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I would like to know if Java provides an equivalent of .NET's classes of ManualResetEvent and WaitHandle, as I would like to write code that blocks for a given timeout unless an event is triggered.

The .NET classes of WaitHandle and ManualResetEvent provide a nice, hassle-free interface for that which is also thread-safe as far as I know, so what does Java has to offer?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Have you considered using wait/notify (the equivalent of Monitor.Wait and Monitor.Pulse) instead?

You'll want a little bit of checking to see whether you actually need to wait (to avoid race conditions) but it should work.

Otherwise, something like CountDownLatch may well do what you want.

EDIT: I've only just noticed that CountDownLatch is basically "single use" - you can't reset the count later, as far as I can see. You may want Semaphore instead. Use tryAcquire like this to wait with a timeout:

if (semaphore.tryAquire(5, TimeUnit.SECONDS)) {
   ...
   // Permit was granted before timeout
} else {
   // We timed out while waiting
}

Note that this is unlike ManualResetEvent in that each successful call to tryAcquire will reduce the number of permits - so eventually they'll run out again. You can't make it permanently "set" like you could with ManualResetEvent. (That would work with CountdownLatch, but then you couldn't "reset" it :)

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But what about the timeout aspect? From what I read in CountDownLatch's documentation, it doesn't seem to have a timeout value that I can intercept or stop before the timeout runs to the end. I would like to have a Java type that I can use to wait on for a timeout, and that can be intercepted before the timeout finishes, like a manual override. Also, hello Mr. Skeet! How are you doing? You probably get this a lot, but your book is great! –  Orca Sep 2 '10 at 10:30
    
@Voulnet: You'd call await(long timeout, TimeUnit unit) - that will block for the given timeout duration or return earlier if the latch is counted down to 0. Glad you like the book :) –  Jon Skeet Sep 2 '10 at 10:41
    
Yup, the solution must work beautifully since I only have one object waiting at any time. Thanks, Mr. Jon Skeet. –  Orca Sep 2 '10 at 11:21
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class ManualResetEvent {

  private final Object monitor = new Object();
  private volatile boolean open = false;

  public ManualResetEvent(boolean open) {
    this.open = open;
  }

  public void waitOne() throws InterruptedException {
    synchronized (monitor) {
      while (open==false) {
          monitor.wait();
      }
    }
  }

  public void set() {//open start
    synchronized (monitor) {
      open = true;
      monitor.notifyAll();
    }
  }

  public void reset() {//close stop
    open = false;
  }
}
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Note that this contains a nasty bug: if waitOne() is called before set() then the monitor will be entered and so a call to set() will block, resulting in deadlock. My hacky solution was to call monitor.wait(10) in a loop that exits the synchronization every iteration. –  Kent Boogaart May 7 '13 at 15:28
    
Actually, I might be wrong about that because apparently the monitor should be released during the wait, although my tests showed definite deadlock. Regardless, I have switched to using Semaphore for my use case. –  Kent Boogaart May 7 '13 at 15:59
    
could you get you tests with deadlock? –  user249654 May 29 '13 at 8:43
    
actually the question is Should all threads wake up when ManualResetEvent opening ? –  user249654 May 29 '13 at 8:57
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From: http://www.experts-exchange.com/Programming/Languages/Java/Q_22076798.html

Hi, you can achieve synchronization using the java.util.concurrent.Semaphore class (use 0 permit).

http://java.sun.com/j2se/1.5.0/docs/api/java/util/concurrent/Semaphore.html

Example below shows you how to solve the first sync problem, the other will be similar:

import java.util.concurrent.Semaphore;

class ScalesCommunication {

   private static Semaphore sem = new Semaphore(0);

   // called by thread 1
   void readLoop() {
      //...

      //after connection established, release semaphore (value incremented by 1)
      sem.release();
   }

   // called by thread 2
   String sendCommand(String command) {

       sem.acquire(); // thread waits here if sem value == 0

       // at this point connection is established
       //...
   }
}
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In theory, the ManualResetEvent class as given above is correct on Java 5 (but not earlier). Given the long history of incorrect (or inadequate) implementations of volatile, it seems wiser to me to add an additional synchronized block in reset() in order to generate a guaranteed write barrier, and ensure complete atomicity. The danger is that a read of "open" may pass a write of "open" on multi-processor Intel cpus. The advantage of the change given below: it may not be optimally efficient, but it does have the great advantage of being guaranteed to be not wrong, at very little additional cost.

   class ManualResetEvent {
      private final Object monitor = new Object();
      private volatile boolean open = false;

      public ManualResetEvent(boolean open) {
        this.open = open;   }

      public void waitOne() throws InterruptedException {
        synchronized (monitor) {
          while (open==false) {
              monitor.wait();
          }
        }
      }

      public void set() {//open start
        synchronized (monitor) {
          open = true;
          monitor.notifyAll();
        }
      }

      public void reset() {//close stop
        synchronized(monitor) {
           open = false;
        }
      }
   }

Thanks to the original poster.

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