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If i perform a standard query in SQLite:

SELECT * FROM my_table

I get all records in my table as expected. If i perform following query:

SELECT *, 1 FROM my_table

I get all records as expected with rightmost column holding '1' in all records. But if i perform the query:

SELECT *, COUNT(*) FROM my_table

I get only ONE row (with rightmost column is a correct count). Why is such results? I'm not very good in SQL, maybe such behavior is expected? It seems very strange and unlogical to me :(.

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up vote 14 down vote accepted

SELECT *, COUNT(*) FROM my_table is not what you want, and it's not really valid SQL, you have to group by all the columns that's not an aggregate.

You'd want something like

SELECT somecolumn,someothercolumn, COUNT(*) 
   FROM my_table 
GROUP BY somecolumn,someothercolumn
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2  
SQLite help on aggregate functions (sqlite.org/lang_aggfunc.html) don't have anything about 'group by' :(. Is it some documentation i can read about this restriction for better understanding? – Eye of Hell Sep 1 '10 at 7:08
1  
@Eye of Hell any book on SQL would do, it's nothing sqlite specific. – nos Sep 1 '10 at 8:10
    
this answer lead me to this page of the SQLite documentation on resultsets, including GROUP BY: sqlite.org/lang_select.html#resultset – devnul3 Aug 6 '15 at 16:31

count(*) is an aggregate function. Aggregate functions need to be grouped for a meaningful results. You can read: http://stackoverflow.com/questions/2698108/count-columns-group-by

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1  
SQLite help on aggregate functions (sqlite.org/lang_aggfunc.html) don't have anything about 'group by' :(. Is it some documentation i can read about this restriction for better understanding? – Eye of Hell Sep 1 '10 at 7:06
    
The SQLite documentation does say "in a group" / "in the group". I suggest to read a tutorial or a book about SQL. – Thomas Mueller Sep 1 '10 at 14:41
    
@EyeofHell only count() is the aggregate function GROUP BY is regular a part of SELECT syntax. sqlite.org/lang_select.html – XTL Apr 4 '12 at 7:35

If you want to count the number of records in your table, simply run:

    SELECT COUNT(*) FROM your_table;
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If what you want is the total number of records in the table appended to each row you can do something like

SELECT *
  FROM my_table
  CROSS JOIN (SELECT COUNT(*) AS COUNT_OF_RECS_IN_MY_TABLE
                FROM MY_TABLE)

Share and enjoy.

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