thanx for your help.

I had one more question to this example: Which type of the smart pointer (shared, scoped) would be for such a data structures the most suitable:

//Class with cross-references to points p1, p2
class PointTopo
{
private:
    double x, y;
    PointTopo * p1;
    Point * p2;

public:
    PointTopo(double xx, double yy): x(xx), y(yy) {this-> p1 = NULL; this->p2 = NULL;}
    ...

};

//Class  with cross references: topological model for Delaunay triangulation
class Edge
{
   private:
      Point2D * start;
      Edge *next;
      Edge *previous;
      Edge *twin;
...
};

Thanks for your help...

share|improve this question
    
Can we assume this is just an exercise to help you understand? –  Loki Astari Aug 31 '10 at 21:19
    
PS. You forgot the copy constructor. –  Loki Astari Aug 31 '10 at 21:20
    
Yes, it is just an example of cyclic references testing, but in the future I would like to implement such smart pointers in my application. –  Ian Aug 31 '10 at 21:23
3  
Implementing your own is a bad idea. Getting a smart pointer correct is a lot more difficult than it seems. Please use one provided by a well peer reviewed library (C++0x std::shared_ptr/ C++03 boost::shared_ptr or std::tr1::shared_ptr) It took a long time for them to iron out the bugs in these smart pointers but they work very well now. –  Loki Astari Aug 31 '10 at 21:30
    
I never even noticed that shared pointers are part of the new standards C++0x ... Are there any differencies between C++0x std::shared_ptr and std::tr1::shared_ptr ? –  Ian Aug 31 '10 at 22:00

2 Answers 2

Your reference counting does not work.

If you copy or assign two smart pointers together they need to use the same location to perform the counting.

Currently each object keeps its own count and thus they may become out of sync.

smart_pointer<int>  x(new x);      // x.pointer: <good> x.reference_count: 1
{
    smart_pointer<int>  y;         // y.pointer: NULL   y.reference_count: -1

    y = x;  // x.pointer: <good> x.reference_count: 1
            // y.pointer: <good> y.reference_count: 2

    smart_pointer<int>  z;
    x = z;  // x.pointer: NULL                        x.reference_count:  0 (BAD)
            // z.pointer: NULL                        z.reference_count: -1
            // y.pointer: <bad> (it was deleted by x) y.reference_count:  2
}

Edit:

Illustrate problem as requested in comments.

At the point. Where we have just created z. But not yet done x = z;

x { pointer: 0xabcd1234  reference_count: 1  }
y { pointer: 0xabcd1234  reference_count: 2  }
z { pointer: NULL        reference_count: -1 }


    // So here is your assignment operator.
    // Doing the `x = z` we will walk through the following code.
    //
    smart_pointer <T> & operator = (const smart_pointer <T> & p)
    {
            if (this != &p)
            {
                // We get here.
                // Left hand side is 'x' so this condition will be true.
                if( -- reference_count == 0)
                {
                    // Now we are deleting a pointer.
                    // That is held by 'x'
                    delete pointer;

                    // But 'y' is holding a pointer with the same value.
                    // Now y is holding a pointer to a deleted variable.
                }

                // Here we copy 'z' into 'x'
                // Copy the pointer. That happens to be NULL.
                pointer = p.pointer;

                // Now we copy and increment the reference count.
                // So 'x' has a value of 0 while 'z' has a value of -1.
                // This also breaks you invariant on 'x' that NULL values should
                // have a reference count of -1 (as X is NULL and ref-count is 0)
                reference_count = p.reference_count + 1;
            }

    return *this;
    }

If anybody tries to use 'y' now we have undefined behavior as it contains a pointer to memory that has been de-allocated.

Edit Clasic (but overly simplistic smart pointer:

#include <vector>

template<typename T>
class SP
{
    T*        object;
    size_t*   count;

    public:
        SP(T* data)
        try
        // Use wierd try around initializer list to catch new throwing.
        // If it does we delete data to stop it from leaking.
           :object(data)
           ,count(data ? new int(1) : NULL)
        { /* This is the constructor */}
        catch(...)
        {delete data;}

        SP():                 object(NULL),       count(NULL)       {}
      //SP(T* data):          object(data),       count(new int(1)) {}  // Lined up here so it look neat but implemented above to use weird try catch
        SP(SP<T> const& rhs): object(rhs.object), count(rhs.count)  {if (count) {++(*count);}}
        SP<T>& operator=(SP<T> rhs)  // Note implicit copy construction in rhs
        {
            // Using copy swap idium for assignment.
            // The copy is hidden because the parameter is pass by value.
            this->swap(rhs);
            return *this;
        }
        void swap(SP<T>& rhs) throw()
        {
            std::swap(object, rhs.object);
            std::swap(count,  rhs.count);
        }
        ~SP()
        {
            if ((count) && (--(*count) == 0))
            {
                 delete count;
                 delete object;
            }
        }
};
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for your comment. But I can not find the problem, maybe I do not understand the problem correctly. smart_pointer <int> z; x = NULL; //x.ref_count = 0, no deletion in destructor will pe performed => no memory leak. –  Ian Aug 31 '10 at 22:07
    
Which is a good reason not to do this for real. Hold on. –  Loki Astari Aug 31 '10 at 22:23
    
The same sort of holes can be pocked into your code with the new copy constructor. –  Loki Astari Aug 31 '10 at 22:35
    
+1: The most basic tenets of reference counting is that each object has it's own reference count. You're keeping them in each pointer- so when any given pointer updates the refcount, the others don't get informed. –  Puppy Aug 31 '10 at 22:40
    
@MY:Thank you very much for your explanation and comments... –  Ian Sep 1 '10 at 8:14

I'm sure you did a great job, but why not use the smart pointer available in either boost or loki? Both are the product of many years refinement.

share|improve this answer
1  
Even ignoring both his code and Martin's comments, I would be highly skeptical that he did a great job. Doing a great job implementing smart pointers is really difficult. –  Brian Aug 31 '10 at 21:45
    
I have met very few people that can even think about all the potential problems (I am not one of those gifted few). Even Scott Myers (of C++ fame) tried to implement a smart pointer in a publication and he is still getting bug reports a decade latter. (Or so he said in a talk he did for the local C++ users group). So if Scott Myers has trouble doing it correctly then I am definately not going to try. –  Loki Astari Aug 31 '10 at 21:56
    
@Brian: I was trying to "be easy" on him. :) –  Brent Arias Sep 1 '10 at 5:28
    
@Martin: When I said "ignoring Martin's comments", I meant ignoring you outright saying his code was wrong. I was taking it for granted that Ian's code was broken based solely on the fact that he was trying to implement smart points, rather than based on any knowledge about his code. I.e. I was saying, "this is so difficult that I'll just assume you made an error. I have no need to actually check your code to see if it works; surely it has fatal bugs somewhere." –  Brian Sep 2 '10 at 17:28

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.