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This is my current PS1 prompt definition from by .bashrc:

PS1='\[\033[01;33m\]★ \[\033[01;30m\]\w \[\033[32m\]\$ \[\033[m\]'

My command prompt works great and I love it, but I would like to add one more little thing. I would really like to be able to have the text I enter (commands at the prompt) bold.

I know I could change the last escape code to be:

\[\033[01m\]

Which would make the command prompt text I enter bold, but it also does funny (undesirable) things with the output of entered commands.

Is there a way to do this? If so, how?

I am running gnome-terminal in Ubuntu.

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If there is already an answer in bash, then this is probably a Super User questions. The answer may involve hacking bash, which would be a Stack Overflow topic. –  dmckee Sep 1 '10 at 16:53
    
I'm not sure which it would be. I haven't been able to find anything yet. Would it be a good idea to post it there too? –  chadgh Sep 1 '10 at 16:56
    
"...but it also does funny (undesirable) things with the output of entered commands...". Some applications set colors on their own, like ls. You can't really avoid that. –  Lekensteyn Sep 1 '10 at 17:03
    
No. Don't double post. If a quorum of high rep users decides this is better on Super User, they fan migrate it there. I'm "high rep" for that purpose, but am holding my vote for now... –  dmckee Sep 1 '10 at 17:27
    
@dmckee: Good to know. I had no idea that was the way it worked. I will wait patiently for a decision or answer. –  chadgh Sep 1 '10 at 18:02

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted
+50

I was looking to do this too. I found an answer here: https://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php/Color_Bash_Prompt#Different_colors_for_text_entry_and_console_output

Add this line to your ~/.bashrc which will reset the color that you set in your PS1 variable before displaying your command's output:

trap 'echo -ne "\e[0m"' DEBUG

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