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Imagine that a - b < c (a, b, c are C# doubles). Is it guaranteed that a < b + c?

Thanks!

EDIT
Let's say that the arithmetical overflow doesn't occur unlike the following example:

double a = 1L << 53;
double b = 1;
double c = a;

Console.WriteLine(a - b < c); // Prints True
Console.WriteLine(a < b + c); // Prints False

Imagine that Math.Abs(a) < 1.0 && Math.Abs(b) < 1.0 && Math.Abs(c) < 1.0

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How is this related to C# or any specific data type (or even programming)? Looks like pure math to me. –  Fredrik Mörk Sep 3 '10 at 9:20
2  
@Fredrik Mörk: No, it's all about precision. –  jgauffin Sep 3 '10 at 9:21
1  
@Fredrik Mörk: Because it has to do with the languages level of precision on non-integer arithmetic –  BeRecursive Sep 3 '10 at 9:21
    
@jgauffin and @BeRecursive: of course! :) –  Fredrik Mörk Sep 3 '10 at 9:23
    
Actually the math is quite trivial and it has something to do with the datatype. Imagine things like 3.0 * (1.0/3.0) == 1.0 etc. Mathematically correct, in C# might not hold exactly depending on the datatype. –  Tomas Vana Sep 3 '10 at 9:23

3 Answers 3

up vote 13 down vote accepted

No. Suppose a = c, a very large number, and b is a very small number. It's possible that a - b has a representation less than a, but a + b is so close to a (and bigger) that it still ends up being most precisely representable as a.

Here's an example:

double a = 1L << 53;
double b = 1;
double c = a;

Console.WriteLine(a - b < c); // Prints True
Console.WriteLine(a < b + c); // Prints False

EDIT:

Here's another example, which matches your edited question:

double a = 1.0;
double b = 1.0 / (1L << 53);
double c = a;

Console.WriteLine(a - b < c); // Prints True
Console.WriteLine(a < b + c); // Prints False

In other words, when we subtract a very small number from 1, we get a result less than 1. When we add the same number to 1, we just get 1 back due to the limitations of double precision.

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+1, proof by a counter example. Love it. –  Darin Dimitrov Sep 3 '10 at 9:26
    
or the other way around, I also have the feeling it's like that. –  Tomas Vana Sep 3 '10 at 9:27
2  
It gets even weirder when a=c=double.MaxValue. Then both are false. –  Vilx- Sep 3 '10 at 9:28
    
Great example, sure. But actually we deal with micro-numbers, not with values around double.MaxValue. Please read EDIT for more information. –  levanovd Sep 3 '10 at 9:39
    
@levanovd: 1 << 53 is way smaller than double.MaxValue. There's no overflow going on here. –  Jon Skeet Sep 3 '10 at 9:43

no not always:

        double a = double.MaxValue;
        double b = double.MaxValue;
        double c = 0.1;
        Console.WriteLine(a - b < c); // True
        Console.WriteLine(a < b + c); // False
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This link speaks about floating-point arithmetic properties, and could be very interesting:

FLOATING-POINT FALLACIES

In particular, search for Properties of Relations

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