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I just discovered that every request in an ASP.Net web application gets a Session lock at the beginning of a request, and then releases it at the end of the request!

In case the implications of this are lost on you, as it was for me at first, this basically means the following:

  • Anytime an ASP.Net webpage is taking a long time to load (maybe due to a slow database call or whatever), and the user decides they want to navigate to a different page because they are tired of waiting, THEY CANT! The ASP.Net session lock forces the new page request to wait until the original request has finished its painfully slow load. Arrrgh.

  • Anytime an UpdatePanel is loading slowly, and the user decides to navigate to a different page before the UpdadePanel has finished updating... THEY CANT! The ASP.Net session lock forces the new page request to wait until the original request has finished its painfully slow load. Double Arrrgh!

So what are the options? So far I have come up with:

  • Implement a Custom SessionStateDataStore, which ASP.Net supports. I haven't found too many out there to copy, and it seems kind of high risk and easy to mess up.
  • Keep track of all requests in progress, and if a request comes in from the same user, cancel the original request. Seems kind of extreme, but it would work (I think).
  • Don't use Session! When I need some kind of state for the user, I could just use Cache instead, and key items on the authenticated user's name, or some such thing. Again seems kind of extreme.

I really can't believe that the ASP.Net Microsoft team would have left such a huge performance bottleneck in the framework at version 4.0! Am I missing something obvious? How hard would it be to use a ThreadSafe collection for the Session?

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You do realize that this site is built atop .NET. That said, I think it scales quite nicely. –  wheaties Sep 2 '10 at 18:30
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OK, so I was being a little facetious with my title. Still, IMHO the performance chocking that the out of the box implementation of session imposes is startling. Also, I bet the Stack Overflow guys have had to do a good bit of highly custom dev to get the performance and scalability they have achieved - and kudos to them. Lastly, Stack Overflow is an MVC APP, not WebForms, which I bet helps (although admittedly this still used the same session infrastructure). –  James Sep 9 '10 at 16:59
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-1: starts from a false premise –  John Saunders Dec 3 '11 at 1:09
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Article on this from an MVC perspective: stefanprodan.eu/2012/02/… –  gregmac Feb 15 '12 at 20:32
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If Joel Mueller gave you the information to fix your issue, why didn't you mark his answer as the correct answer? Just a thought. –  ars265 Oct 26 '12 at 18:24

5 Answers 5

If your page does not modify any session variables, you can opt out of most of this lock.

<% @Page EnableSessionState="ReadOnly" %>

If your page does not read any session variables, you can opt out of this lock entirely, for that page.

<% @Page EnableSessionState="False" %>

If none of your pages use session variables, just turn off session state in the web.config.

<sessionState mode="Off" />

I'm curious, what do you think "a ThreadSafe collection" would do to become thread-safe, if it doesn't use locks?

Edit: I should probably explain by what I mean by "opt out of most of this lock". Any number of read-only-session or no-session pages can be processed for a given session at the same time without blocking each other. However, a read-write-session page can't start processing until all read-only requests have completed, and while it is running it must have exclusive access to that user's session in order to maintain consistency. Locking on individual values wouldn't work, because what if one page changes a set of related values as a group? How would you ensure that other pages running at the same time would get a consistent view of the user's session variables?

I would suggest that you try to minimize the modifying of session variables once they have been set, if possible. This would allow you to make the majority of your pages read-only-session pages, increasing the chance that multiple simultaneous requests from the same user would not block each other.

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Hi Joel Thanks for your time on this answer. These are some good suggestions and some food for thought. I don't understand your reasoning for saying all values for a session must be exclusively locked across the whole request. ASP.Net Cache values can be altered at any time by any thread. Why should this be different for session? As an aside - one problem I have with the readonly option is that if a developer does add a value to the session when it is readonly mode, it silently fails (no exception). In fact it keeps the value for the rest of the request - but not beyond. –  James Sep 2 '10 at 20:33
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@James - I'm just guessing at the motivations of the designers here, but I imagine it's more common to have multiple values depend on each other in a single user's session than in a cache that can be purged for lack of use or low-memory reasons at any time. If one page sets 4 related session variables, and another reads them after only two have been modified, that could easily lead to some very difficult-to-diagnose bugs. I imagine the designers chose to view "the current state of a user's session" as a single unit for locking purposes for that reason. –  Joel Mueller Sep 2 '10 at 20:51
    
In addition, keep in mind that when you're using StateServer or SQL Server session state providers, all session variables for a given user are serialized and shipped off to the server in a single binary blob, at the end of a request. Trying to synchronize individual variables within this blob, as they are changed in realtime, would be pretty terrible for performance. It would mean potentially dozens of calls to the server per request, instead of just one read and one write. –  Joel Mueller Sep 2 '10 at 20:58
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So develop a system that caters to the lowest common denominator programmers that can't figure out locking? Is the purpose to enable web farms that share a session store between IIS instances? Can you give an example of something that you would store in a session variable? I can't think of anything. –  Jason Goemaat Jan 30 '12 at 21:23
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Another useful level of opt-out is <pages enableSessionState="ReadOnly" /> in web.config and use @Page to enable write on specific pages only. –  MattW Oct 16 at 15:34
up vote 39 down vote accepted

OK, so big Props to Joel Muller for all his input. My ultimate solution was to use the Custom SessionStateModule detailed at the end of this MSDN article:

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.web.sessionstate.sessionstateutility.aspx

This was:

  • Very quick to implement (actually seemed easier than going the provider route)
  • Used a lot of the standard ASP.Net session handling out of the box (via the SessionStateUtility class)

This has made a HUGE difference to the feeling of "snapiness" to our application. I still can't believe the custom implementation of ASP.Net Session locks the session for the whole request. This adds such a huge amount of sluggishness to websites. Judging from the amount of online research I had to do (and conversations with several really experienced ASP.Net developers), a lot of people have experienced this issue, but very few people have ever got to the bottom of the cause. Maybe I will write a letter to Scott Gu...

I hope this helps a few people out there!

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That reference is an interesting find, but I must caution you about a few things - the sample code has some problems: First, ReaderWriterLock has been deprecated in favor of ReaderWriterLockSlim - you should use that instead. Second, lock (typeof(...)) has also been deprecated - you should lock instead on a private static object instance. Third, the phrase "This application does not prevent simultaneous Web requests from using the same session identifier" is a warning, not a feature. –  Joel Mueller Sep 7 '10 at 18:04
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I think you can make this work, but you must replace the usage of SessionStateItemCollection in the sample code with a thread-safe class (perhaps based on ConcurrentDictionary) if you want to avoid difficult-to-reproduce errors under load. –  Joel Mueller Sep 7 '10 at 18:19
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Those are all good changes, James, but until you replace SessionStateItemCollection (which is a property of the SessionItem class in the example) with a thread-safe implementation of ISessionStateItemCollection you've still got potential issues. Another thing to consider: do you store any class instances in session variables? Are those classes thread-safe? Because you've just allowed for the possibility of multiple threads accessing instances of those classes at the same time. –  Joel Mueller Sep 7 '10 at 19:20
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I just looked into this a little more, and unfortunately ISessionStateItemCollection requires the Keys property to be of type System.Collections.Specialized.NameObjectCollectionBase.KeysCollection - which has no public constructors. Gee, thanks guys. That's very convenient. –  Joel Mueller Sep 7 '10 at 23:53
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James - obviously this is a fairly old topic, but I was wondering if you were able to share your ultimate solution? I've tried to follow along using the thread of comments above but so far have not been able to get a working solution. I'm fairly certain that there's nothing fundamental in our limited use of the session that would require locking. –  bsiegel Jun 3 '11 at 14:32

I started using the AngiesList.Redis.RedisSessionStateModule, which aside from using the (very fast) Redis server for storage (I'm using the windows port), it does absolutely no locking on the session.

In my opinion, if your application is structured in a reasonable way, this is not a problem. If you actually need locked, consistent data as part of the session, you should specifically implement a lock/concurrency check on your own.

MS deciding that every ASP.NET session should be locked by default just to handle poor application design is a bad decision, in my opinion. Especially because it seems like most developers didn't/don't even realize sessions were locked, let alone that apps apparently need to be structured so you can do read-only session state as much as possible (opt-out, where possible).

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Unless your application has specially needs, I think you have 2 approaches:

  1. Do not use session at all
  2. Use session as is and perform fine tuning as joel mentioned.

Session is not only thread-safe but also state-safe, in a way that you know that until the current request is completed, every session variable wont change from another active request. In order for this to happen you must ensure that session WILL BE LOCKED until the current request have completed.

You can create a session like behavior by many ways, but if it does not lock the current session, it wont be 'session'.

For the specific problems you mentioned I think you should check HttpContext.Current.Response.IsClientConnected. This can be useful to to prevent unnecessary executions and waits on the client, although it cannot solve this problem entirely, as this can be used only by a pooling way and not async.

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I prepared a library based on links posted in this thread. It uses the examples from MSDN and CodeProject. Thanks to James.

I also made modifications advised by Joel Mueller.

Code is here:

https://github.com/dermeister0/LockFreeSessionState

HashTable module:

Install-Package Heavysoft.LockFreeSessionState.HashTable

ScaleOut StateServer module:

Install-Package Heavysoft.LockFreeSessionState.Soss

Custom module:

Install-Package Heavysoft.LockFreeSessionState.Common

If you want to implement support of Memcached or Redis, install this package. Then inherit the LockFreeSessionStateModule class and implement abstract methods.

The code is not tested on production yet. Also need to improve error handling. Exceptions are not caught in current implementation.

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