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I have seen a lot of links introduced the variadic templates. But I have never seen one compilable example that demonstrates this approach?

Could someone provides me some links in which such compilable examples can be found?

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1  
What do you mean by "compilable example"? I think all those links introduced examples which can be compiled. –  KennyTM Sep 3 '10 at 9:17
    
no, that is not the case. This examples describe only the deceleration of such veriadic temlates may be the definition too, but never the call, in case of variadic function, or instantiate some variadic classes in the main function. I need actually just simple example which I can copy and compile it to better understand the variadic mechanism.. –  sami Sep 3 '10 at 9:23
1  
Are you sure you're using a compiler that supports it and invoke it with the correct options? –  sellibitze Sep 3 '10 at 12:36
    
Actually, I just meant that I need some examples to compile it. I do know that the compile flag -std=c++0x should be set. However all example I found are printf like. I need a small but meaningful example.. –  sami Sep 3 '10 at 14:17

6 Answers 6

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Variadic templates are part of the C++0x standard which is not yet officially released. They are supported by gcc since version 4.3, but you need to enable support for C++0x by adding the compiler switch -std=c++0x.

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Right. And as far as I know, the Microsoft Compiler doesn't yet support variadic templates. Just saying. –  sellibitze Sep 3 '10 at 12:35
2  
no Microsoft Compiler doesn't support it and they need to. –  BabelFish Jan 28 '11 at 17:38
    
They announced some features that will be in MSVC11 (in 2012), and Variadic Templates was not on that list. Time for me to learn to install MinGW. –  Mooing Duck Nov 23 '11 at 22:11
    
@sami I totally don't understand why this is the accepted answer... –  Virus721 Nov 27 '13 at 14:05
    
@Virus721 he was complaining that there is no compilable example. There are tons of examples - the only reason they don't compile are: missing compiler support or missing compiler switch –  David Feurle Nov 28 '13 at 7:19

One of the simplest possible examples is the following implementation of max which isn't even templated on types.

int maximum(int n)
{
    return n;
}

template<typename... Args>
int maximum(int n, Args... args)
{
    return max(n, maximum(args...));
}

Only slightly more complex is the canonical printf implementation:

void printf(const char *s)
{
  while (*s)
  {
    if (*s == '%' && *(++s) != '%')
      throw "invalid format string: missing arguments";
    std::cout << *s++;
  }
}

template<typename T, typename... Args>
void printf(const char* s, T value, Args... args)
{
  while (*s)
  {
    if (*s == '%' && *(++s) != '%')
    {
      std::cout << value;
      printf(s, args...); // call even when *s == 0 to detect extra arguments
      return;
    }
    std::cout << *s++;
  }
  throw "extra arguments provided to printf";
}
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1  
Are the ... after Args and args just syntactic salt, or are there also ways in which variadic parameters can be used without the ...? –  Stewart Oct 18 '11 at 16:20
    
The placement of ... matters. Consider two variadic template functions sum and product. Now call them from within another variadic template with parameters 2,3,4 the value of product(sum(args...)) will be 9 and the value of product(sum(args)...) will be 24. –  Motti Oct 26 '11 at 20:51
    
@Stewart I expanded on this theme slightly in a blog post –  Motti Nov 7 '11 at 15:37

Variadic templates are a C++0x feature that primarily targets authors of generic libraries. I would not expect to see them in "user code". For example, in the C++0x standard library they are used in a lot of places: std::function, std::async, std::reference_wrapper, std::tuple, std::packaged_task, ...

To give you an example I'll show you how a reference_wrapper might be implemented with respect to variadic templates:

template<class T>
class reference_wrapper
{
    T *ptr;
public:
    explicit reference_wrapper(T& thing) : ptr(&thing) {}
    explicit reference_wrapper(T&&     ) = delete;

    operator T&() const {return *ptr;}

    template<class... Args>
    decltype( declval<T&>()(declval<Args>()...) )
    operator()(Args&&... args) const
    {
        return (*ptr)(forward<Args>(args)...);
    }
};

This is not perfectly conforming to the standard draft but it is supposed to be compilable with little modification. It demonstrates multiple C++0x features:

  • deleted functions (disabling the constructor for rvalues)
  • rvalue references (detecting rvalue arguments to the constructor, perfect forwarding)
  • type deduction via decltype
  • standard library function template declval to create objects for the purpose of building an expression for decltype (GCC does not yet offer this function template. You have to write it yourself)
  • variadic templates (accepting an arbitrary number of parameters)

The purpose of the variadic member template is to forward arguments to the object referred to by ptr. This should work in case T is a function pointer type or a class type with overloaded function call operator.

cheers! s

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1  
yes, I looked at it. I tried to create an example to to compile it without success. I need an compilable example which, as I said, demonstrates this approach by running it –  sami Sep 3 '10 at 9:28

This is an example of variadic templates that I put up on my blog: http://thenewcpp.wordpress.com/2011/11/23/variadic-templates-part-1-2/

It compiles. It demonstrates finding the largest type from a group of types.

#include <type_traits>

template <typename... Args>
struct find_biggest;

//the biggest of one thing is that one thing
template <typename First>
struct find_biggest<First>
{
  typedef First type;
};

//the biggest of everything in Args and First
template <typename First, typename... Args>
struct find_biggest<First, Args...>
{
  typedef typename find_biggest<Args...>::type next;
  typedef typename std::conditional
  <
    sizeof(First) >= sizeof(next),
    First,
    next
  >::type type;
};
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Mmmmm i've always thought that C++ was made for a more human readable syntax than C... –  Virus721 Nov 27 '13 at 14:10
    
Maybe in some cases. But you can't even do this in C, so it's not really comparable. –  Jarryd Nov 27 '13 at 23:56

http://norcalli.blogspot.com/2011/05/c0x-and-variadic-templates.html

Example from my blog:

// Copyright 2011 Ashkan Kiani
#include <iostream>
#include <iomanip>
#include <string.h>

template<class T>
inline bitcopy(void *p, T* t) {
  memcpy(p, t, sizeof(*t));
}

void test(const char* s) {
  while (*s) {
    if (*s == '%' && *(++s) != '%') {
      throw std::runtime_error("Not enough parameters!");
    }
    std::cout << *s++;
  }
}

template<class T>
void test(const char* s, T t) {
  while (*s) {
    if (*s == '%' && *(++s) != '%') {
      if (*s == '*') {
        throw std::runtime_error("Not enough parameters!");
      } else {
        std::cout << t;
        test(++s);
      }
      return;
    }
    std::cout << *s++;
  }
  throw std::logic_error("Too many arguments!");
}

template<class T, class U, class... Args>
void test(const char* s, T t, U u, Args... args) {
  while (*s) {
    if (*s == '%' && *(++s) != '%') {
      if (*s == '*') {
        int width = 0;
//      width = t;                // Uncommenting this would cause a failure if the parameters aren't all int's.
        bitcopy(&width, &t);
        std::cout << std::setw(width) << u;
        test(s+2, args...);
      } else {
        std::cout << t;
        test(++s, u, args...);
      }
      return;
    }
    std::cout << *s++;
  }
  throw std::logic_error("Too many arguments!");
}

int main(int argc, char** argv) {
  test("Hello my name is %*s and I am %s.\n", 15, "Ashkan", 10);
  return 0;
}
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