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I got this function to get a cssPath :

var cssPath = function (el) {
  var path = [];

  while (
    (el.nodeName.toLowerCase() != 'html') && 
    (el = el.parentNode) &&
    path.unshift(el.nodeName.toLowerCase() + 
      (el.id ? '#' + el.id : '') + 
      (el.className ? '.' + el.className.replace(/\s+/g, ".") : ''))
  );
  return path.join(" > ");
}
console.log(cssPath(document.getElementsByTagName('a')[123]));

But i got something like this :

html > body > div#div-id > div.site > div.clearfix > ul.choices > li

But to be totally right, it should look like this :

html > body > div#div-id > div.site:nth-child(1) > div.clearfix > ul.choices > li:nth-child(5)

Did someone have any idea to implement it simply in javascript ?

share|improve this question
2  
It should probably be :eq(1) or :nth-child(2) rather than [1] if you want a CSS selector. –  Andy E Sep 1 '10 at 16:26
    
Or just give the element an unique ID with JavaScript? I can see why cssPath might be useful as a FireBug plugin or something, but for regular code, introducing ID's is the most effective. –  BGerrissen Sep 1 '10 at 16:59
    
In fact, I do believe there's a FireBug plugin that gets a cssPath from an element called FireFinder ;oP –  BGerrissen Sep 1 '10 at 17:01
    
Yes you're right Andy. This syntax looks like a bad mix between CSS selector and XPath. I should fix it. –  jney Sep 1 '10 at 21:45
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2 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

To always get the right element, you will need to use :nth-child() or :nth-of-type() for selectors that do not uniquely identify an element. So try this:

var cssPath = function(el) {
    if (!(el instanceof Element)) return;
    var path = [];
    while (el.nodeType === Node.ELEMENT_NODE) {
        var selector = el.nodeName.toLowerCase();
        if (el.id) {
            selector += '#' + el.id;
        } else {
            var sib = el, nth = 1;
            while (sib.nodeType === Node.ELEMENT_NODE && (sib = sib.previousSibling) && nth++);
            selector += ":nth-child("+nth+")";
        }
        path.unshift(selector);
        el = el.parentNode;
    }
    return path.join(" > ");
}

You could add a routine to check for unique elements in their corresponding context (like TITLE, BASE, CAPTION, etc.).

share|improve this answer
    
Yes it looks great. Is it compliant with IE too ? –  jney Sep 1 '10 at 21:45
    
@jney: If you mean the :nth-child() selector, then no. –  Gumbo Sep 1 '10 at 21:57
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The answer above actually has a bug in it — the while loop breaks prematurely when it encounters a non-element node (e.g. a text node) resulting in an incorrect CSS selector.

Here's an improved version that fixes that problem plus:

  • Stops when it encounters the first ancestor element with an id assigned to it
  • Uses nth-of-type() to make the selectors more readable
    var cssPath = function(el) {
        if (!(el instanceof Element)) 
            return;
        var path = [];
        while (el.nodeType === Node.ELEMENT_NODE) {
            var selector = el.nodeName.toLowerCase();
            if (el.id) {
                selector += '#' + el.id;
                path.unshift(selector);
                break;
            } else {
                var sib = el, nth = 1;
                while (sib = sib.previousElementSibling) {
                    if (sib.nodeName.toLowerCase() == selector)
                       nth++;
                }
                if (nth != 1)
                    selector += ":nth-of-type("+nth+")";
            }
            path.unshift(selector);
            el = el.parentNode;
        }
        return path.join(" > ");
     }
share|improve this answer
    
:nth-of-type() works differently from :nth-child() - sometimes it isn't a simple matter of replacing one with the other. –  BoltClock Aug 31 '12 at 21:30
1  
if (nth != 1) is not good, to have an ultra-specific path you should always use child even if it is 1. –  Sych Jan 26 '13 at 4:48
    
@Sych, why? Seems to work fine and adding nth-of-type to 'html' would not work for example. –  jtblin Sep 21 '13 at 7:47
    
@jtblin, because, for example, .container span would catch all span's inside .container, but .container span:nth-of-type(1) would catch only the first one, and this is probably the intended behavior. –  Sych Oct 25 '13 at 21:05
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