Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm trying to engage in some C-preprocessor-only templating efforts in order to type-specialize some code. I've tried to boil it down a bit, so this example seems trivial and pointless, but the real challenge is getting the "include" blocking.

Say I have a "template" file, that gets #included from other source files that define T_ELEMENT_TYPE before including the template.

// Template file...
#ifndef T_ELEMENT_TYPE
#error #define T_ELEMENT_TYPE
#endif

#define PASTER(x,y) x ## y
#define EVALUATOR(x,y) PASTER(x,y)
#define SYMBOLNAME EVALUATOR(SymbolFor, T_ELEMENT_TYPE)

#ifndef SYMBOLNAMEISDEFINED
#define SYMBOLNAMEISDEFINED EVALUTOR(DEFINEDFOR, T_ELEMENT_TYPE)

int SYMBOLNAME(T_ELEMENT_TYPE arg)
{
    // do something with arg
    return 0;
}

#endif // Guard #ifdef

Then I want to include that template from multiple instantiation sites, but I only want the templated function to be generated ONCE per unique T_ELEMENT_TYPE (so as not to create duplicate symbols.) Like, say this:

// Template-using file...    
#define T_ELEMENT_TYPE int
#include "Template.c"
#undef T_ELEMENT_TYPE

#define T_ELEMENT_TYPE float
#include "Template.c"
#undef T_ELEMENT_TYPE

#define T_ELEMENT_TYPE int
#include "Template.c"
#undef T_ELEMENT_TYPE

int someOtherFunc()
{
    int foo = 42;
    foo = SymbolForint(foo);
    float bar = 42.0;
    bar = SymbolForfloat(bar);
    return foo;
}

So I'm looking for something I can use in the template code. I imagined it might look something like this (although this does not work):

// Template file...
#ifndef T_ELEMENT_TYPE
#error #define T_ELEMENT_TYPE
#endif

#define PASTER(x,y) x ## y
#define EVALUATOR(x,y) PASTER(x,y)
#define SYMBOLNAME EVALUATOR(SymbolFor, T_ELEMENT_TYPE)

#ifndef SYMBOLNAMEISDEFINED
#define SYMBOLNAMEISDEFINED EVALUTOR(DEFINEDFOR, T_ELEMENT_TYPE)

int SYMBOLNAME(T_ELEMENT_TYPE arg)
{
    // do something with arg
    return 0;
}

#endif // Guard #ifdef

This particular incantation blocks ALL multiple instantiations of the template, not just for different values of T_ELEMENT_TYPE.

Is there a trick I can use to get this effect? Or am I just off the C-Preprocessor reservation, so to speak?

Thanks! Jour

share|improve this question
add comment

1 Answer 1

I think you're off the reservation. The first "argument" to #define, the macro name, isn't subject to macro-expansion. So I don't think the preprocessor can define a different symbol according to the value of T_ELEMENT_TYPE. Neither can the preprocessor construct a "list" of already-seen types and check for existence in that.

So I think the include-guard will have to be outside the file:

#ifndef included_mytemplatefile_h_int
    #undef T_ELEMENT_TYPE
    #define T_ELEMENT_TYPE int
    #include "mytemplatefile.h"
    #define included_mytemplatefile_h_int
#endif

Alternatively, if your template file header only declares the function SymbolFor_int, instead of defining it, then multiple inclusion isn't harmful. You could have a normal include guard around the parts of the file that don't depend on the current value of T_ELEMENT_TYPE, including the definitions of PASTER, EVALUATOR, SYMBOLNAME. You'd need a separate template file containing definitions, which the program (rather than each translation unit) needs to have exactly once:

template_%.c :
    echo "#define T_ELEMENT_TYPE $*" > $@
    echo "#include \"mytemplatedefinitions.c\"" >> $@

Then add template_int.o to the list of files linked into your program.

share|improve this answer
    
Most definitely off the reservation. The rules for #ifdef/#ifndef/defined are carefully worded such that there is no possibility of performing a macro-expansion on the identifier being tested, and that is what you need for the idea from the OP to work. –  Bart van Ingen Schenau Sep 8 '10 at 9:02
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.