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For a string that may have zero or more hyphens in it, I need to extract all the different possibilities with and without hyphens.

For example, the string "A-B" would result in "A-B" and "AB" (two possibilities).

The string "A-B-C" would result in "A-B-C", "AB-C", "A-BC" and "ABC" (four possibilities).

The string "A-B-C-D" would result in "A-B-C-D", "AB-C-D", "A-BC-D", "A-B-CD", "AB-CD", "ABC-D", "A-BCD" and "ABCD" (eight possibilities).

...etc, etc.

I've experimented with some nested loops but haven't been able to get anywhere near the desired result. I suspect I need something recursive unless there is some simple solution I am overlooking.

NB. This is to build a SQL query (shame that SQL Server does't have MySQL's REGEXP pattern matching).

Here is one attempt I was working on. This might work if I do this recursively.

string keyword = "A-B-C-D";

List<int> hyphens = new List<int>();

int pos = keyword.IndexOf('-');
while (pos != -1)
{
    hyphens.Add(pos);
    pos = keyword.IndexOf('-', pos + 1);
}

for (int i = 0; i < hyphens.Count(); i++)
{
    string result = keyword.Substring(0, hyphens[i]) + keyword.Substring(hyphens[i] + 1);

    Response.Write("<p>" + result);
}

A B C D are words of varying length.

share|improve this question
2  
Take a look at Combinatorics - a nuget package (and source code) for computing permutations and combinations. – Ian Mercer Mar 24 at 4:12
    
For the input "A-B-C-D" How "AB-BC" be an output? why D is eleminated – un-lucky Mar 24 at 4:13
2  
What is exactly what you need? I think there may be another option instead of this brute force approach. For instance, isn't removing all hyphens from the database field a possible solution? For example: WHERE REPLACE(YourField, '-', '') = @Parameter, and this parameter contains the words with no hyphens, like ABCD. – Andrew Mar 24 at 5:47
1  
@John did you try my solution, it should work for words of varying lengths. – Mayura Vivekananda Mar 24 at 5:54
1  
Hi @Andrew - I think you are onto something there, but it's not quite as simple as that. I might create a new question for this option if I can't figure it out. – John Mar 24 at 8:11
up vote 4 down vote accepted

You should be able to track each hyphen position, and basically say its either there or not there. Loop through all the combinations, and you got all your strings. I found the easiest way to track it was using a binary, since its easy to add those with Convert.ToInt32

I came up with this:

string keyword = "A-B-C-D";
string[] keywordSplit = keyword.Split('-');
int combinations = Convert.ToInt32(Math.Pow(2.0, keywordSplit.Length - 1.0));

List<string> results = new List<string>();

for (int j = 0; j < combinations; j++)
{
    string result = "";
    string hyphenAdded = Convert.ToString(j, 2).PadLeft(keywordSplit.Length - 1, '0');
    // Generate string
    for (int i = 0; i < keywordSplit.Length; i++)
    {
        result += keywordSplit[i] +
                  ((i < keywordSplit.Length - 1) && (hyphenAdded[i].Equals('1')) ? "-" : "");
    }
    results.Add(result);
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks @MayuraVivekananda - your solution works perfectly! – John Mar 24 at 7:17

Take a look at your sample cases. Have you noticed a pattern?

  • With 1 hyphen there are 2 possibilities.
  • With 2 hyphens there are 4 possibilities.
  • With 3 hyphens there are 8 possibilities.

The number of possibilities is 2n.

This is literally exponential growth, so if there are too many hyphens in the string, it will quickly become infeasible to print them all. (With just 30 hyphens there are over a billion combinations!)

That said, for smaller numbers of hyphens it might be interesting to generate a list. To do this, you can think of each hyphen as a bit in a binary number. If the bit is 1, the hyphen is present, otherwise it is not. So this suggests a fairly straightforward solution:

  1. Split the original string on the hyphens
  2. Let n = the number of hyphens
  3. Count from 2n - 1 down to 0. Treat this counter as a bitmask.
  4. For each count begin building a string starting with the first part.
  5. Concatenate each of the remaining parts to the string in order, preceded by a hyphen only if the corresponding bit in the bitmask is set.
  6. Add the resulting string to the output and continue until the counter is exhausted.

Translated to code we have:

public static IEnumerable<string> EnumerateHyphenatedStrings(string s)
{
    string[] parts = s.Split('-');
    int n = parts.Length - 1;
    if (n > 30) throw new Exception("too many hyphens");
    for (int m = (1 << n) - 1; m >= 0; m--)
    {
        StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder(parts[0]);
        for (int i = 1; i <= n; i++)
        {
            if ((m & (1 << (i - 1))) > 0) sb.Append('-');
            sb.Append(parts[i]);
        }
        yield return sb.ToString();
    }
}

Fiddle: https://dotnetfiddle.net/ne3N8f

share|improve this answer
    
Using (m & (1 << (i - 1))) > 0 to decide if the hyphen should be added rocks! Clever code than mine! My code converts N into a binary array(or bool array) to flag the hyphen position, much slower. – Danny Chen Mar 24 at 6:32
    
Thanks @BrianRogers - I did notice the pattern just wasn't smart enough to do anything with it. Your solution works great and is very clever. Fortunately I am only likely to be dealing with strings with 1 or 2 hyphens and I will follow your advice and protect against too many hyphens. – John Mar 24 at 6:56

This works for me:

Func<IEnumerable<string>, IEnumerable<string>> expand = null;
expand = xs =>
{
    if (xs != null && xs.Any())
    {
        var head = xs.First();
        if (xs.Skip(1).Any())
        {
            return expand(xs.Skip(1)).SelectMany(tail => new []
            {
                head + tail,
                head + "-" + tail
            });
        }
        else
        {
            return new [] { head };
        }
    }
    else
    {
        return Enumerable.Empty<string>();
    }
};

var keyword = "A-B-C-D";

var parts = keyword.Split('-');

var results = expand(parts);

I get:

ABCD 
A-BCD 
AB-CD 
A-B-CD 
ABC-D 
A-BC-D 
AB-C-D 
A-B-C-D 
share|improve this answer
    
Will this recursion be tail recursion optimized? – Danny Chen Mar 24 at 6:35
    
@DannyChen - I wouldn't expect so. Tail-recursion optimization only works if the final instruction is the recursion (which it isn't in this case). But I also understand that C# doesn't have it anyway. I'd need to do this in F# for it to work. – Enigmativity Mar 24 at 6:58

I've tested this code and it is working as specified in the question. I stored the strings in a List<string>.

string str = "AB-C-D-EF-G-HI";
string[] splitted = str.Split('-');

List<string> finalList = new List<string>();

string temp = "";

for (int i = 0; i < splitted.Length; i++)
{
    temp += splitted[i];
}
finalList.Add(temp);
temp = "";

for (int diff = 0; diff < splitted.Length-1; diff++)
{
    for (int start = 1, limit = start + diff; limit < splitted.Length; start++, limit++)
    {
        int i = 0;
        while (i < start)
        {
            temp += splitted[i++];
        }
        while (i <= limit)
        {
            temp += "-";
            temp += splitted[i++];
        }
        while (i < splitted.Length)
        {
            temp += splitted[i++];
        }
        finalList.Add(temp);
        temp = "";
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
If I've missed any combination, notify me with a comment. :) – Shanid Mar 24 at 6:30
    
Thanks @Noobie. But if I use "A-B-C-D" it misses "A-BC-D". – John Mar 24 at 6:43

I'm not sure your question is entirely well defined (i.e. could you have something like A-BCD-EF-G-H?). For "fully" hyphenated strings (A-B-C-D-...-Z), something like this should do:

string toParse = "A-B-C-D";
char[] toParseChars = toPase.toCharArray();
string result = "";
string binary;
for(int i = 0; i < (int)Math.pow(2, toParse.Length/2); i++) { // Number of subsets of an n-elt set is 2^n
    binary = Convert.ToString(i, 2);
    while (binary.Length < toParse.Length/2) {
        binary = "0" + binary;
    }
    char[] binChars = binary.ToCharArray();

    for (int k = 0; k < binChars.Length; k++) {
        result += toParseChars[k*2].ToString();
        if (binChars[k] == '1') {
            result += "-";
        }
    }
    result += toParseChars[toParseChars.Length-1];
    Console.WriteLine(result);
}

The idea here is that we want to create a binary word for each possible hyphen. So, if we have A-B-C-D (three hyphens), we create binary words 000, 001, 010, 011, 100, 101, 110, and 111. Note that if we have n hyphens, we need 2^n binary words.

Then each word maps to the output you desire by inserting the hyphen where we have a '1' in our word (000 -> ABCD, 001 -> ABC-D, 010 -> AB-CD, etc). I didn't test the code above, but this is at least one way to solve the problem for fully hyphenated words.

Disclaimer: I didn't actually test the code

share|improve this answer
    
My apologies for not clarifying that A B C D could be words of any length. – John Mar 24 at 5:51
    
I did try the code (few errors: ToCharArray should be ToArray, and some typos). Unfortunately it does not produce the desired results (result was "AD, A-D, A-BD, A-B-D, A-BCD, A-BC-D, A-B-CD, A-B-C-D"). I Appreciate you taking the time to answer. – John Mar 24 at 7:29
    
Ah yes, the ToString method wouldn't append 0's to the front of binChars. Sorry, it was late when I typed this up. The idea is simple enough though (mapping binary string to result strings), and that's really what I wanted to throw out there. – mwm314 Mar 24 at 12:55

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