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The following is my C++ program:

main.cpp

#include <iostream>
#include <fstream>

using namespace std;

int main() {

    ofstream fileWriter;
    fileWriter.open ("firstFile.cpp");
    fileWriter << "#include <iostream>" << endl;
    fileWriter << "int main() {" << endl;
    fileWriter << "\tstd::cout << \"hello world\" << std::endl;" << endl;
    fileWriter << "\treturn 0;" << endl;
    fileWriter << "}" << endl;
    fileWriter.close();

    return 0;
}

When the above program is executed, it creates a text-file named "firstFile.cpp" containing the following code:

firstFile.cpp

#include <iostream>
int main() {
    std::cout << "hello world" << std::endl;
    return 0;
}

which, when executed, prints "hello world" on the screen.

So, I would like to add to the main.cpp file lines of code asking GCC to compile the new firstFile.cpp just created.

I am using GNU gcc on both platform Ubuntu and Windows.

Edit: Is it possible to get any error code form the call to the compiler? If not why.

share|improve this question
10  
The system function might be helpful. – Joachim Pileborg Mar 22 at 9:39
4  
First of all use g++ instead gcc. gcc is for compiling C source code. g++ is for C++ source code. – secretgenes Mar 22 at 9:48
3  
@secretgenes man gcc: gcc - GNU project C and C++ compiler – OrangeDog Mar 22 at 12:44
7  
@OrangeDog: technically correct, but practically irrelevant. gcc misses many default options (about linker, include paths and whatnot) required to compile correctly C++ programs. If you try to compile any non-trivial C++ program with gcc you typically end up with linker errors or (on more "complicated" targets) subtle malfunctions. – Matteo Italia Mar 22 at 18:22
2  
@OrangeDog : Though you can compile C++ source code with gcc compiler but it has object linking issues. g++ while linking objects automatically links in the std C++ libraries while this is not the case with gcc. – secretgenes Mar 22 at 18:36
up vote 61 down vote accepted

This is not too difficult using the std::system command. Also raw string literals allow us to insert multiline text which is useful for typing in program parts:

#include <cstdlib>
#include <fstream>

// Use raw string literal for easy coding
auto prog = R"~(

#include <iostream>

int main()
{
    std::cout << "Hello World!" << '\n';
}

)~"; // raw string literal stops here

int main()
{
    // save program to disk
    std::ofstream("prog.cpp") << prog;

    std::system("g++ -o prog prog.cpp"); // compile
    std::system("./prog"); // run
}

Output:

Hello World!
share|improve this answer
21  
Watch out for various attacks though - this code runs the default shell process. Don't pass any untrusted user input to system and be mindful of who can control the environment such as PATH, .bashrc, etc. – OrangeDog Mar 22 at 12:17
    
Thank you for the extra information regarding raw string literals. – exilit Mar 22 at 16:05
2  
Thanks, I have programmed C++ for quite a while but I never knew about raw string literals. I thought it was just one of those handy features that C# and even PHP has but C++ lacked... glad to be proven wrong! – CompuChip Mar 22 at 16:48
6  
@CompuChip - To be fair, they are a relatively new feature (as of C++11). Older compilers might not support them, so if you're sharing code with people using legacy systems, you might want to avoid them. Otherwise, yes, they are quite handy. – Darrel Hoffman Mar 22 at 19:59
1  
@Galik, you are correct. In fact, I'd argue that you should use the forward slash for everything except UI elements. The reason is simply compatibility with other OSes. I'd consider it also ideal to avoid having to switch between conventions when working with HTTP (etc) URLs. Forward slashes also don't require escaping while backslashes typically will (and thus a possible bug in waiting). – Kat Mar 29 at 14:42

All you need to do is add the following line after you create your file.

system("g++ firstFile.cpp -o hello");

Works on OS X so I hope it will work for you too.

share|improve this answer

gcc is an executable, so you have to use either system("gcc myfile.cpp") or popen("gcc myfile.cpp"), which gives you a filestream as result.

But since you are generating code anyways, you don't even need to write it to a file. You can open the gcc proces with FILE* f = popen("gcc -x ++ <whatever flags>"). Then you have you can write your coe with fwrite(f, "<c++ code>"). I know this is c and not really c++ but it might be usefull. ( I don't think there is a c++ version of popen()).

share|improve this answer
1  
Indeed popen(...) allow to get the console's result of the callee command(anything the called command should print to the screen). As explain here: stackoverflow.com/questions/7807755/reading-popen-results-in-c – Ninda Mar 23 at 10:59

To use the command line of a compiler in source file use system function.

Syntax of which is :

int system (const char* command); //built in function of g++ compiler.

In your case, it should be like

system("g++ firstFile.cpp");

PS: system function does not throw Exceptions.

Program

#include <iostream>
#include <fstream>
#include <cstdlib>

using namespace std;

int main() {

    ofstream fileWriter;
    fileWriter.open ("firstFile.cpp");
    fileWriter << "#include <iostream>" << endl;
    fileWriter << "int main() {" << endl;
    fileWriter << "\tstd::cout << \"hello world\" << std::endl;" << endl;
    fileWriter << "\treturn 0;" << endl;
    fileWriter << "}" << endl;
    fileWriter.close();

    system("g++ firstFile.cpp");

    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
is there not another way for C++ to get exeptions @secretgenes – Ninda Mar 22 at 11:10
    
@Ninda : you can catch exceptions when it arises in the try block, but in the case of system function, no exceptions are generated so it doesn't throw any exceptions to be caught in catch block. – secretgenes Mar 22 at 18:24
    
Doesn't system require cstdlib? – Cool Guy Mar 23 at 12:46
    
@CoolGuy: ya my bad, it dose require cstdlib. but it works fine in vs2012 without even including cstdlib. – secretgenes Mar 23 at 13:10

Depending on what you actually want to achieve you could also consider embedding some C++ compiler into your application.

Note that this is by far not as easy as calling an external executable, and might be subject to licence restrictions (GPL).

Also note that by using std::system or a similar mechanism you add the requirement on your target environment to actually have the called compiler available (unless you somehow bundle it with your application).

share|improve this answer

Something like this:

#include <iostream>
#include <fstream>

using namespace std;

int main() {

    ofstream fileWriter;
    fileWriter.open ("firstFile.cpp");
    fileWriter << "#include <iostream>" << endl;
    fileWriter << "int main() {" << endl;
    fileWriter << "\tstd::cout << \"hello world\" << std::endl;" << endl;
    fileWriter << "\treturn 0;" << endl;
    fileWriter << "}" << endl;
    fileWriter.close();

    system("c firstFile.cpp");

    return 0;
}

or whatever command is appropriate for the compiler you're using.

share|improve this answer
    
Doesn't system require cstdlib? – Cool Guy Mar 23 at 12:46
    
@CoolGuy Yes, you need to #include <cstdlib> in order to use system – Ninda Mar 24 at 9:44

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