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For an array of size N, what is the # of comparisons required?

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1  
How much temporary storage are you allowed? –  Michael Myers Sep 2 '10 at 15:40
1  
Is the array already sorted? –  Gumbo Sep 2 '10 at 15:42
1  
@Sachin, it would be n*log(n) comparisons. Sorting cannot get faster. –  Stargazer712 Sep 2 '10 at 15:47
1  
@Stargazer712: Unless the array is of integers. Then you could radix-sort, with no comparisons at all ;-) –  Steve Jessop Sep 2 '10 at 15:57
2  
@Stargazer712: No bounds needed: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/…. Come to think of it, a radix sort still involves looping over the input data, and a loop has to involve a comparison in the termination condition. It needn't be an order comparison, though, just an equality comparison. But you're right, the question says nothing about the data types, so a proper answer has to assume opaque data and a comparator function. If the interviewer instead makes the mistake of posing an int special case (or string at a real push), it's 0 comparisons... –  Steve Jessop Sep 2 '10 at 16:30

13 Answers 13

up vote 45 down vote accepted

The optimal algorithm uses n+log n-2 comparisons. Think of elements as competitors, and a tournament is going to rank them.

First, compare the elements, as in the tree

   |
  / \
 |   |
/ \ / \
x x x x

this takes n-1 comparisons and each element is involved in comparison at most log n times. You will find the largest element as the winner.

The second largest element must have lost a match to the winner (he can't lose a match to a different element), so he's one of the log n elements the winner has played against. You can find which of them using log n - 1 comparisons.

The optimality is proved via adversary argument. See http://math.stackexchange.com/questions/1601 or http://compgeom.cs.uiuc.edu/~jeffe/teaching/497/02-selection.pdf or http://www.imada.sdu.dk/~jbj/DM19/lb06.pdf or https://www.utdallas.edu/~chandra/documents/6363/lbd.pdf

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Query: this will take N + logN -2 comparisons in addition to the initial N - 1 comparisons needed to find the maximum, right? Because without knowing the maximum, how can we know the logN elements that lost a match against the winner. –  Jatin Aug 18 '12 at 19:53
2  
@Jatin: No, it takes N+log N-2 in total: N-1 comparisons to find the maximum, and log N-1 comparisons to find the largest element among the log N that lost to the maximal element. –  sdcvvc Aug 18 '12 at 20:03
    
how do I find those logN elements? I can't do that by simply traversing the array while trying to find the maximum. –  Jatin Aug 18 '12 at 20:13
    
Jatin: create a binary tree, and start filling it from the bottom. The leaves are elements of the array. Each internal vertex is maximum of its two children. The number of comparisons you need is the number of internal vertices, which is n-1. Then, look at the "opponents" of the maximal element, those are the log N elements. –  sdcvvc Aug 18 '12 at 20:40
    
So this involves some space complexity and that answers everything to me :) –  Sreekar Jul 31 at 18:06

You can find the second largest value with at most 2·(N-1) comparisons and two variables that hold the largest and second largest value:

largest := numbers[0];
secondLargest := null
for i=1 to numbers.length-1 do
    number := numbers[i];
    if number > largest then
        secondLargest := largest;
        largest := number;
    else
        if number > secondLargest then
            secondLargest := number;
        end;
    end;
end;
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2  
That's more than N-1. –  sdcvvc Sep 2 '10 at 15:47
    
N-1 is wrong, check i.e. {1,4,2,3,5} –  x4u Sep 2 '10 at 15:50
    
How do you find 2 largest elements in a set of 3 using 2 comparisons? –  Maciej Hehl Sep 2 '10 at 15:50
2  
Your algorithm doesn't work for {1,3,2}. It would return 1 instead of 2. –  x4u Sep 2 '10 at 15:57
1  
-1. Your algorithm does not work. Try it on the input "3,5,4". –  Stargazer712 Sep 2 '10 at 15:59

Here is some code that might not be optimal but at least actually finds the 2nd largest element:

if( val[ 0 ] > val[ 1 ] )
{
    largest = val[ 0 ]
    secondLargest = val[ 1 ];
}
else
{
    largest = val[ 1 ]
    secondLargest = val[ 0 ];
}

for( i = 2; i < N; ++i )
{
    if( val[ i ] > secondLargest )
    {
        if( val[ i ] > largest )
        {
            secondLargest = largest;
            largest = val[ i ];
        }
        else
        {
            secondLargest = val[ i ];
        }
    }
}

It needs at least N-1 comparisons if the largest 2 elements are at the beginning of the array and at most 2N-3 in the worst case (one of the first 2 elements is the smallest in the array).

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case 1-->9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1
case 2--> 50 10 8 25 ........
case 3--> 50 50 10 8 25.........
case 4--> 50 50 10 8 50 25.......

public void second element()  
{
      int a[10],i,max1,max2;  
      max1=a[0],max2=a[1];  
      for(i=1;i<a.length();i++)  
      {  
         if(a[i]>max1)  
          {
             max2=max1;  
             max1=a[i];  
          }  
         else if(a[i]>max2 &&a[i]!=max1)  
           max2=a[i];  
         else if(max1==max2)  
           max2=a[i];  
      }  
}
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Use Bubble sort or Selection sort algorithm which sorts the array in descending order. Don't sort the array completely. Just two passes. First pass gives the largest element and second pass will give you the second largest element.

No. of comparisons for first pass: n-1 No. of comparisons for first pass: n-2 Total no. of comparison for finding second largest: 2n-3

May be you can generalize this algorithm. If you need the 3rd largest then you make 3 passes.

By above strategy you don't need any temporary variables as Bubble sort and Selection sort are in place sorting algorithms.

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Assuming space is irrelevant, this is the smallest I could get it. It requires 2*n comparisons in worst case, and n comparisons in best case:

arr = [ 0, 12, 13, 4, 5, 32, 8 ]
max = [ -1, -1 ]

for i in range(len(arr)):
     if( arr[i] > max[0] ):
        max.insert(0,arr[i])
     elif( arr[i] > max[1] ):
        max.insert(1,arr[i])

print max[1]
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try this.

max1 = a[0].
max2.
for i = 0, until length:
  if a[i] > max:
     max2 = max1.
     max1 = a[i].
     #end IF
  #end FOR
return min2.

it should work like a charm. low in complexity.

here is a java code.

int secondlLargestValue(int[] secondMax){
int max1 = secondMax[0]; // assign the first element of the array, no matter what, sorted or not.
int max2 = 0; // anything really work, but zero is just fundamental.
   for(int n = 0; n < secondMax.length; n++){ // start at zero, end when larger than length, grow by 1. 
        if(secondMax[n] > max1){ // nth element of the array is larger than max1, if so.
           max2 = max1; // largest in now second largest,
           max1 = secondMax[n]; // and this nth element is now max.
        }//end IF
    }//end FOR
    return max2;
}//end secondLargestValue()
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1  
did it work? it should –  sabbibJAVA Jul 28 '12 at 21:58

Use counting sort and then find the second largest element, starting from index 0 towards the end. There should be at least 1 comparison, at most n-1 (when there's only one element!).

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This doesn't answer the question, which is about the number of comparisons. The question is for analysis of an algorithm, not just the algorithm itself. –  eh9 Nov 9 '12 at 17:38
#include<stdio.h>
main()
{
        int a[5] = {55,11,66,77,72};
        int max,min,i;
        int smax,smin;
        max = min = a[0];
        smax = smin = a[0];
        for(i=0;i<=4;i++)
        {
                if(a[i]>max)
                {
                        smax = max;
                        max = a[i];
                }
                if(max>a[i]&&smax<a[i])
                {
                        smax = a[i];
                }
        }
        printf("the first max element z %d\n",max);
        printf("the second max element z %d\n",smax);
}
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Sorry, JS code...

Tested with the two inputs:

a = [55,11,66,77,72];
a = [ 0, 12, 13, 4, 5, 32, 8 ];

var first = Number.MIN_VALUE;
var second = Number.MIN_VALUE;
for (var i = -1, len = a.length; ++i < len;) {
    var dist = a[i];
    // get the largest 2
    if (dist > first) {
        second = first;
        first = dist;
    } else if (dist > second) { // && dist < first) { // this is actually not needed, I believe
        second = dist;
    }
}

console.log('largest, second largest',first,second);
largest, second largest 32 13

This should have a maximum of a.length*2 comparisons and only goes through the list once.

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I know this is an old question, but here is my attempt at solving it, making use of the Tournament Algorithm. It is similar to the solution used by @sdcvvc , but I am using two-dimensional array to store elements.

To make things work, there are two assumptions:
1) number of elements in the array is the power of 2
2) there are no duplicates in the array

The whole process consists of two steps:
1. building a 2D array by comparing two by two elements. First row in the 2D array is gonna be the entire input array. Next row contains results of the comparisons of the previous row. We continue comparisons on the newly built array and keep building the 2D array until an array of only one element (the largest one) is reached.
2. we have a 2D-array where last row contains only one element: the largest one. We continue going from the bottom to the top, in each array finding the element that was "beaten" by the largest and comparing it to the current "second largest" value. To find the element beaten by the largest, and to avoid O(n) comparisons, we must store the index of the largest element in the previous row. That way we can easily check the adjacent elements. At any level (above root level),the adjacent elements are obtained as:

leftAdjacent = rootIndex*2
rightAdjacent = rootIndex*2+1,

where rootIndex is index of the largest(root) element at the previous level.

I know the question asks for C++, but here is my attempt at solving it in Java. (I've used lists instead of arrays, to avoid messy changing of the array size and/or unnecessary array size calculations)

public static Integer findSecondLargest(List<Integer> list) {
        if (list == null) {
            return null;
        }
        if (list.size() == 1) {
            return list.get(0);
        }
        List<List<Integer>> structure = buildUpStructure(list);
        System.out.println(structure);
        return secondLargest(structure);

    }

    public static List<List<Integer>> buildUpStructure(List<Integer> list) {
        List<List<Integer>> newList = new ArrayList<List<Integer>>();
        List<Integer> tmpList = new ArrayList<Integer>(list);
        newList.add(tmpList);
        int n = list.size();
        while (n>1) {
            tmpList = new ArrayList<Integer>();
            for (int i = 0; i<n; i=i+2) {
                Integer i1 = list.get(i);
                Integer i2 = list.get(i+1);
                tmpList.add(Math.max(i1, i2));
            }
            n/= 2;
            newList.add(tmpList);   
            list = tmpList;
        }
        return newList;
    }

    public static Integer secondLargest(List<List<Integer>> structure) {
        int n = structure.size();
        int rootIndex = 0;
        Integer largest = structure.get(n-1).get(rootIndex);
        List<Integer> tmpList = structure.get(n-2);
        Integer secondLargest = Integer.MIN_VALUE;
        Integer leftAdjacent = -1;
        Integer rightAdjacent = -1;
        for (int i = n-2; i>=0; i--) {
            rootIndex*=2;
            tmpList = structure.get(i);
            leftAdjacent = tmpList.get(rootIndex);
            rightAdjacent = tmpList.get(rootIndex+1); 
            if (leftAdjacent.equals(largest)) {
                if (rightAdjacent > secondLargest) {
                    secondLargest = rightAdjacent;
                }
            }
            if (rightAdjacent.equals(largest)) {
                if (leftAdjacent > secondLargest) {
                    secondLargest = leftAdjacent;
                }
                rootIndex=rootIndex+1;
            }
        }

        return secondLargest;
    }
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The accepted solution by sdcvvc in C++11.

#include <algorithm>
#include <iostream>
#include <vector>
#include <cassert>
#include <climits>

using std::vector;
using std::cout;
using std::endl;
using std::random_shuffle;
using std::min;
using std::max;

vector<int> create_tournament(const vector<int>& input) {
  // make sure we have at least two elements, so the problem is interesting
  if (input.size() <= 1) {
    return input;
  }

  vector<int> result(2 * input.size() - 1, -1);

  int i = 0;
  for (const auto& el : input) {
    result[input.size() - 1 + i] = el;
    ++i;
  }

  for (uint j = input.size() / 2; j > 0; j >>= 1) {
    for (uint k = 0; k < 2 * j; k += 2) {
      result[j - 1 + k / 2] = min(result[2 * j - 1 + k], result[2 * j + k]);
    }
  }

  return result;
}

int second_smaller(const vector<int>& tournament) {
  const auto& minimum = tournament[0];
  int second = INT_MAX;

  for (uint j = 0; j < tournament.size() / 2; ) {
    if (tournament[2 * j + 1] == minimum) {
      second = min(second, tournament[2 * j + 2]);
      j = 2 * j + 1;
    }
    else {
      second = min(second, tournament[2 * j + 1]);
      j = 2 * j + 2;
    }
  }

  return second;
}

void print_vector(const vector<int>& v) {
  for (const auto& el : v) {
    cout << el << " ";
  }
  cout << endl;
}

int main() {

  vector<int> a;
  for (int i = 1; i <= 2048; ++i)
    a.push_back(i);

  for (int i = 0; i < 1000; i++) {
    random_shuffle(a.begin(), a.end());
    const auto& v = create_tournament(a);
    assert (second_smaller(v) == 2);
  }

  return 0;
}
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Sort the array into ascending order then assign a variable to the (n-1)th term.

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1  
Very inefficient. Requires n*log(n) comparisons by definition. –  Stargazer712 Sep 2 '10 at 15:51
    
and also if the array contains duplicate elements this is bound to fail.. –  Baz1nga Aug 10 '12 at 21:22

protected by Community Jul 15 at 22:47

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