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Can you declare a function like this...

function ihatefooexamples(){
  return "boo-foo!";
};

And then redeclare it somewhat like this...

if ($_GET['foolevel'] == 10){
  function ihatefooexamples(){
    return "really boo-foo";
  };
};

Is it possible to overwrite a function that way?

Any way?

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9 Answers 9

up vote 25 down vote accepted

This is where you should take advantage of OOP, specifically polymorphism.

interface Fooable
{
  public function ihatefooexamples();
}

class Foo implements Fooable
{
  public function ihatefooexamples()
  {
    return "boo-foo!";
  }
}

class FooBar implements Fooable
{
  public function ihatefooexamples()
  {
    return "really boo-foo";
  }
}

$foo = new Foo();

if ( 10 == $_GET['foolevel'] )
{
  $foo = new FooBar();
}

echo $foo->ihatefooexamples();
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2  
+1 for solving the actual problem, rather than simply trying to answer the exact question... –  ircmaxell Sep 1 '10 at 17:52
2  
The only change I would make would to put the $foo = new Foo() in an else block, in case either the constructor (a) is expensive, or (b) has side-effects. –  Austin Hyde Sep 1 '10 at 18:02
    
@Austin - if b ever happens, then you've developed your class wrong. Instantiating objects via new should be idempotent. And I'd say a is extremely rare. –  Peter Bailey Sep 1 '10 at 18:33
    
In the case where the output stays "foo-boo" and has just "really" added to it, I'd rather use a Decorator than a completely new Strategy –  Gordon Sep 1 '10 at 20:10
    
@Gordon You're over-analyzing. I think it's pretty clear that this is just an example. –  Peter Bailey Sep 1 '10 at 20:34

Have a look at override_function to override the functions.

override_function — Overrides built-in functions

Example:

override_function('test', '$a,$b', 'echo "DOING TEST"; return $a * $b;');
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1  
this is a good point but if the function is large, its not nice to pass in strings that long! :(, another point is that this can only be used for built in functions and not user defined! –  RobertPitt Sep 1 '10 at 17:39
    
@RobertPitt: Agreed this is what we have at the moment and your solution looks good but that depends on php version being used. –  Sarfraz Sep 1 '10 at 17:41
    
Why would you not want to be on a php version < 5.3.0? unless your building a script that would be retailed/released to the public then you have a valid point. –  RobertPitt Sep 1 '10 at 17:44
    
@RobertPitt: I am using 5.3 and hope OP is using the same too :) –  Sarfraz Sep 1 '10 at 17:46

Monkey patch in namespace php >= 5.3

A less evasive method than modifying the interpreter is the monkey patch.

Monkey patching is the art of replacing the actual implementation with a similar "patch" of your own.

Ninja skills

Before you can monkey patch like a PHP Ninja we first have to understand PHPs namespaces.

Since PHP 5.3 we got introduced to namespaces which you might at first glance denote to be equivalent to something like java packages perhaps, but it's not quite the same. Namespaces, in PHP, is a way to encapsulate scope by creating a hierarchy of focus, especially for functions and constants. As this topic, fallback to global functions, aims to explain.

If you don't provide a namespace when calling a function, PHP first looks in the current namespace then moves down the hierarchy until it finds the first function declared within that prefixed namespace and executes that. For our example if you are calling print_r(); from namespace My\Awesome\Namespace; What PHP does is to first look for a function called My\Awesome\Namespace\print_r(); then My\Awesome\print_r(); then My\print_r(); until it finds the PHP built in function in the global namespace \print_r();.

You will not be able to define a function print_r($object) {} in the global namespace because this will cause a name collision since a function with that name already exists.

Expect a fatal error to the likes of:

Fatal error: Cannot redeclare print_r()

But nothing stops you, however, from doing just that within the scope of a namespace.

Patching the monkey

Say you have a script using several print_r(); calls.

Example:

<?php
     print_r($some_object);
     // do some stuff
     print_r($another_object);
     // do some other stuff
     print_r($data_object);
     // do more stuff
     print_r($debug_object);

But you later change your mind and you want the output wrapped in <pre></pre> tags instead. Ever happened to you?

Before you go and change every call to print_r(); consider monkey patching instead.

Example:

<?php
    namespace MyNamespace {
        function print_r($object) 
        {
            echo "<pre>", \print_r($object, true), "</pre>"; 
        }

        print_r($some_object);
        // do some stuff
        print_r($another_object);
        // do some other stuff
        print_r($data_object);
        // do more stuff
        print_r($debug_object);
    }

Your script will now be using MyNamespace\print_r(); instead of the global \print_r();

Works great for mocking unit tests.

nJoy!

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You cannot redeclare any functions in PHP. You can, however, override them. Check out overriding functions as well as renaming functions in order to save the function you're overriding if you want.

So, keep in mind that when you override a function, you lose it. You may want to consider keeping it, but in a different name. Just saying.

Also, if these are functions in classes that you're wanting to override, you would just need to create a subclass and redeclare the function in your class without having to do rename_function and override_function.

Example:

rename_function('mysql_connect', 'original_mysql_connect' );
override_function('mysql_connect', '$a,$b', 'echo "DOING MY FUNCTION INSTEAD"; return $a * $b;');
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2  
This requires APD PECL extension, and is outdated. Latest version is from 2004. pecl.php.net/package/apd –  jperelli Jul 26 '13 at 14:32

short answer is no, you can't overwrite a function once its in the PHP function scope.

your best of using anonymous functions like so

$ihatefooexamples = function()
{
  return "boo-foo!";
}

//...
unset($ihatefooexamples);
$ihatefooexamples = function()
{
   return "really boo-foo";
}

http://php.net/manual/en/functions.anonymous.php

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Do you really need the unset? I know it isn't bad to do, just curious (I haven't tried this specific case)... –  ircmaxell Sep 1 '10 at 17:55
1  
@ircmax You don't have to use unset –  NullUserException Sep 1 '10 at 18:01
    
I haven't a clue on anonymous functions I just know they how to create them but iv'e never played with them, i understand that unset can be costly if overused but depending on the size of the function it might be better ! –  RobertPitt Sep 1 '10 at 18:35
    
I don't know why this didn't get the merit it required. It is the cleanest, usable and sensible approach. The OP didn't ask for an OOP approach (quite the contrary in fact), and the 3rd-party functionality simply does not work, hence this is the only solution. –  Christian Sep 5 '11 at 1:09
    
This is not overriding any function it's merely changing the value of a variable. you would've had the same result leaving the closure (anonymous function) part out completely. This does not answer the question! –  nickl- Aug 26 '12 at 6:17

You could use the PECL extension

but that is bad practise in my opinion. You are using functions, but check out the Decorator design pattern. Can borrow the basic idea from it.

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I would include all functions of one case in an include file, and the others in another include.

For instance simple.inc would contain function boofoo() { simple } and really.inc would contain function boofoo() { really }

It helps the readability / maintenance of your program, having all functions of the same kind in the same inc.

Then at the top of your main module

  if ($_GET['foolevel'] == 10) {
    include "really.inc";
  }
  else {
    include "simple.inc";
  }
share|improve this answer
    
Good luck figuring out which function in which file was called... –  Christian Sep 5 '11 at 1:07
    
If it is required (doesn't seem so) one can add a $iam = "really" or $iam = "simple" at the top of the include files. –  ring0 Sep 5 '11 at 15:45

No this will be a problem. PHP Variable Functions

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Are you trying to override a simple function or would you be able to achieve what you want through the use of classes and extending them with override functions?

A bit more background in what you are trying to do would help.

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i dont think this si what he is looking for but a point non the less. –  RobertPitt Sep 1 '10 at 17:42

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