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I'm trying to figure out serialization of .net arrays to XML. Here's a piece of code that I've come up with:

    public class Program
    {
        public class Person 
        {
            public string Firstname { get; set; }
            public string Lastname { get; set; }
            public uint Age { get; set; }
        }

        static void Main ()
        {
            Person[] p = 
            {
                new Person{Age = 20, Firstname = "Michael", Lastname = "Jackson"},
                new Person{Age = 21, Firstname = "Bill", Lastname = "Gates"},
                new Person{Age = 22, Firstname = "Steve", Lastname = "Jobs"}
            };

            SerializeObject<Person[]>(p);
        }

        static void SerializeObject<T>(T obj) where T : class
        {
            string fileName = Guid.NewGuid().ToString().Replace("-", "") + ".xml";
            using (FileStream fs = File.Create(fileName)) 
            {
                XmlSerializerNamespaces ns = new XmlSerializerNamespaces();
                ns.Add("", "");
                XmlSerializer ser = new XmlSerializer(typeof(T));
                ser.Serialize(fs, obj, ns);
            }
        }
    }

Here's an XML content that this example writes down to the XML file:

<ArrayOfPerson>
  <Person>
    <Firstname>Michael</Firstname>
    <Lastname>Jackson</Lastname>
    <Age>20</Age>
  </Person>
  <Person>
    <Firstname>Bill</Firstname>
    <Lastname>Gates</Lastname>
    <Age>21</Age>
  </Person>
  <Person>
    <Firstname>Steve</Firstname>
    <Lastname>Jobs</Lastname>
    <Age>22</Age>
  </Person>
</ArrayOfPerson>

But this is not really what I want. I would like it to look like this:

<Persons>
  <Person>
    <Firstname>Michael</Firstname>
    <Lastname>Jackson</Lastname>
    <Age>20</Age>
  </Person>
  <Person>
    <Firstname>Bill</Firstname>
    <Lastname>Gates</Lastname>
    <Age>21</Age>
  </Person>
  <Person>
    <Firstname>Steve</Firstname>
    <Lastname>Jobs</Lastname>
    <Age>22</Age>
  </Person>
</Persons>

How could I get it working this way? Thanks in advance!

share|improve this question
up vote 5 down vote accepted

You just need to make some small changes to your code, in addition to the suggestions already provided.

First the SerializeObject generic method needs to be redeclared thus:

// important: declare the input parameter to be an **array** of T, not T.
static void SerializeObject<T>(T[] obj) where T : class
{
    string fileName = Guid.NewGuid().ToString().Replace("-", "") + ".xml";
    using (FileStream fs = File.Create(fileName))
    {
        XmlSerializerNamespaces ns = new XmlSerializerNamespaces();
        ns.Add("", "");

        // override default root node name.  based on your question, 
        // i'm just going to append an "s" to the base type 
        // (e.g., Person becomes Persons)
        var rootName = typeof(T).Name + "s";
        XmlRootAttribute root = new XmlRootAttribute(rootName);

        // add the attribute to the serializer constructor...
        XmlSerializer ser = new XmlSerializer(obj.GetType(), root);

        ser.Serialize(fs, obj, ns);
    }
}

Secondly, in the Main() method, replace SerializeObject<Person[]>(p) with SerializeObject<Person>(p). Thus your Main() method will look like this:

static void Main(string[] args)
{
    Person[] p = 
    {
        new Person{Age = 20, Firstname = "Michael", Lastname = "Jackson"},
        new Person{Age = 21, Firstname = "Bill", Lastname = "Gates"},
        new Person{Age = 22, Firstname = "Steve", Lastname = "Jobs"}
    };

    SerializeObject<Person>(p);
}

The resulting XML will look like this:

<Persons>
  <Person>
    <Firstname>Michael</Firstname>
    <Lastname>Jackson</Lastname>
    <Age>20</Age>
  </Person>
  <Person>
    <Firstname>Bill</Firstname>
    <Lastname>Gates</Lastname>
    <Age>21</Age>
  </Person>
  <Person>
    <Firstname>Steve</Firstname>
    <Lastname>Jobs</Lastname>
    <Age>22</Age>
  </Person>
</Persons>

To override the <Person> element name to something else, set the XmlType attribute on the class, like so:

[XmlType("personEntry")]
public class Person
{
    public string Firstname { get; set; }
    public string Lastname { get; set; }
    public uint Age { get; set; }
}

The resulting XML looks like this:

<Persons>
  <personEntry>
    <Firstname>Michael</Firstname>
    <Lastname>Jackson</Lastname>
    <Age>20</Age>
  </personEntry>
  <personEntry>
    <Firstname>Bill</Firstname>
    <Lastname>Gates</Lastname>
    <Age>21</Age>
  </personEntry>
  <personEntry>
    <Firstname>Steve</Firstname>
    <Lastname>Jobs</Lastname>
    <Age>22</Age>
  </personEntry>
</Persons>
share|improve this answer
    
Nice stuff! Thank you very much! – the_V Sep 1 '10 at 17:38
    
Considering this code, could I control name of array child nodes somehow? For example render <personEntry> instead of <Person>... – the_V Sep 2 '10 at 5:40
    
@the_V: Yes you can. I've updated my post. – code4life Sep 2 '10 at 13:52

You need a container class like so:

    /// <summary>
    /// Represents an Person collection.
    /// </summary>
    [Serializable]
    [XmlRoot("Persons", IsNullable = false)]
    public sealed class Persons
    {
        /// <summary>
        /// The person collection.
        /// </summary>
        private Collection<Person> persons;

        /// <summary>
        /// Initializes a new instance of the <see cref="Persons"/> class.
        /// </summary>
        /// <param name="persons">The person list.</param>
        public Persons(Collection<Person> persons)
        {
            this.persons = persons;
        }

        /// <summary>
        /// Initializes a new instance of the <see cref="Persons"/> class.
        /// </summary>
        /// <param name="persons">The person array.</param>
        public Persons(Person[] persons)
            : this(new Collection<Person>(persons))
        {
        }

        /// <summary>
        /// Prevents a default instance of the <see cref="Persons"/> class from being created.
        /// </summary>
        private Persons()
        {
        }

        /// <summary>
        /// Copies the collection of Person objects to an array and returns
        /// it.
        /// </summary>
        /// <returns>An array of Person objects based on the
        /// collection.</returns>
        public Person[] ToArray()
        {
            Person[] personArray = new Person[this.persons.Count];

            this.persons.CopyTo(personArray, 0);
            return personArray;
        }

        /// <summary>
        /// Gets or sets the persons.
        /// </summary>
        /// <value>The persons.</value>
        [XmlElement("Person")]
        public Collection<Person> ThePersons
        {
            get
            {
                return this.persons;
            }

            set
            {
                this.persons = value;
            }
        }

        /// <summary>
        /// Gets the length of the persons.
        /// </summary>
        /// <value>The length of the persons.</value>
        [XmlIgnore]
        public int Length
        {
            get
            {
                return this.persons.Count;
            }
        }

        /// <summary>
        /// Returns an enumerator that iterates through the collection.
        /// </summary>
        /// <returns>A <see cref="IEnumerator&lt;Person&gt;"/> that can be used to
        /// iterate through the collection.</returns>
        public IEnumerator<Person> GetEnumerator()
        {
            return (IEnumerator<Person>)this.persons.GetEnumerator();
        }
    }

Initialize it with your completed array and return it as per your Main() method:

    static void Main ()
    {
        Person[] p = 
        {
            new Person{Age = 20, Firstname = "Michael", Lastname = "Jackson"},
            new Person{Age = 21, Firstname = "Bill", Lastname = "Gates"},
            new Person{Age = 22, Firstname = "Steve", Lastname = "Jobs"}
        };

        SerializeObject<Persons>(new Persons(p));

        Person[] p2 = DeserializeObject<Persons>("filename.xml").ToArray();
    }

The deserializer method is pretty simple then:

    static T DeserializeObject<T>(string fileName) where T : class
    {
        using (FileStream fs = File.OpenRead(fileName))
        {
            XmlSerializer ser = new XmlSerializer(typeof(T));
            return (T)ser.Deserialize(fs);
        }
    }

Option 2 (building on Nix's answer):

    static void SerializeObject<T>(T obj, Type t) where T : class
    {
        string fileName = Guid.NewGuid().ToString().Replace("-", "") + ".xml";
        using (FileStream fs = File.Create(fileName))
        {
            XmlSerializerNamespaces ns = new XmlSerializerNamespaces();
            ns.Add("", "");
            XmlRootAttribute root = new XmlRootAttribute(t.Name + "s");
            XmlSerializer ser = new XmlSerializer(typeof(T), root);
            ser.Serialize(fs, obj, ns);
        }
    }

can be called as such:

        SerializeObject<Person[]>(p, typeof(Person));
share|improve this answer
    
+1, good answer (except that you don't need the [Serializable] attribute for XML serialization) – Thomas Levesque Sep 1 '10 at 14:19
    
@Thomas: True fact, thanks. I did a copy/paste from a project where we have XML serialization and Remoting going on. – Jesse C. Slicer Sep 1 '10 at 14:41
    
Thanks a lot, works great! – the_V Sep 1 '10 at 16:14
    
But now the question is... how to get output xml deserialized to Persons object? Any thoughts? – the_V Sep 1 '10 at 17:25
1  
@the_V: I modded the container class slightly to support deserialization and threw in a quick method to show how to deserialize. – Jesse C. Slicer Sep 1 '10 at 19:56

In addition, this link on controlling serialization through Attributes has always been usefull to me.

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/2baksw0z(v=VS.100).aspx

share|improve this answer
    
It won't help in that case, since you can't add an attribute on the Array type – Thomas Levesque Sep 1 '10 at 14:17
    
This is true, but seeing as it was a question on xml serialization I thought I'd share a link that has helped me with it in the past, and it certianly will be helpfull if the_V does what Jesse C Slicer suggests, and split the Person off into a seperate class with properties. – asawyer Sep 1 '10 at 14:35

You can do it by adding a root attribute to your serializer. See below.

 static void SerializeObject<T>(T obj) where T : class
    {
        string fileName = Guid.NewGuid().ToString().Replace("-", "") + ".xml";
        using (FileStream fs = File.Create(fileName)) 
        {
            XmlSerializerNamespaces ns = new XmlSerializerNamespaces();
            ns.Add("", "");

            XmlRootAttribute root = new XmlRootAttribute( typeof(T).Name + "s");

            XmlSerializer
              ser = new XmlSerializer(typeof(Person[]), root);
              ser.Serialize(fs, obj, ns);
        }
    }

Alternatively you could pass in a func that does the name selecting. Your code would be

 SerializeObject<Person[]>(p, per=>p.GetType().Name);



static void SerializeObject<T>(T obj, Func<T,string> nameSelector) where T : class
{
    string fileName = Guid.NewGuid().ToString().Replace("-", "") + ".xml";
    using (FileStream fs = File.Create(fileName))
    {
        XmlSerializerNamespaces ns = new XmlSerializerNamespaces();
        ns.Add("", "");

        XmlRootAttribute root = new XmlRootAttribute(nameSelector(obj));

        XmlSerializer
          ser = new XmlSerializer(typeof(Person[]), root);
        ser.Serialize(fs, obj, ns);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Your solution now only works for the Persons case and not for any other generic <T> which is passed into his SerializeObject method. – Jesse C. Slicer Sep 1 '10 at 13:54
    
You could pass in "ArrayName" parameter. Or you could take the type and add an S if you really wanted to. – Nix Sep 1 '10 at 13:58

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