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I have a text file with entries representing build tags with version and build number in the same format as debian packages like this:

nimbox-apexer_1.0.0-12
nimbox-apexer_1.1.0-2
nimbox-apexer_1.1.0-1
nimbox-apexer_1.0.0-13 

Using a shell script I need to sort the above list by 'version-build' and get the last line, which in the above example is nimbox-apexer_1.1.0-2.

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5 Answers 5

Get the latest build with:

cat file.txt | sort -V | tail -n1

Now, to catch it into a variable:

BUILD=$(cat file.txt | sort -V | tail -n1)
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1  
If I introduce nimbox-apexer_1.10.0-9 and nimbox-apexer_1.9.0-1 in the list it provides the wrong result nimbox-apexer_1.9.0-1 when it should be nimbox-apexer_1.10.0-9 which is really the latest version. –  rmarimon Sep 2 '10 at 2:28
1  
No need for cat. –  Dennis Williamson Sep 2 '10 at 2:46
    
@marimon my bad, vorgot the -V switch, that I added just now. @Dennis Williamson, right, I just like using it that way... –  polemon Sep 2 '10 at 2:55
    
Nice, if you have a recent enough version of GNU sort. –  Jonathan Leffler Sep 3 '10 at 0:19
    
@Jonathan Leffler: Does it need to be that recent? I've been using it like that for a couple of years, iirc. –  polemon Sep 3 '10 at 15:10
sort -n -t "_" -k2.3 file | tail -1
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I don't understand fully the -n flag but having two periods does seem to be confusing. If I include nimbox-apexer_11.9.0-2 in the list it doesn't work as expected. –  rmarimon Sep 2 '10 at 3:53
    
I assume that is why the k2.3 is included so that sorting happens after the first 1.. –  rmarimon Sep 2 '10 at 4:00
cat file.txt | cut -d_ -f 2 | sed "s/-/./g" | sort -n -t . -k 1,2n -k 2,2n -k 3,3n  -k 4,3n

The 2n,3n are the number of characters considered relevant in that field. Increase them if you use really big version numbers...

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With GNU sort:

sort --version-sort file | tail -n -1

GNU tail doesn't like tail -1.

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I need to be running this script on linux and mac osx... so gnu sort would not work for me in the general way. –  rmarimon Sep 2 '10 at 3:54
    
You could also just install install homebrew as recommended in this answer –  Adam Gent Aug 19 '13 at 14:50

I haven't been able to find a simple way to do this. I've been looking at code to sort ip address, which is similar to my problem, and trying to change my situation to that one. This what I have come up with. Please tell me there is a simpler better way !!!

sed 's/^[^0-9]*\([0-9]*\)\.\([0-9]*\)\.\([0-9]*\)-\([0-9]*\)/\1.\2.\3.\4 &/' list.txt | \
  sort -t . -n -k 1,1 -k 2,2 -k 3,3 -k 4,4 | \
  sed 's/^[^ ]* \(.*\)/\1/' | \
  tail -n 1

So starting with this data:

nimbox-apexer_11.9.0-2
nimbox-apexer_1.10.0-9
nimbox-apexer_1.9.0-1
nimbox-apexer_1.0.0-12
nimbox-apexer_1.1.0-2
nimbox-apexer_1.1.0-1
nimbox-apexer_1.0.0-13

The first sed converts my problem into a sorting IPs problem keeping the original line to reverse the change at the end:

11.9.0.2 nimbox-apexer_11.9.0-2
1.10.0.9 nimbox-apexer_1.10.0-9
1.9.0.1 nimbox-apexer_1.9.0-1
1.0.0.12 nimbox-apexer_1.0.0-12
1.1.0.2 nimbox-apexer_1.1.0-2
1.1.0.1 nimbox-apexer_1.1.0-1
1.0.0.13 nimbox-apexer_1.0.0-13 

The sort orders the line using the first four numbers which in my case represent mayor.minor.release.build

1.0.0.12 nimbox-apexer_1.0.0-12
1.0.0.13 nimbox-apexer_1.0.0-13 
1.1.0.1 nimbox-apexer_1.1.0-1
1.1.0.2 nimbox-apexer_1.1.0-2
1.9.0.1 nimbox-apexer_1.9.0-1
1.10.0.9 nimbox-apexer_1.10.0-9
11.9.0.2 nimbox-apexer_11.9.0-2

The last sed eliminates the data used to sort

nimbox-apexer_1.0.0-12
nimbox-apexer_1.0.0-13 
nimbox-apexer_1.1.0-1
nimbox-apexer_1.1.0-2
nimbox-apexer_1.9.0-1
nimbox-apexer_1.10.0-9
nimbox-apexer_11.9.0-2

Finally tail gets the last line which is the one I need.

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