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According to the tool PMD, the following is a bad practice:

String s = "" + 123; // bad 
String t = Integer.toString(456); // ok 


This is an inefficient way to convert any type to a `String`.

Why is it a bad thing to do?

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Apparently, for constants (static/final) "" + 123 is more efficient. For other values, using toString is more efficient. –  corgrath Sep 2 '10 at 12:50
    
"Static/final" can be misleading. A field must be both static and final to be considered a constant, and only for primitives and strings. (Local variables are never considered constant.) –  Chris Jester-Young Sep 2 '10 at 12:52
    
possible duplicate of Is conversion to String using ("" + <int value>) bad practice? –  McDowell Sep 2 '10 at 13:24

4 Answers 4

up vote 9 down vote accepted
String s = "" + 123; // bad     
String t = Integer.toString(456);

Will be compiled to:

String s = "123";
String t = Integer.toString(456);

so: "" +123 is obvious slightly better! Checked with JAD

public static void main(String args[])
{
//    0    0:ldc1            #16  <String "123">
//    1    2:astore_1
//    2    3:sipush          456
//    3    6:invokestatic    #18  <Method String Integer.toString(int)>
//    4    9:astore_2
//    5   10:getstatic       #24  <Field PrintStream System.out>
//    6   13:new             #30  <Class StringBuilder>
//    7   16:dup
//    8   17:aload_1
//    9   18:invokestatic    #32  <Method String String.valueOf(Object)>
//   10   21:invokespecial   #38  <Method void StringBuilder(String)>
//   11   24:aload_2
//   12   25:invokevirtual   #41  <Method StringBuilder StringBuilder.append(String)>
//   13   28:invokevirtual   #45  <Method String StringBuilder.toString()>
//   14   31:invokevirtual   #48  <Method void PrintStream.println(String)>
//   15   34:return
}

EDIT:

For non-constant values:

int i = 123;
String s = (new StringBuilder()).append(i).toString();
String t = Integer.toString(i);
System.out.println((new StringBuilder(String.valueOf(s))).append(t).toString());

    public static void main(String args[])
    {
    //    0    0:bipush          123
    //    1    2:istore_1
    //    2    3:new             #16  <Class StringBuilder>
    //    3    6:dup
    //    4    7:invokespecial   #18  <Method void StringBuilder()>
    //    5   10:iload_1
    //    6   11:invokevirtual   #19  <Method StringBuilder StringBuilder.append(int)>
    //    7   14:invokevirtual   #23  <Method String StringBuilder.toString()>
    //    8   17:astore_2
    //    9   18:iload_1
    //   10   19:invokestatic    #27  <Method String Integer.toString(int)>
    //   11   22:astore_3
    //   12   23:getstatic       #32  <Field PrintStream System.out>
    //   13   26:new             #16  <Class StringBuilder>
    //   14   29:dup
    //   15   30:aload_2
    //   16   31:invokestatic    #38  <Method String String.valueOf(Object)>
    //   17   34:invokespecial   #44  <Method void StringBuilder(String)>
    //   18   37:aload_3
    //   19   38:invokevirtual   #47  <Method StringBuilder StringBuilder.append(String)>
    //   20   41:invokevirtual   #23  <Method String StringBuilder.toString()>
    //   21   44:invokevirtual   #50  <Method void PrintStream.println(String)>
    //   22   47:return
    }
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I'm not sure I am following you. Did you prove that ""+123 is better than Integer.toString(123)? –  corgrath Sep 2 '10 at 12:26
3  
"" + 123 is a constant expression, which is evaluated already by the compiler to be "123". –  jarnbjo Sep 2 '10 at 12:31
1  
@stacker: "so: "" +123 is obvious slightly better" better is subjective the only obvious is that it's faster. It's sacrificing readability for performance with no known performance issues that premature optimization which is usually considered bad –  Rune FS Sep 2 '10 at 12:56
1  
do not perform micro optimization ,learnt from jon skeet –  Dead Programmer Sep 2 '10 at 13:12
1  
I think having this marked as the answer is misleading and unhelpful. As Chris Jester-Young points out, it's only faster in cases where the int is final. In order to produce better code, in cases where the int is final, you should have a corresponding string representation of that int as a string which is also final (this is what the compiler does automatically). "" + 123 is not at all "better", it is equivalent to declaring a new static string with the value "123" and has nothing to do with the int 123. –  Nathan Sep 17 '12 at 1:33

It is inefficient, as it involves an unneeded string concatenation, thus the creation of one or two extra String objects - although I believe the JIT can optimize it away.

To me the bigger problem is that the code is less clear. Calling toString is a standard idiom, understandable to every Java developer (hopefully :-), so you should prefer this.

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3  
Code transparency is crucial thing for me. –  Bart Sep 2 '10 at 12:55
2  
Code clarity should always go before micro optimizations. –  JesperE Sep 2 '10 at 13:25

It expands to "" + String.valueOf(yourObject) and thus does an unneeded concatenation. The concatenation involves allocating an extra string and doing an extra copy of the string's value.

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5  
and the tostring version clearly states the intend. "Convert this value to a string" –  Rune FS Sep 2 '10 at 12:13
1  
This is not strictly correct from a code generation point of view, so I will refrain from upvoting. It actually (for Java 6u20, which I tested with) expands to: new StringBuilder().append("").append(yourObject).toString(), assuming that yourObject is not constant. –  Chris Jester-Young Sep 2 '10 at 12:57
String s = "" + 123; // bad

The above code creates a temporary string, to combine "" and 123

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2  
Not so simple. See stacker's answer. If instead of 123 you have a non-constant value, then you'd be correct. –  Chris Jester-Young Sep 2 '10 at 12:54

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