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Suppose you have a method like this that computes the maximum of a Collection for some ToIntFunction:

static <T> void foo1(Collection<? extends T> collection, ToIntFunction<? super T> function) {
    if (collection.isEmpty())
        throw new NoSuchElementException();
    int max = Integer.MIN_VALUE;
    T maxT = null;
    for (T t : collection) {
        int result = function.applyAsInt(t);
        if (result >= max) {
            max = result;
            maxT = t;
        }
    }
    // do something with maxT
}

With Java 8, this could be translated into

static <T> void foo2(Collection<? extends T> collection, ToIntFunction<? super T> function) {
    T maxT = collection.stream()
                       .max(Comparator.comparingInt(function))
                       .get();
    // do something with maxT
}

A disadvantage with the new version is that function.applyAsInt is invoked repeatedly for the same value of T. (Specifically if the collection has size n, foo1 invokes applyAsInt n times whereas foo2 invokes it 2n - 2 times).

Disadvantages of the first approach are that the code is less clear and you can't modify it to use parallelism.

Suppose you wanted to do this using parallel streams and only invoke applyAsInt once per element. Can this be written in a simple way?

share|improve this question
3  
Suppose list is (1, 2, 3, 4, 5) and 1 is the biggest. foo2 compares 1 with 2, then 1 with 3, then 1 with 4, then 1 with 5. Each time you compare 1 with something you need to call applyAsInt. In general if there are n elements, there will be n - 1 comparisons. Since each comparison calls the method on 2 elements, it's 2n - 2. – Paul Boddington Mar 26 at 15:09
2  
@MuhammadHewedy No, Paul is right, it is applied 2n-2 times because to compare the elements, you must apply the function. So you will apply the function 2 times for the same element. When you reduce a, b, c, you will compare f(a) f(b) and f(b) f(c), so 4 times = 2*3-2. – Tunaki Mar 26 at 15:19
1  
@MuhammadHewedy ideone.com/3923a8 – Paul Boddington Mar 26 at 15:20
1  
@MuhammadHewedy Hmm, isn't 2 * (n - 1) = 2n - 2? :D – Tunaki Mar 26 at 17:48
1  
Don't call get(), call one of the safe methods like orElse(), ifPresent(), etc. – Brian Goetz Mar 26 at 19:28
up vote 10 down vote accepted

You can use a custom collector that keeps running pair of the maximum value and the maximum element:

static <T> void foo3(Collection<? extends T> collection, ToIntFunction<? super T> function) {
    class Pair {
        int max = Integer.MIN_VALUE;
        T maxT = null;
    }
    T maxT = collection.stream().collect(Collector.of(
        Pair::new,
        (p, t) -> {
            int result = function.applyAsInt(t);
            if (result >= p.max) {
                p.max = result;
                p.maxT = t;
            }
        }, 
        (p1, p2) -> p2.max > p1.max ? p2 : p1,
        p -> p.maxT
    ));
    // do something with maxT
}

One advantage is that this creates a single Pair intermediate object that is used through-out the collecting process. Each time an element is accepted, this holder is updated with the new maximum. The finisher operation just returns the maximum element and disgards the maximum value.

share|improve this answer
3  
It's probably worth pointing out that if you run this in parallel you'll get more than one Pair object instantiated. – Paul Boddington Mar 26 at 17:35
3  
You might want to use if (result >= p.max) instead of if (result > p.max). Otherwise you end up with null in the (admittedly unlikely) event that all of the elements actually map to Integer.MIN_VALUE. Alternatively, you can use Integer max = null; and if (p.max == null || result > p.max). – ruakh Mar 26 at 19:31
1  
@ruakh Ha yes thanks! That's a very interesting comment. I edited with that. – Tunaki Mar 26 at 19:34
1  
@ruakh That comment also applies to the question. Really good point. I'll edit. – Paul Boddington Mar 26 at 19:37
    
Using >= has the disadvantage of not returning the first maximum value, if there are multiple occurrences. Might be irrelevant for the specific use case, but it’s not doing the same as the original Stream.max. If you want to avoid the boxing to Integer, you could also use long max=Long.MIN_VALUE;, I doubt that using long comparison instead of int comparison has any performance impact and the result still will be T. – Holger Mar 29 at 18:52

As I stated in the comments I would suggest introducing an intermediate datastructure like:

static <T> void foo2(Collection<? extends T> collection, ToIntFunction<? super T> function) {
  if (collection.isEmpty()) {
    throw new IllegalArgumentException();
  }
  class Pair {
    final T value;
    final int result;

    public Pair(T value, int result) {
      this.value = value;
      this.result = result;
    }

    public T getValue() {
      return value;
    }

    public int getResult() {
      return result;
    }
  }
  T maxT = collection.stream().map(t -> new Pair(t, function.applyAsInt(t)))
                     .max(Comparator.comparingInt(Pair::getResult)).get().getValue();
  // do something with maxT
}
share|improve this answer

Another way would be to use a memoized version of function:

static <T> void foo2(Collection<? extends T> collection, 
    ToIntFunction<? super T> function, T defaultValue) {

    T maxT = collection.parallelStream()
        .max(Comparator.comparingInt(ToIntMemoizer.memoize(function)))
        .orElse(defaultValue);

    // do something with maxT

}

Where ToIntMemoizer.memoize(function) code would be as follows:

public class ToIntMemoizer<T> {

    private final Map<T, Integer> cache = new ConcurrentHashMap<>();

    private ToIntMemoizer() {
    }

    private ToIntFunction<T> doMemoize(ToIntFunction<T> function) {
        return input -> cache.computeIfAbsent(input, function::apply);
    }

    public static <T> ToIntFunction<T> memoize(ToIntFunction<T> function) {
        return new ToIntMemoizer<T>().doMemoize(function);
    }
}

This uses a ConcurrentHashMap to cache already computed results. If you don't need to support parallelism, you can perfectly use a HashMap.

One disadvantage is that the result of the function needs to be boxed/unboxed. On the other hand, as the function is memoized, a result will be computed only once for each repeated element of the collection. Then, if the function is invoked with a repeated input value, the result will be returned from the cache.

share|improve this answer
2  
I like this idea. – Muhammad Hewedy Mar 27 at 17:37
    
I guess, boxing is not the most problematic thing here. CHM has quite a big overhead, so you will need really slow ToIntFunction to overweigh it. Not to mention additional memory. – Tagir Valeev Mar 28 at 19:10
    
@TagirValeev I totally agree. This approach only makes sense when the function is quite slow, which should be the case, since the question explicitly specifies that the stream is parallel. It should also make sense if the list contains many repeated elements and the function is not super fast. – Federico Peralta Schaffner Mar 28 at 20:16

If you don't mind using third-party library, my StreamEx optimizes all these cases in special methods like maxByInt and so on. So you can simply use:

static <T> void foo3(Collection<? extends T> collection, ToIntFunction<? super T> function) {
    T maxT = StreamEx.of(collection).parallel()
                       .maxByInt(function)
                       .get();
    // do something with maxT
}

The implementation uses reduce with mutable container. This probably abuses API a little, but works fine for sequential and parallel streams and unlike collect solution defers the container allocation to the first accumulated element (thus no container is allocated if parallel subtask covers no elements which occurs quite often if you have the filtering operation upstream).

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