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I'm just curious why this code...

    enum Tile { Empty, White, Black };
    private string TileToString(Tile t)
    {
        switch (t)
        {
            case Tile.Empty:
                return ".";
            case Tile.White:
                return "W";
            case Tile.Black:
                return "B";
        }
    }

Throws that error. It's not possible for t to take on any other value, is it? Shouldn't the compiler be clever enough to figure that out?

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5 Answers 5

up vote 28 down vote accepted

No, you can use any int value converted to Tile. Try this:

Tile t = (Tile) 5;
string s = TileToString(t);

An enum is a set of names for numbers, effectively... but neither the compiler nor the CLR enforces that a value of the enum type has a name. It's a pain, but there it is...

I would suggest a default case which threw ArgumentException (or possibly ArgumentOutOfRangeException).

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3  
Since the method is private and therefore the caller should be passing only good stuff (because the author of the caller is you, not your users) I'd suggest a Debug.Fail("Bad caller! No biscuit!") or the like in the default case. –  Eric Lippert Sep 2 '10 at 14:43
3  
@Eric: Possibly... except then you still need to return something or throw an exception as well in order to satisfy the reachability requirements. Personally I've never been much of a fan of Debug.* - I tend to like to see the same exceptions in release mode as debug mode, but that may just be me. –  Jon Skeet Sep 2 '10 at 14:54

Jon is of course entirely correct that an enum can have any value of its underlying type, and therefore the switch is not exhaustive, and therefore there is a code path that does not return. However, that is not a complete analysis of the issue. Even if it were the case that the switch was exhaustive, you'd still get the error.

Try it:

int M(bool b) 
{
    switch(b)
    {
        case true : return 123;
        case false: return 456;
    } 
}

Or

int M(byte b) 
{
    switch(b)
    {
        case 0: case 1: case 2: ... all of them ... case 255: return 123;
    } 
}

In both these cases you'll get the same "reachable end point in non-void method" error.

This is simply an oversight in the "reachability checking" section of the C# specification. We define the end point of a switch statement as being reachable if it doesn't have a default section, period. There is no special dispensation for switches that exhaustively consume every possible value of their input. It's a corner case that the language designers missed, and it's never been nearly a high enough priority to fix it.

For three other interesting facts about analysis of switch statements, see:

http://ericlippert.com/2009/08/13/four-switch-oddities/

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Aw damn, I want to give you both checks now. Haha.. that's fair enough. I figured this was the real reason! –  Mark Sep 2 '10 at 17:25

This is because if your value for t does not match any of the switch cases it will fall out of the switch and thus your method will not return a value. You have, however, declared that it will return a string. You need to add a default into the switch, or a return null:

enum Tile { Empty, White, Black };
    private string TileToString(Tile t)
    {
        switch (t)
        {
            case Tile.Empty:
                return ".";
            case Tile.White:
                return "W";
            case Tile.Black:
                return "B";
        }
        return null;
    }
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"...if your value for t does not match any of the switch cases..." -- that's exactly my question. How can it not match any of the switch cases? –  Mark Sep 2 '10 at 8:24
    
Because, as Jon said, an Enum is actually just a representation of an integer. And since you can cast an integer to the Tile enum then you could technically pass in an invalid parameter. –  BeRecursive Sep 2 '10 at 9:11

Add the default case:

    enum Tile { Empty, White, Black };
    private string TileToString(Tile t)
    {
        switch (t)
        {
            case Tile.Empty:
                return ".";
            case Tile.White:
                return "W";
            case Tile.Black:
                return "B";
            default:
                return ".";
        }
    }
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I know the solution, was just trying to understand why this is necessary. –  Mark Sep 2 '10 at 8:25
2  
An enum can be extended with new values at any time. Therefor you need the default case to trap it, if not you'll end up with code that doesn't cover every possible case. –  Bart Sep 2 '10 at 8:28
switch (t)
{
    case Tile.Empty:
        return ".";
    case Tile.White:
        return "W";
    case Tile.Black:
        return "B";
    default: throw new NotSupportedException();
}

As Jon pointed out, the value is integral - an enum can be cast from any integral value. You just need to handle the default.

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