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I have a query similar in nature to the following in a stored procedure that has a single parameter:

SELECT
    ID,
    DepartmentID,
    FileName
FROM
    Document
-- conditional join from here
JOIN
    AllowedDepartmentList ON DepartmentID = AllowedDepartmentList.ID 
                          AND @IsAdmin = 'false'

The parameter is @IsAdmin with the data type bit.

The two tables I work with is the Document table (see structure in query above), and the AllowedDepartmentList that contains a single int column.

I use this query to filter the returned results of the Document table with join. I do not use the WHERE DepartmentID IN() clause, because the AllowedDepartmentList can be as long as 600-700 items (too much for IN() to handle with good performance in a potentially 1M record table) So I filter using a join, but the filtering should only execute, if the @IsAdmin parameter is false. Like the lines after the -- conditional join from here comment weren't even there.

I tried the query above but it produces no records. I suspect I'm using the wrong type of join, but I'm stuck.

share|improve this question
up vote 3 down vote accepted

You could use a left join in combination of a where that either requires admin privileges, or a match on the join

SELECT
    ID,
    DepartmentID,
    FileName
FROM
    Document
-- conditional join from here
LEFT JOIN
    AllowedDepartmentList ON DepartmentID = AllowedDepartmentList.ID 
WHERE
    @IsAdmin = 'true' OR AllowedDepartmentList.ID IS NOT NULL
share|improve this answer
1  
Note, that jhilden's suggestion is more efficient, since you'd save yourself from a join in the situations where it's not needed. I do, however, understand your argument of keeping just one query. – Mads Nielsen Mar 26 at 22:39
    
Thanks a lot, this seems to be OK, I gotta test it. And yes, you're right, we also have to test if the extra joins cause so much overhead that it's worth duplicating the code. – Daniel Mar 26 at 22:45
    
I accepted your answer as we have implemented this solution for testing purposes. It works as needed and gets the job done, but performance should be measured. There are many other answers that fit the bill, so thanks for everyone who took the time to fiddle with my problem. – Daniel Mar 27 at 19:17

As a general rule, put your parameters into WHERE clauses VS joins. A somewhat simple solution would be to have a TVF or sproc that runs two completely different queries. something like this:

IF (@isAdmin = 0) --notice I used a SQL bool vs a string of 'false'
BEGIN
    SELECT
        ID,
        DepartmentID,
        FileName
    FROM
        Document
    JOIN
        AllowedDepartmentList ON DepartmentID = AllowedDepartmentList.ID;
END;
ELSE
   --@IsAdmin is not false, so don't join
    SELECT
        ID,
        DepartmentID,
        FileName
    FROM
        Document;
END;
share|improve this answer
    
This is what I tried to avoid: duplicating the select. The exact select in our SP is a lot more complicated (like 150 rows) and gets very ugly if the whole shebang is duplicated... not to mention future modifications. – Daniel Mar 26 at 22:32
    
@Daniel If the whole shebang is 150 rows all the more reason to have an efficient query. How hard can a copy paste and remove a join be? – Paparazzi Mar 27 at 4:35
    
You're absolutely right in this matter. We will have to do some stress test on real data to figure the best answer. I was merely looking for an alternative to code duplication, but I never expected to get so many good suggestions (including staying on the current track, just as jhilden - and you - suggested). – Daniel Mar 27 at 18:54

you can use exists condition, like this:

SELECT
 ID,
 DepartmentID,
 FileName
FROM Document
WHERE exists(
 SELECT 1 from AllowedDepartmentList 
 WHERE DepartmentID = AllowedDepartmentList.ID) 
OR @IsAdmin = 'true'
share|improve this answer
    
How does the performance compare to JOIN? – Daniel Mar 26 at 22:54
1  
I'm think it is faster, especially if you use additional conditions, but you must try. join is to get data, exist is perfect for you :) – Adam Silenko Mar 26 at 23:00
    
Join can cause records multiplication, exists not. – Adam Silenko Mar 26 at 23:05
    
Hmmm. Interesting comments. Will definitely check this suggestion. – Daniel Mar 26 at 23:12

Another way to do this using Dynamic query. This will have good performance when compared to JOIN/Exists options

DECLARE @sql     NVARCHAR(max)='',
        @IsAdmin BIT = 1

SET @sql = '
SELECT
    ID,
    DepartmentID,
    FileName
FROM
    Document D
    ' + CASE WHEN @IsAdmin = 'false' THEN ' where exists (select 1 from  AllowedDepartmentList AD where D.DepartmentID = AD.ID ) ' ELSE '' END

--PRINT @sql 

exec sp_executesql @sql 

Dynamically framed query when @IsAdmin = 0

SELECT ID,
       DepartmentID,
       FileName
FROM   Document D
WHERE  EXISTS (SELECT 1
               FROM   AllowedDepartmentList AD
               WHERE  D.DepartmentID = AD.ID) 

Dynamically framed query when @IsAdmin = 0

SELECT ID,
       DepartmentID,
       FileName
FROM   Document D
share|improve this answer

The following query would help you

SELECT  ID
        ,DepartmentID
        ,FileName
FROM    Document
        LEFT JOIN   AllowedDepartmentList ON DepartmentID = AllowedDepartmentList.ID
WHERE   @isAdmin = 1
    OR  ( @isAdmin = 0 AND AllowedDepartmentList.ID IS NOT NULL)
share|improve this answer

add an AllowedDepartmentList.ID of like -1 for admin
pass a null or -1 for @adminID

ON isnull(@adminID, DepartmentID) = AllowedDepartmentList.ID

An OR (or @IsAdmin = 'true' ) is not efficient and this also just returns 1

share|improve this answer
    
This going to kill any index present on DepartmentID – Prdp Mar 27 at 5:26
    
@Prdp So, I assume AllowedDepartmentList.ID is a PK. It is no worse than an EXISTS with less code. – Paparazzi Mar 27 at 5:29

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