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Suppose I have a namedtuple like this:

EdgeBase = namedtuple("EdgeBase", "left, right")

I want to implement a custom hash-function for this, so I create the following subclass:

class Edge(EdgeBase):
    def __hash__(self):
        return hash(self.left) * hash(self.right)

Since the object is immutable, I want the hash-value to be calculated only once, so I do this:

class Edge(EdgeBase):
    def __init__(self, left, right):
        self._hash = hash(self.left) * hash(self.right)

    def __hash__(self):
        return self._hash

This appears to be working, but I am really not sure about subclassing and initialization in Python, especially with tuples. Are there any pitfalls to this solution? Is there a recommended way how to do this? Is it fine? Thanks in advance.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 20 down vote accepted
class Edge(EdgeBase):
    def __new__(cls, left, right):
        self = super(Edge, cls).__new__(cls, left, right)
        self._hash = hash(self.left) * hash(self.right)
        return self

    def __hash__(self):
        return self._hash

__new__ is what you want to call here because tuples are immutable. Immutable objects are created in __new__ and then returned to the user, instead of being populated with data in __init__.

cls has to be passed twice to the super call on __new__ because __new__ is, for historical/odd reasons implicitly a staticmethod.

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2  
Why should I prefer this to my solution (this is not meant to be a cynical question, I really want to understand if there are any significant differences)? –  Björn Pollex Sep 2 '10 at 8:00
5  
Your solution doesn't use super, and therefore will break in any sort of multiple inheritance situation. It doesn't matter if you don't use MI; if someone else does, their code will break horribly. It's not difficult to avoid this issue by just using super everywhere. –  habnabit Sep 2 '10 at 8:06
    
It's also beneficial to add __slots__ = () to the class. Otherwise __dict__ will be created, negating memory efficiency of namedtuple. –  WGH Sep 25 '13 at 14:14
    
Setting __slots__ would break the assignment to _hash and clearly the class isn't readonly as that would also break the assignment to _hash regardless of whether it's done in __new__. –  tolomea Jan 5 at 21:59

The code in the question could benefit from a super call in the __init__ in case it ever gets subclassed in a multiple inheritance situation, but otherwise is correct.

class Edge(EdgeBase):
    def __init__(self, left, right):
        super(Edge, self).__init__(a, b)
        self._hash = hash(self.left) * hash(self.right)

    def __hash__(self):
        return self._hash

While tuples are readonly only the tuple parts of their subclasses are readonly, other properties may be written as usual which is what allows the assignment to _hash regardless of whether it's done in __init__ or __new__. You can make the subclass fully readonly by setting it's __slots__ to (), which has the added benefit of saving memory, but then you wouldn't be able to assign to _hash.

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