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When I read the source code from java.io.BufferedInputStream.getInIfOpen(), I am confused about why it wrote code like this:

/**
 * Check to make sure that underlying input stream has not been
 * nulled out due to close; if not return it;
 */
private InputStream getInIfOpen() throws IOException {
    InputStream input = in;
    if (input == null)
        throw new IOException("Stream closed");
    return input;
}

Why is it using the alias instead of using the field variable in directly like below:

/**
 * Check to make sure that underlying input stream has not been
 * nulled out due to close; if not return it;
 */
private InputStream getInIfOpen() throws IOException {
    if (in == null)
        throw new IOException("Stream closed");
    return in;
}

Can someone give a reasonable explanation?

share|improve this question
    
In Eclipse, you can't pause a debugger on an if statement. Might be a reason for that alias variable. Just wanted to throw that out there. I speculate, of course. – Debosmit Ray Mar 26 at 3:07
    
@DebosmitRay : Really can't pause on if statement? – rkosegi Mar 26 at 15:39
    
@rkosegi On my version of Eclipse, the problem is similar to this one. Might not be a very common occurrence. And anyway, I didn't meant it on a light note (clearly a bad joke). :) – Debosmit Ray Mar 27 at 2:43
up vote 118 down vote accepted

If you look at this code out of context there is no good explanation for that "alias". It is simply redundant code or poor code style.

But the context is that BufferedInputStream is a class that can be subclassed, and that it needs to work in a multi-threaded context.

The clue is that in is declared in FilterInputStream is protected volatile. That means that there is a chance that a subclass could reach in and assign null to in. Given that possibility, the "alias" is actually there to prevent a race condition.

Consider the code without the "alias"

private InputStream getInIfOpen() throws IOException {
    if (in == null)
        throw new IOException("Stream closed");
    return in;
}
  1. Thread A calls getInIfOpen()
  2. Thread A evaluates in == null and sees that in is not null.
  3. Thread B assigns null to in.
  4. Thread A executes return in. Which returns null because a is a volatile.

The "alias" prevents this. Now in is read just once by thread A. If thread B assigns null after thread A has in it doesn't matter. Thread A will either throw an exception or return a (guaranteed) non-null value.

share|improve this answer
11  
Which shows why protected variables are evil in a multi-threaded context. – Mick Mnemonic Mar 26 at 3:23
2  
It does indeed. However, AFAIK these classes go all the way back to Java 1.0. This is just another example of a poor design decision that could not be fixed for fear of breaking customer code. – Stephen C Mar 26 at 3:26
2  
@StephenC Thanks for the detailed explanation +1. So does that mean, we shouldn't be using protected variables in our code if it is multi-threaded? – Madhusudana Reddy Sunnapu Mar 26 at 3:29
3  
@MadhusudanaReddySunnapu The overall lesson is that in an environment where multiple threads may access the same state, you need to control that access somehow. That may be a private variable only accessible via setter, it could be a local guard like this, it could be by making the variable write-once in a threadsafe way. – Chris Hayes Mar 26 at 4:13
3  
@sam - 1) It doesn't need to explain all race conditions and states. The aim of the answer is to point out why this seemingly inexplicable code is in fact necessary. 2) How so? – Stephen C Mar 27 at 1:08

This is because the class BufferedInputStream is designed for multi-threaded usage.

Here, you see the declaration of in, which is placed in the parent class FilterInputStream:

protected volatile InputStream in;

Since it is protected, its value can be changed by any subclass of FilterInputStream, including BufferedInputStream and its subclasses. Also, it is declared volatile, which means that if any thread changes the value of the variable, this change will immediately be reflected in all other threads. This combination is bad, since it means the class BufferedInputStream has no way to control or know when in is changed. Thus, the value can even be changed between the check for null and the return statement in BufferedInputStream::getInIfOpen, which effectively makes the check for null useless. By reading the value of in only once to cache it in the local variable input, the method BufferedInputStream::getInIfOpen is safe against changes from other threads, since local variables are always owned by a single thread.

There is an example in BufferedInputStream::close, which sets in to null:

public void close() throws IOException {
    byte[] buffer;
    while ( (buffer = buf) != null) {
        if (bufUpdater.compareAndSet(this, buffer, null)) {
            InputStream input = in;
            in = null;
            if (input != null)
                input.close();
            return;
        }
        // Else retry in case a new buf was CASed in fill()
    }
}

If BufferedInputStream::close is called by another thread while BufferedInputStream::getInIfOpen is executed, this would result in the race condition described above.

share|improve this answer
    
I agree, inasmuch as we're seeing things like compareAndSet(), CAS, etc. in the code and in the comments. I also searched the BufferedInputStream code and found numerous synchronized methods. So, it is intended for multi-threaded use, though I sure have never used it that way. Anyway, I think your answer is correct! – sparc_spread Mar 26 at 3:07
    
This probably makes sense because getInIfOpen() is only called from public synchronized methods of BufferedInputStream. – Mick Mnemonic Mar 26 at 3:11

This is such a short code, but, theoretically, in a multi-threaded environment, in may change right after the comparison, so the method could return something it didn't check (it could return null, thus doing the exact thing it was meant to prevent).

share|improve this answer
    
Am I correct if I say that the reference in might change between the time you call the method and return of the value (in a multi-threaded environment)? – Debosmit Ray Mar 26 at 3:03
    
Yes, you can say that. Ultimately the likelihood will really depend on the concrete case (all we know for a fact is that in can change anytime). – acdcjunior Mar 26 at 3:14

I believe capturing the class variable in to the local variable input is to prevent inconsistent behavior if in is change by another thread while getInIfOpen() is running.

Notice that the owner of in is the parent class and does not mark it as final.

This pattern is replicated in other parts of the class and seems to be reasonable defensive coding.

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