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// Java programmers, when I mean method, I mean a 'way to do things'...

Hello All,

I'm writing a log miner script to monitor various log files at my company, It's written in Perl though I have access to Python and if I REALLY need to, C (though my company doesn't like binary files). It needs to be able to go through the last 24 hours, take the log code and check it if we should ignore or email the appropriate people (me). The script would run as a cron job on Solaris servers. Now here is what I had in mind (this is only pseudo-ish... and badly written pesudo)

main()
{
    $today = Get_Current_Date();
    $yesterday = Subtract_One_Day($today);
    `grep $yesterday '/path/to/log' > /tmp/log`    # Get logs from previous day
    `awk '{print $X}' > /tmp/log_codes`;           # Get Log Code
    SubRoutine_to_Compare_Log_Codes('/tmp/log_codes');
}

Another thought was to load the log file into memory and read it in there... that is all fine and dandy except for a two small problems.

  1. These servers are production servers and serve a couple million customers...
  2. The Log files average 3.3GB (which are logs for about two days)

So not only would grep take a while to go through each file, but It would use up CPU and Memory in the process which need to be used elsewhere. And loading into memory a 3.3GB file is not of the wisest ideas. (At least IMHO). Now I had a crazy idea involving assembly code and memory locations but I don't know SPARC assembly sooo flush that idea.

Anyone have any suggestions?

Thanks for reading this far =)

share|improve this question
    
Why not read the logs a single line at a time and send each line through an in-memory regexp? –  Steven Sudit Sep 2 '10 at 18:19
    
grep doesn't load entire files into memory at once, and neither should you. –  Matti Virkkunen Sep 2 '10 at 18:19
    
"Why not read the logs a single line at a time and send each line through an in-memory regexp?" - problem is that is going to kill system resources, and the file is updated about 100 times every second so grep will never end. Though I was thinking of getting the last 10k lines or so. "grep doesn't load entire files into memory at once, and neither should you." - did I ever say grep loads the entire file into memory? No, so please don't add words. And the reason for loading a file into memory is it's faster then reading line by line. Small files is fine, large ones like this one... not so much –  w3b_wizzard Sep 2 '10 at 18:24
1  
Maybe you should be a little clearer in your wording. –  Matti Virkkunen Sep 2 '10 at 18:29
    
I really don't want to sound like an ass but I think I was fairly clear. "Another thought was to load the log file into memory and read it in there" and "So not only would grep take a while to go through each file, but It would use up CPU and Memory". I mentioned to load the file in memory, never mentioned grep until the second paragraph. And if you think pipe'ing a few million lines in grep won't suck up memory, then maybe you should test it and look at it yourself. Now instead of discussing about language skills, can we discuss programming? –  w3b_wizzard Sep 3 '10 at 17:19

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Possible solutions: 1) have the system start a new log file every midnight -- this way you could mine the finite-size log file of the previous day at a reduced priority; and 2) modify the logging system so that it automatically extracts certain messages for further processing on the fly.

share|improve this answer
    
This is a step in the right direction. If log files are of unmanageable size, rolling them at specified intervals or sizes is a good idea, and is typically supported natively by the logging framework. Arguably, having a separate log for high-priority entries might also work, although it assumes that priority is known in advance. –  Steven Sudit Sep 2 '10 at 20:02
    
Thank you Steve and Steven. I'll see if I can't do something in that nature, should be fairly simple. Also, we don't really have a separate log for high-priority , this is where I come in with this script, to process what are high-priority logs (with a conf file where people can add the log codes themselves to either monitor or ignore the specific log). Again thanks guys, I'll take a look in that direction and get back to you guys. –  w3b_wizzard Sep 3 '10 at 17:22

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