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How to do a Perl program that contains an array and that array points a hash?

It is like this pictorially,

(M1)        (M2)        ...it goes on
 |--k1=>v1   |--K1=>v1
 |--k2=>v2   |--k2=>v2

I should access that array M1, then the hash it contains inside. (and so on)...

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3  
see perldoc.perl.org/perldsc.html –  heferav Sep 1 '10 at 12:38
3  
You have been pointed to the perldocs before -- will you please read them? –  Ether Sep 1 '10 at 14:49

5 Answers 5

up vote 4 down vote accepted

This should do it - though it isn't quite clear to me how you wanted 'M1' and 'M2' to play into the scenario:

my(@array) = ( { k1 => "v1", k2 => "v2" }, { K1 => "V1", K2 => "V2" } );

print "$array[0]->{k1}\n";
print "$array[1]->{K2}\n";

You are making your life more interesting when you use different sets of keys in the different elements of the array (k1 and k2 versus K1 and K2). That's far from forbidden, but it makes the processing harder.

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Jonathan Leffler.. thanks for ur answer –  Senthil kumar Sep 1 '10 at 9:32
    
if a key contains another hash(keys & values) then how the above code snippet will look like ??? –  Senthil kumar Sep 1 '10 at 10:31
1  
@Senthil kumar A key cannot contain a hash; a key is a string. Only values can be references to hashes or arrays. If you try to store a reference into a key it will be converted into a string (like "HASH(0x8d4bc28)") that cannot be converted back into a reference. –  Chas. Owens Sep 1 '10 at 12:31
    
@Senthil my %hash1 = ( ... ); my %hash2 = ( ... ); my @arr = ({\%hash1 => \%hash2}). Perl will run this without warning you, but, as Chas says, you can't access the elements of %hash1 from @arr. –  flies Sep 1 '10 at 13:35

You need to use hash references:

my @array;    
push @array, { k1=>"v1", k2=>"v2" }, { k1=>"v1", k2=>"v2" };

Then, access the hashes like this:

my $val = $array[0]{k1};
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Interesting: Perl DWIM's both your notation without the arrow and my notation with the arrow (at least, the Perl 5.13.4 that I'm using does). –  Jonathan Leffler Sep 1 '10 at 7:35
2  
@Jonathan Leffler: That's just because when you're already indexing into an array or hash (or array/hash reference), Perl knows that the operator you are trying to index on HAS to be a scalar, and therefore a reference, because only scalars can be inserted into arrays or hashes. So there would be no such thing as a direct list index or hash lookup-- it has to be a reference. HOWEVER, if in the example above you had an $array_ref instead of @array, then to access it you NEED the first arrow, but not the second: my $val = $array_ref->[0]{k1};. –  Platinum Azure Sep 1 '10 at 7:40
1  
@Jonathan: yes, as the perldoc states: "The arrow is optional between brackets subscripts." –  eugene y Sep 1 '10 at 7:42
    
eugene y ... thanks for ur answer this answer suits my requirement –  Senthil kumar Sep 1 '10 at 9:32
    
if a key contains another hash(keys & values) then how the above code snippet will look like ??? –  Senthil kumar Sep 1 '10 at 10:30

Something like:

%h1 = ('a'=>'abc','b'=>'bcd'); # hash 1
%h2 = ('A'=>'Abc','B'=>'Bcd'); # hash 2
@arr = (\%h1,\%h2); # array of hash references.
foreach $hash_ref (@arr) { # iterate through the array.
        foreach $key(keys %$hash_ref) { # iterate through the hash.
                print $key.' '.$$hash_ref{$key}."\n"; #print key => value
        }   
}
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In the interests of teaching you to fish, here's a link to the Perl data structures cookbook (perldsc) on building complex data structures in Perl.

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You need a hash reference, as marked by { } below.

my @array = ({ k1 => "v1", k2 => 'v2' }, { K1 => 'V1', });
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if a key contains another hash(keys & values) then how the above code snippet will look like ??? pls tell answer .. –  Senthil kumar Sep 1 '10 at 10:29

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