Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

C# .Net 4.0

I'd like to know how I can have a class which can only be instantiated from one single place. An example:

I've got a Provider class. This class exposes a method called GetData. When GetData is called, the Provider will instanciate a Data class, populate and return it. The Data class cannot be instanciated by anybody different then the Provider, so the only way to access the data will be through the Provider. Once GetData is called and a caller has received the Data class instance, he should be able to access properties/methods of this class.

How can this be done? Is there a pattern for this sort of problem? A short sample would be highly appreciated. Thanks in advance!

share|improve this question
    
This sort of solution design may be known as inversion of control. You may find an architecture already exists to build from, without writing from scratch. :) – Russell Sep 1 '10 at 11:25
up vote 8 down vote accepted

It sounds like you are looking for the factory pattern:

The factory pattern is a creational design pattern used in software development to encapsulate the processes involved in the creation of objects.

Basically your Provider class is the factory that controlls the creation of instances of the Data class.

One thing you could do control this would be to place these two types in their own assembly and make the constructor for Data be internal but the class itself public. This would mean that anyone who references the assembly would be forced to use the Provider class to create instances of Data (unless they used reflection, of course).

share|improve this answer
    
+1 Andrew - for mentioning the Fcatory pattern – ChrisBD Sep 1 '10 at 11:31
    
Thanks for your reply. I actually thought of a solution with multiple assemblies, but that would be a too big burger for this small project. Do you have an easy example on how to implement this pattern with everything being in the same assembly? – Matthias Sep 1 '10 at 11:43

Another solution would be to create an interface IData, and declare the Provider.GetData method to return IData instead of Data. Then you can have your Data class nested inside Provider. This way your Data class cannot be instantiated even by classes in the same assembly. Here is an example:

public interface IData
{
    // properties and methods
}

public class Provider
{
    public IData GetData()
    {
        return new Data();
    }

    private class Data : IData
    {
        // your implementation
    }
}
share|improve this answer

Here is an example of what Andrew described:

public class Data
{
    internal Data()
    {
        // internal constructor cannot be called from outside the assembly
    }

    // properties, fields and methods
}

public class Provider
{
    public Data GetData()
    {
        return new Data();
    }
}
share|improve this answer
public class Provider
{
  protected Provider()
  {
  }

  public static Provider CreateNewProvider()
  {
    return new Provider();
  }
}
share|improve this answer
    
The OP wants to know how to declare the Data class, not the Provider class! – Hosam Aly Sep 1 '10 at 11:34
    
Ah my mistake for not reading the question properly. Is that the reason for the down vote? – ChrisBD Sep 1 '10 at 12:19
    
Yes, as it is misleading with regards to the OP's question. – Hosam Aly Sep 3 '10 at 9:38

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.