Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

What's the standard way to work with dates and times in Scala? Should I use Java types such as java.util.Date or there are native Scala alternatives?

share|improve this question

4 Answers 4

up vote 62 down vote accepted

A new Scala wrapper for Joda Time. This project forked from scala-time since it seems that scala-time is no longer maintained.

import com.github.nscala_time.time.Imports._

DateTime.now // returns org.joda.time.DateTime = 2009-04-27T13:25:42.659-07:00

DateTime.now.hour(2).minute(45).second(10) // returns org.joda.time.DateTime = 2009-04-27T02:45:10.313-07:00

DateTime.now + 2.months // returns org.joda.time.DateTime = 2009-06-27T13:25:59.195-07:00

DateTime.nextMonth < DateTime.now + 2.months // returns Boolean = true

DateTime.now to DateTime.tomorrow  // return org.joda.time.Interval = > 2009-04-27T13:47:14.840/2009-04-28T13:47:14.840

(DateTime.now to DateTime.nextSecond).millis // returns Long = 1000

2.hours + 45.minutes + 10.seconds
// returns com.github.nscala_time.time.DurationBuilder
// (can be used as a Duration or as a Period)

(2.hours + 45.minutes + 10.seconds).millis
// returns Long = 9910000

2.months + 3.days
// returns Period

Joda Time is a good Java library, there is a Scala wrapper / implicit conversion library avaliable for Joda Time at scala-time created by Jorge Ortiz. (Note implicits have a performance hit, but it depends on what you do if you will notice. And if you run into a performance problem you can just revert to the Joda interface)

From the README:

USAGE:
  import org.scala_tools.time.Imports._

  DateTime.now
  // returns org.joda.time.DateTime = 2009-04-27T13:25:42.659-07:00

  DateTime.now.hour(2).minute(45).second(10)
  // returns org.joda.time.DateTime = 2009-04-27T02:45:10.313-07:00

  DateTime.now + 2.months
  // returns org.joda.time.DateTime = 2009-06-27T13:25:59.195-07:00

  DateTime.nextMonth < DateTime.now + 2.months
  // returns Boolean = true
  DateTime.now to DateTime.tomorrow
  // return org.joda.time.Interval =
  //   2009-04-27T13:47:14.840/2009-04-28T13:47:14.840

  (DateTime.now to DateTime.nextSecond).millis
  // returns Long = 1000

  2.hours + 45.minutes + 10.seconds
  // returns org.scala_tools.time.DurationBuilder
  // (can be used as a Duration or as a Period)

  (2.hours + 45.minutes + 10.seconds).millis
  // returns Long = 9910000 

  2.months + 3.days
  // returns Period
share|improve this answer
4  
Video scalaj: Idiomatic Scala Wrappers for Java Libraries days2010.scala-lang.org/node/138/164 –  oluies Sep 1 '10 at 1:48
    
Thanks, I haven't know about this wrapper. –  Vadim Shender Sep 1 '10 at 2:36
    
I can't get a formatted output from this. If I use DateTime.formatted("yyyyMMdd") I just get plain "yyyyMMdd" (letters not replaced with corresponding numbers) as response. If I use DateTime.formatted(DateTimeFormat.forPattern("yyyyMMdd")) - I get an error asking for a string argument. –  Ivan Sep 2 '10 at 22:59
    
1  
Since it seems scala-time is no longer maintained, it has been superseded by nscala-time (which in contrast to scala-time works with scala 2.10). It can be found at github.com/nscala-time/nscala-time. –  Sebastian Ganslandt Mar 6 '13 at 20:16

It is the custom to use Java's types.

share|improve this answer
    
That is the question - If it is the custom, what is the native way? –  Ivan Sep 1 '10 at 1:27
3  
I suppose he intended that's it's still "customary" to use Java libraries –  pagoda_5b Jan 8 '13 at 14:45

MOTIVATION:

The Java Date and Calendar libraries are largely inadequate. They are mutable, not thread-safe, and very inconvenient to use.

The Joda Time library is a great replacement for Java's Date and Calendar classes. They're immutable by default, have a much richer and nicer API, and can easily be converted to Java's Date and Calendar classes when necessary.

This project provides a thin layer of convenience around the Joda Time libraries, making them more idiomatic to use within Scala.

(copied from https://github.com/jorgeortiz85/scala-time)

share|improve this answer

Everyone uses JodaTime, these Scala helper/wrapper libraries may need re-compilation with new versions of Scala. Jodatime is the only time library that's been around for a long time, and is stable and works reliably with every version of Scala.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.