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How to declare a one to one relationship using Entity Framework 4 Code First (POCO)?

I found this question http://stackoverflow.com/questions/2089395/one-to-one-relationships-in-entity-framework-4-v2-with-poco, but the article that the answer references was not useful (there is one line of code that is a 1-1 relationship, but no mention of how to define it).

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3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Are you just looking for something like this?

public class User
{
    public int Id { get; set; }
    public string Username { get; set; }
    public Profile Profile { get; set; }
    public int ProfileId { get; set; }
}

public class Profile
{
    public int Id { get; set; }
    public string FirstName { get; set; }
    public string LastName { get; set; }
    public string PostalCode { get; set; }
    // etc...
}

public class UserMapping : EntityConfiguration<User>
{
    public UserMapping()
    {
        this.HasKey(u => u.Id);
        this.Property(u => u.Username).HasMaxLength(32);

        // User has ONE profile.
        this.HasRequired(u => u.Profile);
    }
}

public class ProfileMapping : EntityConfiguration<Profile>
{
    public ProfileMapping()
    {
        this.HasKey(p => p.Id);
        this.Property(p => p.FirstName).HasMaxLength(32);
        this.Property(p => p.LastName).HasMaxLength(32);
        this.Property(p => p.PostalCode).HasMaxLength(6);
    }
}

EDIT: Yeah I didn't have VS in front of me but you need to add the following line in the UserMapping instead of the current HasRequired and also add a ProfileId property (instead of Profile_Id that you added):

this.HasRequired(u => u.Profile).HasConstraint((u, p) => u.ProfileId == p.Id);

I currently don't think there's a way around this, but I'm sure it'll change since we're only in CTP4. It'd be nice if I could say:

this.HasRequired(u => u.Profile).WithSingle().Map(
    new StoreForeignKeyName("ProfileId"));

This way I wouldn't have to include a ProfileId property. Maybe there is a way around this currently and it's still to early in the morning for me to think :).

Also remember to call .Include("Profile") if you want to include a "navigational property".

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Does this work for you? I cannot get it to work. I am not generating the database automatically as I have existing tables. My profile table has Id as PK and FK (as the relationship is 1:1). I take it that this is the same as you. If I try and run your code, I get an error: Invalid column name 'Profile_Id'. If I add that column to User (not that I want it there), user is returned but profile is null. The sql generated is : SELECT [Extent1].[Id] AS [Id], [Extent1].[Username] AS [Username], [Extent1].[Profile_Id] AS [Profile_Id] FROM [dbo].[Users] AS [Extent1] Any ideas? –  Paul Hiles Sep 2 '10 at 0:38
    
hmm. On second inspection, looks like this works fine on sqlce4, but not sql server 2010 unless I am missing something. –  Paul Hiles Sep 2 '10 at 1:56
    
@zaph0d - If you want to access a property that is "another entity", you need to "include" it. The way to do that would be context.Users.Include("Profile"). Profile is a "navigation property" that will require a JOIN in SQL. I've edited my post with the extra bit of info I forgot for profile. –  TheCloudlessSky Sep 2 '10 at 11:33
    
@zaph0d - I was going to suggest you post this on the MSDN forums as well to see if there is a better way, but I see you already did :). Perhaps you should link back to this SO post too. –  TheCloudlessSky Sep 2 '10 at 11:51
    
This approach isn't necessary in the released version, and is more complex and brittle than it needs to be. See my answer. –  Chris Moschini May 31 '12 at 16:59

Three methods:

A) Declare both classes with navigation properties to each other. Mark one of the tables (the dependent table) with the ForeignKey attribute on its Primary Key. EF infers 1-to-1 from this:

public class AppUser
{
    public int Id { get; set; }

    public string Username { get; set; }

    public OpenIdInfo OpenIdInfo { get; set; }
}

​public class OpenIdInfo
{
    [ForeignKey("AppUser")]
    public int Id { get; set; }

    public string OpenId { get; set; }

    public AppUser AppUser { get; set; }
}

http://weblogs.asp.net/manavi/archive/2011/05/01/associations-in-ef-4-1-code-first-part-5-one-to-one-foreign-key-associations.aspx

Notice that virtual is not necessary here.

Edit: You can include virtual on any of these properties or collections if you want to lazy-load them. This can result in infinite loops or loading the entire DB if you pass an object with lazy-loaded properties to, for example, the MVC JSON converter or anything else that walks the object hierarchy.

B) Declare an inheritance hierarchy with both table names explicitly stated, resulting in TPT and a shared Primary Key.

using System.ComponentModel.DataAnnotations;

[Table("AppUser")]
public class AppUser
{
    public int Id { get; set; }

    public string Username { get; set; }

    public OpenIdInfo OpenIdInfo { get; set; }
}

[Table("AdminUser")]      
public class AdminUser : AppUser
{
    public bool SuperAdmin { get; set; }
}

​ C) There are also 2 half-way methods of doing one-to-one in EF:

Entity-Splitting, where you have a single Class, but it's stored in a primary table, and 1 or more one-to-one related tables.

Table-Splitting, where you have a Class with multiple child Properties, that flatten out into a single table. For example a class with an Address property would have columns for its regular properties, like Id, and columns from the Address object, like Address_City, all stuffed into a single table.

Edit: Added method C

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public class User
{
    public int Id { get; set; }
    public string Username { get; set; }

    public virtual Profile Profile { get; set; }
}

public class Profile
{
    public int Id { get; set; }

    public int UserID { get; set; }

    public string FirstName { get; set; }
    public string LastName { get; set; }
    public string PostalCode { get; set; }
}

Add the virtual Profile and the UserID and I think that should get you there.

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2  
Wouldn't that be a one to many relationship? Question was about 1:1. –  saille Aug 9 '11 at 23:32
    
No it's not. it's 1:1 A user has 1 Profile in this example... If not i've misunderstood something completely. –  BjarkeCK Jun 8 '12 at 13:57

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