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How to know what "\141\142\163\164\162\141\143\164" represent in literal token characters and what is "@"?

public static final String[] jjstrLiteralImages = {
"", null, null, null, null, null, null, null, null, null, null, null, null, null,
"\141\142\163\164\162\141\143\164", "\142\157\157\154\145\141\156", "\142\162\145\141\153", "\142\171\164\145", 
"\143\141\163\145", "\143\141\164\143\150", "\143\150\141\162", "\143\154\141\163\163", 
"\143\157\156\163\164", "\143\157\156\164\151\156\165\145", "\144\145\146\141\165\154\164", 
"\144\157", "\144\157\165\142\154\145", "\145\154\163\145", 
"\145\170\164\145\156\144\163", "\146\141\154\163\145", "\146\151\156\141\154", 
"\146\151\156\141\154\154\171", "\146\154\157\141\164", "\146\157\162", "\147\157\164\157", "\151\146", 
"\151\155\160\154\145\155\145\156\164\163", "\151\155\160\157\162\164", "\151\156\163\164\141\156\143\145\157\146", 
"\151\156\164", "\151\156\164\145\162\146\141\143\145", "\154\157\156\147", 
"\156\141\164\151\166\145", "\156\145\167", "\156\165\154\154", "\160\141\143\153\141\147\145", 
"\160\162\151\166\141\164\145", "\160\162\157\164\145\143\164\145\144", "\160\165\142\154\151\143", 
"\162\145\164\165\162\156", "\163\150\157\162\164", "\163\164\141\164\151\143", "\163\165\160\145\162", 
"\163\167\151\164\143\150", "\163\171\156\143\150\162\157\156\151\172\145\144", "\164\150\151\163", 
"\164\150\162\157\167", "\164\150\162\157\167\163", "\164\162\141\156\163\151\145\156\164", 
"\164\162\165\145", "\164\162\171", "\166\157\151\144", "\166\157\154\141\164\151\154\145", 
"\167\150\151\154\145", "\163\164\162\151\143\164\146\160", "\141\163\163\145\162\164", null, null, 
null, null, null, null, null, null, null, null, null, "\50", "\51", "\173", "\175", 
"\133", "\135", "\73", "\54", "\56", "\75", "\76", "\74", "\41", "\176", "\77", "\72", 
"\75\75", "\74\75", "\76\75", "\41\75", "\174\174", "\46\46", "\53\53", "\55\55", "\53", 
"\55", "\52", "\57", "\46", "\174", "\136", "\45", "\74\74", "\76\76", "\76\76\76", 
"\53\75", "\55\75", "\52\75", "\57\75", "\46\75", "\174\75", "\136\75", "\45\75", 
"\74\74\75", "\76\76\75", "\76\76\76\75", };
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If anyone has a similar problem here is the table for conversion. –  bombac Sep 1 '10 at 8:31
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3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Pretty simple:

 System.out.println("\141\142\163\164\162\141\143\164");  // first String

result: abstract


A one-liner:

 for(String s:jjstrLiteralImages) if (s!=null) System.out.println(s);

The escaped values in the String are octal representations of the ASCII values:

 /141 = 97 = 'a'

Further reading:

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thx for fast help –  bombac Sep 1 '10 at 8:21
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Try this:

System.out.println(Arrays.toString(new String[] { /* your array here */ }));

Output:

[, null, null, null, null, null, null, null, null, null, null, null, null, null, abstract, boolean, break, byte, case, catch, char, class, const, continue, default, do, double, else, extends, false, final, finally, float, for, goto, if, implements, import, instanceof, int, interface, long, native, new, null, package, private, protected, public, return, short, static, super, switch, synchronized, this, throw, throws, transient, true, try, void, volatile, while, strictfp, assert, null, null, null, null, null, null, null, null, null, null, null, (, ), {, }, [, ], ;, ,, ., =, >, <, !, ~, ?, :, ==, <=, >=, !=, ||, &&, ++, --, +, -, *, /, &, |, ^, %, <<, >>, >>>, +=, -=, *=, /=, &=, |=, ^=, %=, <<=, >>=, >>>=]

(Sounds like the reserved keywords of the java language)

Reference:

Arrays.toString(Object[]) is a helper method to generate the toString() representation of an array's elements. There is also Arrays.deepToString(Object[]) that performs the same task recursively on nested arrays.


On a side note:

I tried to sort the output and remove nulls, but it doesn't get any shorter than this:

final Set<String> set=
    new HashSet<String>(Arrays.asList(arr));
set.remove(null);
System.out.println(new TreeSet<String>(set));

Or:

final List<String> list =
    new ArrayList<String>(Arrays.asList(arr));
while(list.remove(null)){}
Collections.sort(list);
System.out.println(list);

Does anybody have a shorter version?

share|improve this answer
    
what code is then for @ and thx for fast help –  bombac Sep 1 '10 at 8:22
    
I use asciitable.com for reference. @ is \u0040 (unicode hex) , \100 (octal) and &#64; (HTML entity) –  Sean Patrick Floyd Sep 1 '10 at 8:36
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Those look like escaped characters that are just the corresponding ASCII values. Try finding a list of ASCII codes and comparing.

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hmm so "\46\75" with this table petefreitag.com/cheatsheets/ascii-codes means ".K". This is not logic for me –  bombac Sep 1 '10 at 8:12
    
"\141\142\163\164\162\141\143\164" must mean "abstract" but with ascii 141 is � –  bombac Sep 1 '10 at 8:15
    
@Juve: the numbers are octal numbers (i.e. base-8 and not base-10) as described by the JLS §3.10.6. Note that those octal escapes are very rarely used in Java, unicode escapes (\uXXXX) are much more common. –  Joachim Sauer Sep 1 '10 at 8:21
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