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Is there a jQuery equivalent to prototype's defer?

I'm looking for something that will delay the execution of a script until all of the scripts in the page are finished executing.

Thanks!


PART II: Is there any way to see if there are other setTimeouts in the queue and delay execution until after they fire? I see in the comments that sometimes setTimeout of 0 or 1 doesn't matter because it's unpredictable as to which will fire first.

Thanks again!

Update to answer

I found a bug in the code that I was using from the answer accepted below. The slice call needs to work on 0, not 1 since in the Prototype core code, it's accepting an extra parameter for the amount of time to wait (0.01). The final method then becomes:

Function.prototype.deferFunc = function() {
   var __method = this, args = Array.prototype.slice.call(arguments, 0);
   return window.setTimeout(function() {
      return __method.apply(__method, args);
   }, 0.01);
}
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I'm not sure which defer you are referring to? The only one I know is not specific to Prototype. –  Pekka 웃 Sep 1 '10 at 9:56
1  
Ah, I assume you mean this one. prototypejs.org/api/function/defer –  Pekka 웃 Sep 1 '10 at 9:59
    
Yes, I'm referring to the js library prototype. –  shmuel613 Sep 5 '10 at 12:31
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3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

All defer does is execute the function inside window.setTimeout with timeout of 0.

You can implement it like this I am sure:

Function.prototype.defer = function() {
        var __method = this, args = Array.prototype.slice.call(arguments, 1);
        return window.setTimeout(function() {
          return __method.apply(__method, args);
        }, 0);
      }

Demo

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I decided to go with this implementation since it can accept methods with parameters. It also seems closest to the implementation used by prototype (the library). THANK YOU VERY MUCH!!!! –  shmuel613 Sep 5 '10 at 12:21
    
BTW, I also want to verify that you DO need the changes that Andy E suggests above! –  shmuel613 Sep 12 '10 at 15:52
    
When I try this I get an error that says: Uncaught TypeError: Object [object DOMWindow] has no method 'apply' (This is using Strelok's code with Andy's changes). Any suggestions? –  bratsche Jul 31 '11 at 17:31
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You can use the basic version available in vanilla JavaScript for most purposes, setTimeout():

setTimeout(function() {
  //do something
}, 0);

A similar queuing mechanism jQuery uses for animations are the callbacks and the .delay() function (which uses setTimeout() underneath).

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1  
+1 for vanilla JS. The only difference is that defer() can accept variables as arguments that will be stored in their current state, kind of like a combination of setTimeout() and bind(). –  Andy E Sep 1 '10 at 10:14
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you can easily implement it:

Function.prototype.defer=function() {
    setTimeout(this, 0);
}

and here's a test:

var testFunc=function() {
    alert('first');
}
testFunc.defer();
alert('second');//first the browser will run this line, then will execute the above defered one.
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Setting the timer to 1 won't add the callback to the thread queue until 1ms later, setting the timer to 0 will add it to the thread queue immediately. –  Andy E Sep 1 '10 at 10:11
2  
Not correct Andy E, all browsers have a varying minimum timeout restriction and furthermore, the timeout will never be exact as it will wait for any script thats executing untill there's an opening. –  BGerrissen Sep 1 '10 at 10:15
2  
@BGerrissen - @Andy is correct, for example try this in IE: jsfiddle.net/nick_craver/QJdEg Notice the setTimeout(func, 1) gets queued after the setTimeout(func, 0), so setting it to 1 isn't the same, as a timeout of 0 can still jump in front, depending on the browser. –  Nick Craver Sep 1 '10 at 10:27
    
Thanks, I fixed that. –  aularon Sep 1 '10 at 10:35
    
Prototype actually uses 10ms, not 0, internally. Their docs are a touch misleading. –  Crescent Fresh Sep 1 '10 at 12:50
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