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I load the following YAML stream into a Perl's array and I want to traverse the array associated with Field2.

use YAML;

my @arr = Load(<<'...');
---
Field1: F1
Field2:
 - {Key: v1, Val: v2}
 - {Key: v3, Val: v4}
---
Field1: F2
Field2:
 - {Key: v5, Val: v6}
 - {Key: v7, Val: v8}
...

foreach (@arr) {
    @tmp = $_->{'Field2'};   
    print $#tmp; # why it says 0 when I have 2 elements?

    # Also why does the below loop not work? 
    foreach ($_->{'Field2'}) {
    print $_->{'Key'} . " -> " $_->{'Val'} . "\n";
 }
}

I appreciate any feedback. Thank you.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Because you are not using references correctly. You may want to reread perldoc perlreftut and perldoc perlref.

#!/usr/bin/perl

use strict;
use warnings;

use YAML;

my @arr = Load(<<'...');
---
Field1: F1
Field2:
 - {Key: v1, Val: v2}
 - {Key: v3, Val: v4}
---
Field1: F2
Field2:
 - {Key: v5, Val: v6}
 - {Key: v7, Val: v8}
...

for my $record (@arr) {
     print "$record->{Field1}:\n";
     for my $subrecord (@{$record->{Field2}}) {
         print "\t$subrecord->{Key} = $subrecord->{Val}\n";
     }
}
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You did not address the part where Martin inquires about the count of hashref values for the Field2 keys. –  daxim Sep 3 '10 at 16:13
1  
@daxim The links address that and other concerns related to references. –  Chas. Owens Sep 3 '10 at 16:59

You need to do some exercises with data structures and references. This works:

use 5.010;
use strict;
use warnings FATAL => 'all';

use YAML qw(Load);

my @structs = Load(<<'...');
---
Field1: F1
Field2:
 - {Key: v1, Val: v2}
 - {Key: v3, Val: v4}
---
Field1: F2
Field2:
 - {Key: v5, Val: v6}
 - {Key: v7, Val: v8}
...

# (
#     {
#         Field1 => 'F1',
#         Field2 => [
#             {
#                 Key => 'v1',
#                 Val => 'v2'
#             },
#             {
#                 Key => 'v3',
#                 Val => 'v4'
#             }
#         ]
#     },
#     {
#         Field1 => 'F2',
#         Field2 => [
#             {
#                 Key => 'v5',
#                 Val => 'v6'
#             },
#             {
#                 Key => 'v7',
#                 Val => 'v8'
#             }
#         ]
#     }
# )

foreach (@structs) {
    my $f2_aref = $_->{'Field2'};
    print scalar @{ $f2_aref }; # 2

    foreach (@{ $f2_aref }) {
        say sprintf '%s -> %s', $_->{'Key'}, $_->{'Val'};
    }

#     v1 -> v2
#     v3 -> v4
#     v5 -> v6
#     v7 -> v8
}
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1  
Why are you using sprintf instead of string interpolation? Also, this code won't run. You need to use the feature pragma or say use 5.12; (in which case you don't need the use strict; anymore) to use the say function. –  Chas. Owens Sep 3 '10 at 15:34
    
@Chas. Owens: I think you mean use 5.012; sprintf often makes for clearer code than interpolation. –  ysth Sep 3 '10 at 15:51
    
Because it's (subjective) better style. Some references won't interpolate (easily, that is, yes I know the ref-deref trick), and it's really dumb to waste any brain power to decide such trivialities whether I can use it or not, when a construct such as sprintf, OTOH, always works. ― I added use 5.010;. Now kindly remove your downvote. –  daxim Sep 3 '10 at 15:56
    
@ysth Yes, I do. –  Chas. Owens Sep 3 '10 at 17:00
1  
@drewk Again, who uses the system version of Perl? That stuff is toxic. I use OS X as well and am running 5.12. Take a look at perlbrew. It and cpanminus incredibly easy to manage a custom build. When I say I am running 5.12, I really mean I am running 5.10.1, 5.12.1, and 5.13.4 (all managed by perlbrew), but I use 5.12 the most. –  Chas. Owens Sep 3 '10 at 19:08

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