Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

i found articles to that topic, but they dont solve my problem... I want to use UDP-Sockets for my XNA-Networkgame. And now i am trying to code a reliable Listenerthread, but there are some Problems.

If i use socket.Receive it will wait until a packet. This is fine for my Listenerthread. My thread has a while-loop like this:

while(Listen == true)
{
socket.Receive(...);
}

But if i swap the Listen-Flag to false (if i want to stop listening), it will stuck in the last .Receive().

Then i looked at the Methodes .BeginReceive(). It will call a methode if a packet arrived. But to receive the data i have to use .EndReceive() and that is the point i have a problem with. I want to still listen for packets and dont stop listening if a packet is arriving.

So i still use the blocking version with ".Receive()". I could force the listening thread to cancel by calling: Thread.abort(), but this is not good.

Currently I test if data is available:

while(Listen == true)
{
 if(socket.Available > 0)
 {
  socket.Receive(...);
 }
}

But i think this isnt the best way... If shortly after the if-clause a other thread is calling socket.Receive(..) it will stuck unintentional again. Is there no way to cancel the .Receive(..) methode? I tried to set a timeout, but if .Receive timesout, it will throw an exception...

I want a simple udp-listening-thread, i can stop gracefully. :-) In MSDN i didnt found a listener-example which is listening for more than one packet. How handle other programmer this?

Thank you for reading,

Greetings

user437899

share|improve this question
    
"If shortly after the if-clause a other thread is calling socket.Receive(..) " -- this seems to imply that there are multiple threads reading from the same socket? –  Ragoczy Sep 2 '10 at 13:17
    
No, i dont do that. But it is possible and i want to avoid that :-) –  user437899 Sep 2 '10 at 13:28
1  
When you are ready to stop listening, close the socket. The blocking Receive() method will exit with a SocketException that you'll need to catch. –  Matt Davis Sep 2 '10 at 13:47

2 Answers 2

up vote 9 down vote accepted

Mark the Listen flag as volatile, so changes can be visible between threads.

public volatile bool Listen{get; set;}

Handle the appropriate exceptions in your thread:

Thread listener = new Thread(()=>
{
    while(Listen == true)
    {
        try
        {
            socket.Receive();
        }
        catch(ThreadInterruptException)
        {
            break; // exit the while loop
        }
        catch(SocketException)
        { 
            break; // exit the while loop
        }
    }
});
listener.IsBackground = true;
listener.Start();

In the code where you're switching the Listen flag to false you either close the socket or you interrupt the thread:

Listen = false;

socket.Shutdown(SocketShutdown.Both);
socket.Close();
//
// OR
//
listener.Interrupt();
share|improve this answer

Thank you Lirik and Matt Davis. It works fine, but is it ok to use Exceptions for this? I've learned that exceptions only should be thrown if something bad/unexpected happens. (to stop the blocking methode is intended :-) )

I handled the exception like this. I look for the errorcode and then break the loop.

                try
                {
                    broadcastSocket.ReceiveFrom(returnData, ref ep);

                    //...
                }
                catch (SocketException ex)
                {
                    if (ex.ErrorCode == 10004)
                    {
                        break;
                    }
                }

Why i have to use

socket.Shutdown(SocketShutdown.Both);

before

socket.Close(); 

Will .Close() not shutdown the socket as well?

And if i want to use the socket again, is there a "Restart"-methode oder must i create a new socketinstance?

Greetings user437899

share|improve this answer
    
It's perfectly fine to use an exception to get out of a blocking call, so fear not the Exception! Shutdown stops the sending and receiving, but Close will "shutdown" the socket but in a forceful way. If you want to reuse the socket then call Disconnect instead of Close. –  Lirik Sep 3 '10 at 13:42

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.