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Is there any difference between them? Is using them a matter of preference? Does using one over the other produce any advantages? Which is better for security?

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possible duplicate of When should I use require_once vs include? –  Gordon Sep 3 '10 at 7:56
3  
Always use "require". "include" is as convenient as an electric door in a sauna. –  Marco Mariani Sep 3 '10 at 9:50
    
@MarcoMariani How would that be inconvenient? It's probably clear, I'm just not seeing it. Perhaps the steam? –  Austin Burk Jun 12 at 19:44
    
To put it simply, if a 'foo.php' file is missing by mistake, I want to know as soon as possible, not when a function that should have been in foo.php is called. Replacing include with require can often reveal bugs. Let's say config.php is missing, and the application is running with a default configuration. Which is better for security? As for the sauna, when I'm inside and the door does not open for some reason I don't like it. –  Marco Mariani Jun 13 at 7:55

6 Answers 6

up vote 61 down vote accepted

Update
As my first "search the web answer" was misleading, I turn to W3Schools for a more clear answer :)

Include and require are identical, except upon failure:

 require will produce a fatal error (E_COMPILE_ERROR) and stop the script 
 include will only produce a warning (E_WARNING) and the script will continue

See @efritz's answer for an example

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4  
tiposaurus.co.uk/2011/04/04/… "The key difference between require() and include() is that if you require() a file that can't be loaded (eg if it isn't there) then it generates a fatal error which will halt the execution of the page completely, and no more output will be generated. On the other hand, if you include() a file that can't be loaded, then this will merely generate a warning and continue building the page." –  stormwild Sep 26 '12 at 1:59
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"What one you should use depends on the situation; require() is best suited for loading files that are essential to the rest of the page - for example if you have a database driven website then using require() to include a file containing the database login and password is clearly preferred over using include(). If you used include() in this situation, then you may end up generating more warnings and errors than you had intended." –  stormwild Sep 26 '12 at 2:01
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<?php if (isset($flibbertygibbet)) require 'file.php'; would seem to make this answer look totally incorrect. Otherwise, i should get a fatal error even though the condition isn't true. strace doesn't show PHP even trying to touch file.php. –  cHao Feb 13 '13 at 17:06
    
Unlike include(), require() will always read in the target file, even if the line it's on never executes. If you want to conditionally include a file, use include(). AND However, if the line on which the require() occurs is not executed, neither will any of the code in the target file be executed. Seem to be saying the opposite thing, or am i misunderstanding? –  dlampard Aug 15 '13 at 16:35
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This is so wrong, you should delete this post as you are misleading people. –  mike Sep 12 '13 at 21:02

require will throw a PHP Fatal Error if the file cannot be loaded. (Execution stops)

include produces a Warning if the file cannot be loaded. (Execution continues)

Here is a nice illustration of include and require difference

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Use include if you don't mind your script continuing without loading the file (in case it doesn't exist etc) and you can (although you shouldn't) live with a Warning error message being displayed.

Using require means your script will halt if it can't load the specified file, and throw a Fatal error.

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As others pointed out, the only difference is that require throws a fatal error, and include - a catchable warning. As for which one to use, my advice is to stick to include. Why? because you can catch a warning and produce a meaningful feedback to end users. Consider

  // Example 1.
  // users see a standard php error message or a blank screen
  // depending on your display_errors setting
  require 'not_there'; 


  // Example 2.
  // users see a meaningful error message
  try {
      include 'not_there';
  } catch(Exception $e) {
     echo "something strange happened!";
  }

NB: for example 2 to work you need to install an errors-to-exceptions handler, as described here http://www.php.net/manual/en/class.errorexception.php

  function exception_error_handler($errno, $errstr, $errfile, $errline ) {
     throw new ErrorException($errstr, 0, $errno, $errfile, $errline);
  }
  set_error_handler("exception_error_handler");   
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The key difference between require() and include() is that if you require() a file that can't be loaded (eg if it isn't there) then it generates a fatal error which will halt the execution of the page completely, and no more output will be generated. On the other hand, if you include() a file that can't be loaded, then this will merely generate a warning and continue building the page.

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In case of Include Program will not terminate and display warning on browser,On the other hand Require program will terminate and display fatal error in case of file not found.

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Did you really have to bump a 2 1/2 year old question to repeat what 2/3 of the answers have already said...? –  cHao Feb 13 '13 at 19:06
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Aww, he's a newbie! Probably doesn't understand the concept of SO yet. –  Dan Hanly Feb 14 '13 at 11:26
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I says in simple words...!!! –  user2069222 Feb 25 '13 at 12:05

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