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I am trying to figure out what == sign means in this program?

int main()
{
    int x = 2, y = 6, z = 6;        
    x = y == z;
    printf("%d", x);
}
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1  
Well, what does it print? What does it print for other values of y and z (and x, for completeness)? –  Kobi Sep 2 '10 at 5:23
6  
It's clearer to understand if written like this: x=(y==z); –  UpTheCreek Sep 2 '10 at 5:25
1  
In your example, since y is equal to z, it will print 1. If y is not equal to z, it will print 0. –  BillP3rd Sep 2 '10 at 6:29
2  
guess this is homework, since we have seen the exact same bad example code some days ago, don't we? –  Jens Gustedt Sep 2 '10 at 6:48

8 Answers 8

up vote 20 down vote accepted

The == operator tests for equality. For example:

if ( a == b )
    dosomething();

And, in your example:

x = y == z;

x is true (1) if y is equal to z. If y is not equal to z, x is false (0).

A common mistake made by novice C programmers (and a typo made by some very experienced ones as well) is:

if ( a = b )
    dosomething();

In this case, b is assigned to a then evaluated as a boolean expression. Sometimes a programmer will do this deliberately but it's bad form. Another programmer reading the code won't know if it was done intentionally (rarely) or inadvertently (much more likely). A better construct would be:

if ( (a = b) == 0 )   // or !=
    dosomething();

Here, b is assigned to a, then the result is compared with 0. The intent is clear. (Interestingly, I've worked with C# programmers who have never written pure C and couldn't tell you what this does.)

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1  
+1 for not mentioning Yoda conditions. –  dan04 Sep 2 '10 at 5:35
    
For completeness, the value of y == z is either 1 or 0. So "x is true (non-zero)..." is better replaced with "x is 1 ...". –  Alok Singhal Sep 2 '10 at 5:55
2  
That is true but it wasn't always true. I started with C before the ANSI standard existed. K&R didn't specify the result of relational operators other than to say they determine the "truth or falsehood of the result" (p. 38). They do go on to say that the "unary negation operator ! converts a non-zero or true operand into 0, and a 0 or false operand into 1." Since K&R was the only standard at the time, I learned not to make assumptions about the results of boolean expressions. Draft ANSI C (X3.159.198x) fixed this in "3.3.8 Relational operators" and "3.3.9 Equality operators." –  BillP3rd Sep 2 '10 at 6:18
    
int war = 0; if (war = 1) { launchnuke(); } unforgivable typo. –  user142019 Aug 20 '11 at 15:45

It is "equals" operator.

In the above example, x is assigned the result of equality test (y == z) expression. So, if y is equal to z, x will be set to 1 (true), otherwise 0 (false). Because C (pre-C99) does not have a boolean type, the expression evaluates to an integer.

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Downvote? I'd love an explanation. –  Alex B Sep 2 '10 at 5:30
    
I didn't downvote, but off the top of my head C99 does have a boolean type via. stdbool.h - it's an actual compiler supported type, not just an int or enum ((int) true == 1 still holds, though). Devs do not have to use it. –  detly Sep 2 '10 at 5:37
    
@delty, probably should clarify that I mean C89. –  Alex B Sep 2 '10 at 5:47
2  
@detly: No, the standard defines the type _Bool, as the type to be used by the user (6.2.5.2). It also defines that <stdbool.h> defines the macro bool to expand to _Bool (which then is still the name appearing in error messages and warnings. Clause 7.1.3.1 makes _Bool a reserved identifier, but that does not mean a program should not use it – it means a program is not allowed to introduce a definition for this name itself. The goal is to have a name space for compiler writeres and future standard extensions. (The names _Complex and _Imaginary are meant for the user, too.) –  Christopher Creutzig Sep 3 '10 at 8:34
2  
Oh, and the standard explicitly says that undefining bool, true, and false is fine, while changing _Bool leads to undefined behavior. –  Christopher Creutzig Sep 3 '10 at 8:36

Equality. It returns 1 if the operands are equal, 0 otherwise.

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== means "is euual to". This operator has higher precedece than = (equal to) operator. So the equation x = y == z; will try to assign result of y==z to variable x. which is 1 in this case.

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1  
Thanks for mentioning precedence. Another potential minefield for novice C programmers. +1 –  BillP3rd Sep 2 '10 at 5:37
int main() 
{ 
    int x = 2, y = 6, z = 6;         
    x = y == z; 
    printf("%d", x); 
} 

let`s start like this:

 x = (6==6)

It asks is 6 equivalent to 6?: true

x = true, but since x is an int, x= 1 The new value of x is 1.

The following is printed:

1

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It's saying

X will equal either true/1 or false/0.

another way to look at that line is this:

x =  ( is y equal to true? then true/1 or false/0 )
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== operator used for equality.. here in u r example if y is equal to z then x will hav true value otherwise x will hav false

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Think about it like this:

= means give something a value.

== means check if it is equal to a value.

For example

int val = 5; //val is 5
//= actually changes val to 3
val = 3; 

//== Tests if val is 3 or not. 
//note: it DOES NOT CHANGE the value of val.
val == 3; 

int new_val = val == 3; //new_val will be 1, because the test is true

//the above statement is the same as
bool is_val_3 = false;
if( val == 3 )
   is_val_3 = true;
int new_val;
new_val = is_val_3;

//putting it together, 
val = new_val == 2; //sets val to 0. do you understand why now?
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