Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Which method would you like to place in tyour common class in asp.net application? A common function which you use in almost all your asp.net project question.

share|improve this question

closed as not a real question by AakashM, Steven, Paddy, Alex Reitbort, ho1 Sep 1 '10 at 12:01

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
I like that all the utility function proposed to far are already included in VB: myString.HasValue is myString <> "" in VB (yes, really, it works "correctly" with null), and an IsNumeric function is built-in as well. –  Heinzi Sep 1 '10 at 10:40

5 Answers 5

These should have always been there IMO:

/// <summary>
/// Answers true if this String is not null or empty
/// </summary>
public static bool HasValue(this string s)
{
  return !string.IsNullOrEmpty(s);
}

/// <summary>
/// Answers true if this String is either null or empty.
/// </summary>
public static bool IsNullOrEmpty(this string s)
{
  return string.IsNullOrEmpty(s);
}

Because going back to type string.IsNullOrEmpty(value) instead of continuing on feels so damn unnatural, at least to me anyway. Love it or hate it, to me (and I'm the one using it...) it's clear to read and saves me a ton of time, keystrokes and frustration.

Yes, this will probably be closed soon, but, well, I felt like semi-ranting against lack of basic string functions :)

share|improve this answer
1  
+1. These are always in my StringExtensions static class. –  Jamiec Sep 1 '10 at 10:35
public static bool TryFindControl<T>(this Control control, string id, out T foundControl) where T : class
{
   return (foundControl = control.FindControl(id) as T) != null;
}
share|improve this answer

Let me start first, This is the function I use in almost all my asp.net projects Function: To check whether string is numeric or not

 public bool IsNumeric(string str)
{
    if (str == null || str.Length == 0)
        return false;
    System.Text.ASCIIEncoding ascii = new System.Text.ASCIIEncoding();
    byte[] bytestr = ascii.GetBytes(str);
    foreach (byte c in bytestr)
    {
        if (c < 48 || c > 57)
        {
            return false;
        }
    }
    return true;
}
share|improve this answer
1  
IsNumeric("1.23") returns false? good design? –  Jamiec Sep 1 '10 at 10:37
1  
Why reinvent the wheel? if (Microsoft.VisualBasic.Information.IsNumeric(...)) { } works fine. ;-) –  Heinzi Sep 1 '10 at 10:41

Having a "common" class for functionality is generally not good design. Methods should belong to a class which encapsulates specific functionality.

However, one exception would be static classes containing extension methods, and I generally have this sort of pattern

public static class EnumerableExtensions{} // all extensions for IEnumerable<T>
public static class StringExtensions{} // all extensions for String.
share|improve this answer

A long time back I got this function somewhere from internet and I still use it, not always to generate random password ;-)

 public static string GeneratePassword(int passwordLength)
    {

        int iZero = 0, iNine = 0, iA = 0, iZ = 0, iCount = 0, iRandNum = 0;
        string sRandomString = string.Empty;

        //' we'll need random characters, so a Random object 
        //' should probably be created...
        Random rRandom = new Random(System.DateTime.Now.Millisecond);

        //' convert characters into their integer equivalents (their ASCII values)
        iZero = Convert.ToInt32("0");
        iNine = Convert.ToInt32("9");
        iA = Convert.ToInt32('A');
        iZ = Convert.ToInt32('Z');

        //' initialize our return string for use in the following loop
        sRandomString = string.Empty;


        //' now we loop as many times as is necessary to build the string 
        //' length we want
        while (iCount < passwordLength)
        {
            //' we fetch a random number between our high and low values
            iRandNum = rRandom.Next(iZero, iZ);

            // ' here's the cool part: we inspect the value of the random number, 
            // ' and if it matches one of the legal values that we've decided upon,  
            // ' we convert the number to a character and add it to our string
            if ((iRandNum >= iZero) && (iRandNum <= iNine) || (iRandNum >= iA) && (iRandNum <= iZ))
            {
                if (iRandNum >= iZero && iRandNum <= iNine)
                    sRandomString = sRandomString + iRandNum.ToString();
                else
                    sRandomString = sRandomString + Convert.ToChar(iRandNum);

                iCount = iCount + 1;
            }

        }
        //' finally, our random character string should be built, so we return it
        return sRandomString;


    }
share|improve this answer
    
However unlikely, this could end in an infinite loop. Better off putting the acceptable chars in an array, and picking a random index than continually looping over a random guess. –  Jamiec Sep 1 '10 at 11:03

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.