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Lets say I have a concrete class Class1 and I am creating an anonymous class out of it.

Object a = new Class1(){
        void someNewMethod(){
        }
      };

Now is there any way I could overload the constructor of this anonymous class. Like shown below

Object a = new Class1(){
        void someNewMethod(){
        }
        public XXXXXXXX(int a){
          super();
          System.out.println(a);
        }
      };

With something at xxxxxxxx to name the constructor?

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It's worth reading DoubleBraceInitialization –  Ken Kin Oct 27 at 2:17

9 Answers 9

up vote 138 down vote accepted

From the Java Language Specification, section 15.9.5.1:

An anonymous class cannot have an explicitly declared constructor.

Sorry :(

EDIT: As an alternative, you can create some final local variables, and include an instance initializer in the anonymous class. For example:

public class Test
{
    public static void main(String[] args) throws Exception
    {
        final int fakeConstructorArg = 10;

        Object a = new Object()
        {
            {
                System.out.println("arg = " + fakeConstructorArg);
            }
        };
    }
}

It's grotty, but it might just help you. Alternatively, use a proper nested class :)

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I actually hadn't seen your solution before I added it. –  Jon Skeet Dec 12 '08 at 11:07
11  
Arne, i believe him he didnt copy it. he knows enough of java to be fair enough to give credit when he would have copied it i think. –  Johannes Schaub - litb Dec 12 '08 at 16:42
1  
@Arne Great minds think alike! Take it as a compliment... –  user63904 Aug 23 '11 at 13:35
9  
OMG, did someone blamed THE Jon Skeet for copying? –  user Aug 15 '12 at 17:43
    
How would I be able to call a method in the superclass of Test from within println, when that method is overridden? –  Mark Jeronimus Feb 25 at 14:56

That is not possible, but you can add an anonymous initializer like this:

final int anInt = ...;
Object a = new Class1()
{
  {
    System.out.println(anInt);
  }

  void someNewMethod() {
  }
};

Don't forget final on declarations of local variables or parameters used by the anonymous class, as i did it for anInt.

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Here's another way around the problem:

public class Test{

    public static final void main(String...args){

        Thread t = new Thread(){

            private String message = null;

            Thread initialise(String message){

                this.message = message;
                return this;
            }

            public void run(){
                System.out.println(message);
            }
        }.initialise(args[0]).start();
    }
}
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8  
Nice solution, but the use of Thread here makes it somewhat misleading at first (for a moment I thought you were created a separate thread to initialize stuff!) –  scorpiodawg May 10 '12 at 17:47
2  
Note that after t is defined you can't call t.initialise() unless this function is defined in the class/interface type. –  Aram Kocharyan Mar 6 '13 at 12:29

You can have a constructor in the abstract class that accepts the init parameters. The Java spec only specifies that the anonymous class, which is the offspring of the (optionally) abstract class or implementation of an interface, can not have a constructor by her own right.

The following is absolutely legal and possible:

static abstract class Q{
    int z;
    Q(int z){ this.z=z;}
    void h(){
        Q me = new Q(1) {
        };
    }
}

If you have the possibility to write the abstract class yourself, put such a constructor there and use fluent API where there is no better solution. You can this way override the constructor of your original class creating an named sibling class with a constructor with parameters and use that to instantiate your anonymous class.

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Yes , It is right that you can not define construct in an Anonymous class but it doesn't mean that anonymous class don't have constructor. Confuse... Actually you can not define construct in an Anonymous class but compiler generates an constructor for it with the same signature as its parent constructor called. If the parent has more than one constructor, the anonymous will have one and only one constructor

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If you dont need to pass arguments, then initializer code is enough, but if you need to pass arguments from a contrcutor there is a way to solve most of the cases:

Boolean var= new anonymousClass(){
    private String myVar; //String for example

    @Overriden public Boolean method(int i){
          //use myVar and i
    }
    public String setVar(String var){myVar=var; return this;} //Returns self instane
}.setVar("Hello").method(3);
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In my case, a local class (with custom constructor) worked as an anonymous class:

Object a = getClass1(x);

public Class1 getClass1(int x) {
  class Class2 implements Class1 {
    void someNewMethod(){
    }
    public Class2(int a){
      super();
      System.out.println(a);
    }
  }
  Class1 c = new Class2(x);
  return c;
}
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It doesn't make any sense to have a named overloaded constructor in an anonymous class, as there would be no way to call it, anyway.

Depending on what you are actually trying to do, just accessing a final local variable declared outside the class, or using an instance initializer as shown by Arne, might be the best solution.

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The language could easily turn the "normal" constructor arguments into arguments for the anonymous class, if desired. The syntax for the constructor declaration would probably look pretty weird though... –  Jon Skeet Dec 12 '08 at 17:19
    
couldn't it just say to declare the constructor like if it were the base class constructor? i don't see problems with that –  Johannes Schaub - litb Dec 28 '08 at 6:48

Peter Norvig's The Java IAQ: Infrequently Answered Questions

http://norvig.com/java-iaq.html#constructors - Anonymous class contructors

http://norvig.com/java-iaq.html#init - Construtors and initialization

Summing, you can construct something like this..

public class ResultsBuilder {
    Set<Result> errors;
    Set<Result> warnings;

...

    public Results<E> build() {
        return new Results<E>() {
            private Result[] errorsView;
            private Result[] warningsView;
            {
                errorsView = ResultsBuilder.this.getErrors();
                warningsView = ResultsBuilder.this.getWarnings();
            }

            public Result[] getErrors() {
                return errorsView;
            }

            public Result[] getWarnings() {
                return warningsView;
            }
        };
    }

    public Result[] getErrors() {
        return !isEmpty(this.errors) ? errors.toArray(new Result[0]) : null;
    }

    public Result[] getWarnings() {
        return !isEmpty(this.warnings) ? warnings.toArray(new Result[0]) : null;
    }
}
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