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Java programmers and API seems to favor explicit set/get methods.

however I got the impression C++ community frowns upon such practice. If it is so,is there a particular reason (besides more lines of code) why this is so?

on the other hand, why does Java community choose to use methods rather than direct access?

Thank you

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13 Answers

up vote 12 down vote accepted

A well designed class should ideally not have too many gets and sets. In my opinion, too many gets and sets are basically an indication of the fact that someone else (and potentially many of them) need my data to achieve their purpose. In that case, why does that data belong to me in the first place? This violates the basic principle of encapsulation (data + operations in one logical unit).

So, while there is no technical restriction and (in fact abundance of) 'set' and 'get' methods, I would say that you should pause and reinspect your design if you want too many of those 'get' and 'set' in your class interface used by too many other entities in your system.

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3  
Operations is the key word. A Get/Set pair suggests you are no longer performing operations on your data. It simply is. –  Dennis Zickefoose Sep 3 '10 at 2:45
4  
This is true both for C++ and Java (and any other programming language). Don't just blindly add getters and setters for every field of your class. Only add them if there's a reason for them to exist. –  Jesper Sep 3 '10 at 7:19
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There are occasions when getters/setters are appropriate but an abundance of getters/setters typically indicate that your design fails to achieve any higher level of abstraction.

Typically it's better (in regards to encapsulation) to exhibit higher level operations for your objects that does not make the implementation obvious to the user.

Some other possible reasons why it's not as common in C++ as in Java:

  • The Standard Library does not use it.
  • Bjarne Stroustrup expresses his dislike towards it (last paragraph):

    I particularly dislike classes with a lot of get and set functions. That is often an indication that it shouldn't have been a class in the first place. It's just a data structure. And if it really is a data structure, make it a data structure.

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That's a great way to think about get-setters. Too many really should make me think about the design of the class - do I really mean a structure? I'll relook at some of my code where I was wondering whether to use get/set instead of public members that I just update 'in situ' as it were. Although isn't one benefit of using get/set that you get to do some range checking and validation before modifying your class, thus letting you degrade gracefully when the class is improperly used? –  Pete855217 Nov 26 '12 at 8:16
    
As I said there are occasions when getters/setters are appropriate but it's always good to take a step back and consider your design. What does your class provide in terms of abstractions? Bounds-checking could be one of those appropriate cases even if bound-checking could also be done by the type itself. E.g. instead of using an int as the type for a row or column. Create a type Row that "knows" how many rows are available and a type Column that "knows" how many columns are available. Then you do the bounds-checking in your overloaded operator=. –  Andreas Magnusson Apr 26 '13 at 9:25
    
As a bonus it's also not possible to do r = c where r is a Row and c is a Column. –  Andreas Magnusson Apr 26 '13 at 9:26
    
I don't understand Stroustrup's comment exactly. Objects do act as data structures, and allowing users direct access to member variables means that you can't control things validation (at the time of setting a variable), or maybe just other dependent state (like incrementing a total when some value is updated). I can't believe that doing those types of things is automatically a case of bad design. Yet you need setters/getters to do that. –  Sam Goldberg Jun 18 '13 at 19:13
    
@SamGoldberg: I guess the point he's trying to make is that if you have a class with a lot of getters&setters, you're providing a pretty thin layer of abstraction over a struct. A lot of people in the get/set-club use validation as an excuse but I rarely see it used in practice (validation in set). The reason is that either a class has a proper invariant to protect where get/set doesn't really make sense (e.g. a stack) or it's just a collection of data without a proper invariant to protect (e.g. a person-class). –  Andreas Magnusson Aug 14 '13 at 14:36
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The usual argument against get/set methods is that if you have both and they're just trivial return x; and x = y; then you haven't actually encapsulated anything at all; you may as well just make the member public which saves a whole lot of boilerplate code.

Obviously there are cases where they still make sense; if you need to do something special in them, or you need to use inheritance or, particularly, interfaces.

There is the advantage that if you implement getters/setters you can change their implementation later without having to alter code that uses them. I suppose the frowning on it you refer to is kind of a YAGNI thing that if there's no expectation of ever altering the functions that way, then there's little benefit to having them. In many cases you can just deal with the case of altering the implementation later anyway.

I wasn't aware that the C++ community frowned on them any more or less than the Java community; my impression is that they're rather less common in languages like Python, for example.

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for example, this is one comment I found in another thread: Personally I hate geters/setters (Its Java like and not C++ like). –  Anycorn Sep 3 '10 at 2:05
    
Making a data member public exposes you to debugging nightmares - if you have, say, a reference count type of data member, finding all the increment and decrement operations is a nightmare if you don't have a setter/getter to stick a breakpoint on. As Inc/Dec are trivial operations, they could be inlined by the compiler in the release version. –  JBRWilkinson Sep 3 '10 at 8:06
    
@JBRWilkinson this problem is solved by properties, which keep the client syntax clean and can be emulated in C++. –  ulidtko Mar 19 '12 at 3:33
    
@JBRWilkinson: Ever heard of data breakpoints? Besides if you expose your reference count I would say you only have yourself to blame...;) –  Andreas Magnusson Aug 14 '13 at 14:41
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I think the reason the C++ community frowns on getters and setters is that C++ offers far better alternatives. For example:

template <class T>
class DefaultPredicate
{
public:
  static bool CheckSetter (T value)
  {
    return true;
  }
  static void CheckGetter (T value)
  {
  }
};

template <class T, class Predicate = DefaultPredicate <T>>
class Property
{
public:
  operator T ()
  {
    Predicate::CheckGetter (m_storage);
    return m_storage;
  }
  Property <T, Predicate> &operator = (T rhs)
  {
    if (Predicate::CheckSetter (rhs))
    {
      m_storage = rhs;
    }
    return *this;
  }
private:
  T m_storage;
};

which can then be used like this:

class Test
{
public:
  Property <int> TestData;
  Property <int> MoreTestData;
};

int main ()
{
  Test
    test;

  test.TestData = 42;
  test.MoreTestData = 24;
  int value = test.TestData;
  bool check = test.TestData == test.MoreTestData;
}

Notice that I added a predicate parameter to the property class. With this, we can get creative, for example, a property to hold an integer colour channel value:

class NoErrorHandler
{
public:
  static void SignalError (const char *const error)
  {
  }
};

class LogError
{
public:
  static void SignalError (const char *const error)
  {
    std::cout << error << std::endl;
  }
};

class Exception
{
public:
  Exception (const char *const message) :
    m_message (message)
  {
  }

  operator const char *const ()
  {
    return m_message;
  }

private:
  const char
    *const m_message;
};

class ThrowError
{
public:
  static void SignalError (const char *const error)
  {
    throw new Exception (error);
  }
};

template <class ErrorHandler = NoErrorHandler>
class RGBValuePredicate : public DefaultPredicate <int>
{
public:
  static bool CheckSetter (int rhs)
  {
    bool
      setter_ok = true;

    if (rhs < 0 || rhs > 255)
    {
      ErrorHandler::SignalError ("RGB value out of range.");
      setter_ok = false;
    }

    return setter_ok;
  }
};

and it can be used like this:

class Test
{
public:
  Property <int, RGBValuePredicate <> > RGBValue1;
  Property <int, RGBValuePredicate <LogError> > RGBValue2;
  Property <int, RGBValuePredicate <ThrowError> > RGBValue3;
};

int main ()
{
  Test
    test;

  try
  {
    test.RGBValue1 = 4;
    test.RGBValue2 = 5;
    test.RGBValue3 = 6;
    test.RGBValue1 = 400;
    test.RGBValue2 = 500;
    test.RGBValue3 = -6;
  }
  catch (Exception *error)
  {
    std::cout << "Exception: " << *error << std::endl;
  }
}

Notice that I made the handling of bad values a template parameter as well.

Using this as a starting point, it can be extended in many different ways.

For example, allow the storage of the property to be different to the public type of the value - so the RGBValue above could use an unsigned char for storage but an int interface.

Another example is to change the predicate so that it can alter the setter value. In the RGBValue above this could be used to clamp values to the range 0 to 255 rather than generate an error.

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Oh man, I love this answer, it's awesome. No stinky getters&setters in my code! –  ulidtko Mar 19 '12 at 3:37
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There's nothing unusual about having explicit set/get methods in C++. I've seen it in plenty of C++, it can be very useful to not allow direct access to data members.

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Except that they have ugly syntax and can be replaced by properties. –  ulidtko Mar 19 '12 at 3:36
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Properties as a general language concept technically predate C++, e.g. in Smalltalk, but they weren't ever part of the standard. Getters and setters were a concept used in C++ when it was used for development of UI's, but truth be told, it's an expensive proposition to develop UI's in what is effectively a systems language. The general problem with getters and setters in C++ was that, since they weren't a standard, everybody had a different standard.

And in systems languages, where efficiency concerns are high, then it's just easier to make the variable itself public, although there's a lot of literature that frowns mightily on that practice. Often, you simply see richer exchanges of information between C++ object instances than simple items.

You'll probably get a lot of viewpoints in response to this question, but in general, C++ was meant to be C that did objects, making OOP accessable to developers that didn't know objects. It was hard enough to get virtuals and templates into the language, and I think that it's been kind of stagnant for a while.

Java differs because in the beginning, with what Java brought in areas like garbage collection, it was easier to promote the philosophy of robust encapsulation, i.e. external entities should keep their grubby little paws off of internal elements of a class.

I admit this is pretty much opinion - at this time I use C++ for highly optimized stuff like 3D graphics pipelines - I already have to manage all my object memory, so I'd take a dim view of fundamentally useless code that just serves to wrap storage access up in additional functions - that said, the basic performance capabilies of runtimes like the MSFT .net ILM make that a position that can be difficult to defend at times

Purely my 2c

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I don't think the C++ community frowned on using getters and setters. They are almost always a good idea.

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why was this given a -1? the answer makes sense to me. –  Carl Sep 3 '10 at 2:10
1  
My guess it was down voted because it's not almost always a good idea. See my response to this question. –  Andreas Magnusson Sep 3 '10 at 8:08
    
Wasn't me, but see the Bjarne Stroustrup comment on @Andreas Magnusson's answer. –  JBRWilkinson Sep 3 '10 at 8:11
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Check out this question for an explanation of why Java tends to prefer them and the reasons for C++ are the same. In short: it allows you to change the way data members are accessed without forcing client code (code that uses your code) to recompile. It also allows you to enforce a specific policy for how to access data and what to do when that data is accessed.

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By mandating the use of set/get methods, one can implement useful side-effects in the getter/setter (for example, when the argument to get/set is an object).

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I am surprised nobody has mentioned Java introspection and beans yet.

Using get.../set... naming convention combined with introspection allows all sorts of clever trickery with utility classes.

I personally feel that the "public" keyword should have been enough to trigger the bean magic but I am not Ray Gosling.

My take on this is that in C++ is a rather pointless exercise. You are adding at least six lines of code to test and maintain which perform no purpose and will for the most part be ignored by the compiler. It doesnt really protect your class from misuse and abuse unless you add a lot more coding.

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It has to do with the basics of object oriented programming - hiding the internals of an object from its users. The users of an object should not need to know (nor should they care) about the internals of an object.

It also gives you control over what is done whenever a user of your object tries to read/write to it. In effect, you expose an interface to the object's users. They have to use that interface and you control what happens when methods in that interface are called - the getters and setters would be part of the interface.

It just makes things easier when debugging. A typical scenario is when your object lands up in a weird state and you're debugging to find out how it got there. All you do is set breakpoints in your getters and setters and assuming all else is fine, you're able to see how your object gets to the weird state. If your object's users are all directly accessing its members, figuring out when your object's state changes becomes a lot harder (though not impossible)

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I would argue that C++ needs getters/setters more than Java.

In Java, if you start with naked field access, and later you changed your mind, you want getter/setter instead, it is extremely easy to find all the usages of the field, and refactor them into getter/setter.

in C++, this is not that easy. The language is too complex, IDEs simply can't reliably do that.

so In C++, you better get it right the first time. In Java, you can be more adventurous.

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My opinion is just the opposite: in C++ you can simulate a property, adding nontrivial logic into the field access operations without breaking any client code, while in Java you cannot. Needless to say (I'd wish it was) that sometimes one cannot "find all the usages and refactor them into getter/setter", just because he doesn't own the client code. –  ulidtko Mar 19 '12 at 5:39
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There were gets/sets long before java. There are many reasons to use them, especially, if you have to recalculate sth. wenn a value changes. So the first big advantage is, that you can watch to value changes. But imho its bad to ALWAYS implement get and set-often a get is enough. Another point is, that class changes will directly affect your customers. You cant change member names without forcing to refactor the clients code with public members. Lets say, you have an object with a lenght and you change this member name...uh. With a getter, you just change you side of the code and the client can sleep well. Adding gets/Sets for members that should be hidden is of course nonsense.

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