Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm working on some code that compiles and links (and even has released commercial products) on Windows using MSVC. It doesn't compile with GCC though, I get the following errors:

.../CBaseValue.h: In member function 'bool CBaseValue::InstanceOf()':
.../CBaseValue.h:90:18: error: invalid use of incomplete type 'struct CValueType'
.../CBaseValue.h:11:7: error: forward declaration of 'struct CValueType'

CBaseValue.h

class CValueType;

class CBaseValue {
public:

...

    template <typename _Type>
    bool InstanceOf() {
        CValueType* pType = GetType();
        if(pType == NULL) {
            return false;
        }
        else {
            return pType->IsDerivedFrom<_Type>();
        }
    }

...

}

CValueType.h

class CValueType : public CBaseValue  {
public:

...

    template <typename _Type>
    bool IsDerivedFrom() {
        return IsDerivedFrom(_Type::TYPEDATA);
    }

...

}

I understand why this is a problem. The base class (CBaseValue) has a templated function that uses a derived class (in this case CValueType).

It looks like MSVC isn't exactly obeying the C++ spec here and I've just been bitten by it. But the MSVC behavior of using the forward declaration until code calling the templated function is actually compiled is also more desirable right now. Does anybody know of a work-around where I can get this code working with GCC without having to rewrite a lot of base code?

From my own research it looks like passing '-fno-implicit-templates' to g++ would help but then I'd need to explicitly define the called template types. There are a lot of them so if I can avoid that I'd prefer it. If the general consensus is that this is my best option... so be it!

And in case anybody is wondering, I'm porting the code over to the Mac which is why we're now using GCC.

share|improve this question
    
I suspect the templating is a red herring. Can you take out the templating and confirm this is still an issue? –  Oli Charlesworth Sep 2 '10 at 22:06
1  
Is there any reason you can't move the definition of CBaseValue::InstanceOf into CValueType.h after the definition of class CValueType? –  Charles Bailey Sep 2 '10 at 22:07
    
Unfortunately I can't take out the templating - it's a templated function that the entire type system (within our engine) is based around. For that reason I also can't (without changing lots of code) move the function out of CBaseValue and into CValueType. –  user438380 Sep 2 '10 at 22:14
    
@tony: I don't mean in your production code. I mean create a minimal compilable test case, and then try it. If the result is the same, then you could simplify your question title and code snippet. –  Oli Charlesworth Sep 2 '10 at 22:16
    
@tonythetiger: See my answer for the code I believe Charles meant. It isn't made a member of CValueType, it's still a member of CBaseValue, just using an out-of-line definition (with the inline keyword to keep the inlining optimization semantic). –  Ben Voigt Sep 2 '10 at 22:18

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

This is ill-formed by the Standard, but no diagnostic is required. MSVC is fine not diagnosing this particular case (even when instantiation happens!).

More specifically, the (C++03) Standard rules at 14.6/7

If a type used in a non-dependent name is incomplete at the point at which a template is defined but is complete at the point at which an instantiation is done, and if the completeness of that type affects whether or not the program is well-formed or affects the semantics of the program, the program is ill-formed; no diagnostic is required.

So the solution is to just make the type dependent, but arrange it that during instantiation, that type is designated. For example, you can do that by rewriting your template like this

template<typename T, typename> // just ignore second param!
struct make_dependent { typedef T type; };

template <typename Type> // eww, don't use "_Type" in user code
bool InstanceOf() {
    typename make_dependent<CValueType, Type>::type* pType = GetType();
    // ...
        return pType->template IsDerivedFrom<Type>();
    // ...
}
share|improve this answer
    
good catch on the reserved identifier _Type –  Ben Voigt Sep 2 '10 at 22:15
    
The "_Type" identifier never came from the code itself, it was just something I put here to try and be clear that this was one of our types. I say this because I completely agree with you! –  user438380 Sep 8 '10 at 15:42

It seems that the CBaseValue::InstanceOf() function is useless to anyone not including CValueType.h.

So wait to provide the definition until all needed types are available. (EDIT: This is exactly what is suggested by Charles Bailey's comment that he posted while I was typing -- I guess we think alike.)

CBaseValue.h

class CValueType;

class CBaseValue {
public:

...

    template <typename _Type>
    bool InstanceOf();

...

}

CValueType.h

class CValueType : public CBaseValue  {
public:

...

    template <typename T>
    bool IsDerivedFrom() {
        return IsDerivedFrom(T::TYPEDATA);
    }

...

}


template <typename T>
inline bool CBaseValue::InstanceOf() {
        CValueType* pType = GetType();
        if(pType == NULL) {
            return false;
        }
        else {
            return pType->IsDerivedFrom<T>();
        }
    }

They seem very tightly coupled though, so maybe having just one header file for both classes, or one public header file that includes the individual headers in the correct order, would be better.

share|improve this answer
    
You're absolutely correct that those types are very tightly coupled - and this was a good idea. Thank you! –  user438380 Sep 8 '10 at 15:44

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.