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[12,23,987,43

What is the fastest, most efficient way to remove the "[", using maybe a chop() but for the first character?

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3  
Changed title and tags since this has nothing to do with rails –  Pablo Fernandez Sep 1 '10 at 1:18
    
I edited my answer, so it might be possible to change your selected answer. See if you can award it to Jason Stirk's answer since his is the fastest, and is very readable. –  the Tin Man Apr 22 '13 at 18:27

11 Answers 11

up vote 92 down vote accepted

I kind of favor using something like:

asdf = "[12,23,987,43"
asdf[0] = '' 

p asdf
# >> "12,23,987,43"

I'm always looking for the fastest and most readable way of doing things:

require 'benchmark'

N = 1_000_000

puts RUBY_VERSION

STR = "[12,23,987,43"

Benchmark.bm(7) do |b|
  b.report('[0]') { N.times { "[12,23,987,43"[0] = '' } }
  b.report('sub') { N.times { "[12,23,987,43".sub(/^\[+/, "") } }

  b.report('gsub') { N.times { "[12,23,987,43".gsub(/^\[/, "") } }
  b.report('[1..-1]') { N.times { "[12,23,987,43"[1..-1] } }
  b.report('slice') { N.times { "[12,23,987,43".slice!(0) } }
  b.report('length') { N.times { "[12,23,987,43"[1..STR.length] } }

end

Running on my Mac Pro:

1.9.3
              user     system      total        real
[0]       0.840000   0.000000   0.840000 (  0.847496)
sub       1.960000   0.010000   1.970000 (  1.962767)
gsub      4.350000   0.020000   4.370000 (  4.372801)
[1..-1]   0.710000   0.000000   0.710000 (  0.713366)
slice     1.020000   0.000000   1.020000 (  1.020336)
length    1.160000   0.000000   1.160000 (  1.157882)

Updating to incorporate one more suggested answer:

require 'benchmark'

N = 1_000_000

class String
  def eat!(how_many = 1)
    self.replace self[how_many..-1]
  end

  def first(how_many = 1)
    self[0...how_many]
  end

  def shift(how_many = 1)
    shifted = first(how_many)
    self.replace self[how_many..-1]
    shifted
  end
  alias_method :shift!, :shift
end

class Array
  def eat!(how_many = 1)
    self.replace self[how_many..-1]
  end
end

puts RUBY_VERSION

STR = "[12,23,987,43"

Benchmark.bm(7) do |b|
  b.report('[0]') { N.times { "[12,23,987,43"[0] = '' } }
  b.report('sub') { N.times { "[12,23,987,43".sub(/^\[+/, "") } }

  b.report('gsub') { N.times { "[12,23,987,43".gsub(/^\[/, "") } }
  b.report('[1..-1]') { N.times { "[12,23,987,43"[1..-1] } }
  b.report('slice') { N.times { "[12,23,987,43".slice!(0) } }
  b.report('length') { N.times { "[12,23,987,43"[1..STR.length] } }
  b.report('eat!') { N.times { "[12,23,987,43".eat! } }
  b.report('reverse') { N.times { "[12,23,987,43".reverse.chop.reverse } }
end

Which results in:

2.1.2
              user     system      total        real
[0]       0.300000   0.000000   0.300000 (  0.295054)
sub       0.630000   0.000000   0.630000 (  0.631870)
gsub      2.090000   0.000000   2.090000 (  2.094368)
[1..-1]   0.230000   0.010000   0.240000 (  0.232846)
slice     0.320000   0.000000   0.320000 (  0.320714)
length    0.340000   0.000000   0.340000 (  0.341918)
eat!      0.460000   0.000000   0.460000 (  0.452724)
reverse   0.400000   0.000000   0.400000 (  0.399465)
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22  
It's important to note that this will only work in Ruby 1.9. In Ruby 1.8, this will remove the first byte from the string, not the first character, which is not what the OP wants. –  Jörg W Mittag Sep 1 '10 at 8:02
    
wisest :), +1....thanks –  abhijit Jun 21 '12 at 12:18
    
+1: I always forget that to a string-position you can assign not only a single character, but also you can insert a substring. Thanks! –  quetzalcoatl Aug 13 '13 at 8:00
    
"[12,23,987,43".delete "[" –  rupweb Dec 11 '13 at 8:54
1  
That deletes it from all positions, which isn't what the OP wanted: "...for the first character?". –  the Tin Man Dec 11 '13 at 13:02

Similar to Pablo's answer above, but a shade cleaner :

str[1..-1]

Will return the array from 1 to the last character.

'Hello World'[1..-1]
 => "ello World"
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4  
+1 Take a look at the benchmark results I added to my answer. You've got the fastest run-time, plus I think it's very clean. –  the Tin Man Apr 22 '13 at 18:24
    
What about the performance of str[1,] compared to the above? –  Bohr Jul 7 '13 at 2:52
1  
@Bohr: str[1,] return you the 2nd character since the range is 1:nil. You'd need to provide the actual calculated length, or something guaranteeded to be higher than length, like, str[1,999999] (use int_max of course) to get the whole tail. [1..-1] is cleaner and probably faster, since you don't need to operate on length manually (see the [1..length] in the benchmark) –  quetzalcoatl Aug 13 '13 at 7:59

We can use slice to do this:

val = "abc"
 => "abc" 
val.slice!(0)
 => "a" 
val
 => "bc" 

Using slice! we can delete any character by specifying its index.

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If you always want to strip leading brackets:

"[12,23,987,43".gsub(/^\[/, "")

If you just want to remove the first character, and you know it won't be in a multibyte character set:

"[12,23,987,43"[1..-1]

or

"[12,23,987,43".slice(1..-1)
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I'd use "[12,23,987,43".sub(/^\[+/, "") instead of gsub(/^\[/, ""). The first lets the regex engine find all matches then they're replaced in one action and results in about a 2x improvement in speed with Ruby 1.9.3. –  the Tin Man Apr 22 '13 at 16:11

Thanks to @the-tin-man for putting together the benchmarks!

Alas, I don't really like any of those solutions. Either they require an extra step to get the result ([0] = '', .strip!) or they aren't very semantic/clear about what's happening ([1..-1]: "Um, a range from 1 to negative 1? Yearg?"), or they are slow or lengthy to write out (.gsub, .length).

What we are attempting is a 'shift' (in Array parlance), but returning the remaining characters, rather than what was shifted off. Let's use our Ruby to make this possible with strings! We can use the speedy bracket operation, but give it a good name, and take an arg to specify how much we want to chomp off the front:

class String
  def eat!(how_many = 1)
    self.replace self[how_many..-1]
  end
end

But there is more we can do with that speedy-but-unwieldy bracket operation. While we are at it, for completeness, let's write a #shift and #first for String (why should Array have all the fun‽‽), taking an arg to specify how many characters we want to remove from the beginning:

class String
  def first(how_many = 1)
    self[0...how_many]
  end

  def shift(how_many = 1)
    shifted = first(how_many)
    self.replace self[how_many..-1]
    shifted
  end
  alias_method :shift!, :shift
end

Ok, now we have a good clear way of pulling characters off the front of a string, with a method that is consistent with Array#first and Array#shift (which really should be a bang method??). And we can easily get the modified string as well with #eat!. Hm, should we share our new eat!ing power with Array? Why not!

class Array
  def eat!(how_many = 1)
    self.replace self[how_many..-1]
  end
end

Now we can:

> str = "[12,23,987,43" #=> "[12,23,987,43"
> str.eat!              #=> "12,23,987,43"
> str                   #=> "12,23,987,43"

> str.eat!(3)           #=> "23,987,43"
> str                   #=> "23,987,43"

> str.first(2)          #=> "23"
> str                   #=> "23,987,43"

> str.shift!(3)         #=> "23,"
> str                   #=> "987,43"

> arr = [1,2,3,4,5]     #=> [1, 2, 3, 4, 5] 
> arr.eat!              #=> [2, 3, 4, 5] 
> arr                   #=> [2, 3, 4, 5] 

That's better!

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1  
I remember a discussion years ago in Perl forums about such a function with the name of chip() instead of chop() (and chimp() as the analog of chomp()). –  Mark Thomas Jun 22 at 20:45

Easy way:

str = "[12,23,987,43"

removed = str[1..str.length]

Awesome way:

class String
  def reverse_chop()
    self[1..self.length]
  end
end

"[12,23,987,43".reverse_chop()

(Note: prefer the easy way :) )

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1  
If you want to preserve the "chop" semantics you could just "[12,23,987,43".reverse.chop.reverse –  Chris Heald Sep 1 '10 at 1:24
    
that is a pretty big performance overhead just to strip one char –  Pablo Fernandez Sep 1 '10 at 2:16
4  
why not use [1..-1] rather than [1..self.length] ? –  banister Sep 1 '10 at 3:59
    
Monkey patching example is pretty off for this question, it is just irrelevant and ugly IMO. –  dredozubov Mar 17 at 19:55
str = "[12,23,987,43"

str[0] = ""
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+1 for easiest way –  maček Sep 1 '10 at 2:30
3  
It's important to note that this will only work in Ruby 1.9. In Ruby 1.8, this will remove the first byte from the string, not the first character, which is not what the OP wants. –  Jörg W Mittag Sep 1 '10 at 8:03

For example : a = "One Two Three"

1.9.2-p290 > a = "One Two Three"
 => "One Two Three" 

1.9.2-p290 > a = a[1..-1]
 => "ne Two Three" 

1.9.2-p290 > a = a[1..-1]
 => "e Two Three" 

1.9.2-p290 > a = a[1..-1]
 => " Two Three" 

1.9.2-p290 > a = a[1..-1]
 => "Two Three" 

1.9.2-p290 > a = a[1..-1]
 => "wo Three" 

In this way you can remove one by one first character of the string.

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1  
This is the same as Jason Stirk's answer only his was submitted many months before. –  the Tin Man Apr 22 '13 at 16:19

In my case i prefer use like this
srt = [12,23,987,43
p srt[1..-1]

12,23,987,43

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You might want to check other answers before repeating them. This was already suggested by stackoverflow.com/a/3614642/128421 –  the Tin Man Aug 28 at 18:50

I needed to do something like this but a bit more in-depth and came up with this:

def multi_trim_ends(str, chars)
  chars.each { |char| str = trim_ends str, char }
  str
end

def trim_ends(str, char)
  super_chomp str, char
  super_chomp(str.reverse, char).reverse
end

def super_chomp(str, char)
  str.chomp!(char) while str[-1] == char
  str
end

# Example
x = "[,,123,3,343,"
multi_trim_ends(x, ['[', ','] )
=> "123,3,343" 
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Inefficient alternative:

str.reverse.chop.reverse
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