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Good morning all,

I'm searching for a very fast binary serialization technique for c++. I only need to serialize data contained in objects (no pointers etc.). I'd like it to be as fast as possible. If it's specific to x86 hardware that's acceptable.

I'm familiar with the C methods of doing this. As a test I've bench marked a couple of techniques. I've found the C method is 40% faster than the best C++ method I implemented.

Any suggestions on how to improve the C++ method (or libraries that do this)? Anything good available for memory mapped files?

Thanks

// c style writes
{
   #pragma pack(1)
   struct item
   {
      uint64_t off;
      uint32_t size;
   } data;
   #pragma pack

   clock_t start = clock();

   FILE* fd = fopen( "test.c.dat", "wb" );
   for ( long i = 0; i < tests; i++ )
   {
      data.off = i;
      data.size = i & 0xFFFF;
      fwrite( (char*) &data, sizeof(data), 1, fd );
   }
   fclose( fd );

   clock_t stop = clock();

   double d = ((double)(stop-start))/ CLOCKS_PER_SEC;
   printf( "%8.3f seconds\n", d );
}

About 1.6 seconds for tests = 10000000

// c++ style ofstream writes

// define a DTO class
class test
{
public:
   test(){}

   uint64_t off;
   uint32_t size;

   friend std::ostream& operator<<( std::ostream& stream, const test& v );
};

// write to the stream
std::ostream& operator<<( std::ostream &stream,  const test& v )
{
   stream.write( (char*)&v.off, sizeof(v.off) );
   stream.write( (char*)&v.size, sizeof(v.size) );
   return stream;
}

{
   test data;

   clock_t start = clock();

   std::ofstream out;
   out.open( "test.cpp.dat", std::ios::out | std::ios::trunc | std::ios::binary );
   for ( long i = 0; i < tests; i++ )
   {
      data.off = i;
      data.size = i & 0xFFFF;
      out << data;
   }
   out.close();

   clock_t stop = clock();

   double d = ((double)(stop-start))/ CLOCKS_PER_SEC;
   printf( "%8.3f seconds\n", d );
}

About 2.6 seconds for tests = 10000000

share|improve this question
8  
This is not serialization, it's a memory dump. It doesn't work if the memory layout of your objects change, or if you pass from a big-endian to a little-endian platform. –  Matthieu M. Sep 3 '10 at 16:23
1  
That's not equal code. In operator<< you should just << v.off/v.size and not do what you have done. You also didn't pack the test class, nor did you truncate the file in C, and in C++ you made two write calls, one for each member, whereas in C you wrote the whole structure at once. –  DeadMG Sep 3 '10 at 16:49
1  
@Matthieu: (from Wikipedia) Serialization: "serialization is the process of converting a data structure or object into a sequence of bits so that it can be stored in a file or memory buffer". Seems to qualify using that definition. I don't really need to worry about interoperability between different architectures. –  Jay Sep 3 '10 at 17:59
1  
@Dead: You don't need to pack the class since the members are written separately. Using C++ can I use the class the same way as I used the C struct? –  Jay Sep 3 '10 at 18:01
1  
@Paul: "C++ streams are quite slow." - but not in the case. The C++ implementation is clearly subpar in the case but should perform just as good as the C variant. It might be also due to different default buffering settings in iostream vs. stdio. –  Dummy00001 Sep 3 '10 at 22:48
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8 Answers

If the task to be performed is really serialization you might check out Google's Protocol Buffers. They provide fast serialization of C++ classes. The site also mentions some alternative libraries e.g. boost.serialization (only to state that protocol buffers outperform them in most cases, of course ;-)

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1  
Protocol Buffers (as much as I love it) is not really Serialization, it is more meant for message passing. The difference is that for protocol buffer you define a Message class while in serialization there is no intermediary representation. –  Matthieu M. Sep 3 '10 at 18:17
    
Thinking a bit more about it, you could use the protobuf class to hold on your data within the real class, this way you would be able to use protobuf for data keeping and encoding/decoding while hiding this fact from your users. –  Matthieu M. Sep 4 '10 at 15:27
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There are just very few real-life cases where that matters at all. You only ever serialize to make your objects compatible with some kind of external resource. Disk, network, etcetera. The code that transmits the serialized data on the resource is always orders of magnitude slower then the code needed to serialize the object. If you make the serialization code twice as fast, you've made the overall operation no more than 0.5% faster, give or take. That is worth neither the risk nor the effort.

Measure three times, cut once.

share|improve this answer
    
Excellent point. Thanks –  Jay Sep 3 '10 at 18:05
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The C++ Middleware Writer is an online alternative to serialization libraries. In some cases it is faster than the serialization library in Boost.

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Thanks. I'll look at that –  Jay Sep 2 '12 at 21:53
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Well, if you want the fastest serialization possible, then you can just write your own serialization class and give it methods to serialize each of the POD types.

The less safety you bring in, the faster it'll run and the harder it'll be to debug, however there is only a fixed number of built-in, so you could enumerate them.

class Buffer
{
public:
  inline Buffer& operator<<(int i); // etc...
private:
  std::deque<unsigned char> mData;
};

I must admit I don't understand your problem:

  • What do you actually want to do with the serialized message ?
  • Are you saving it for later ?
  • Do you have to worry about forward / backward compatibility ?

There might be better approaches that serialization.

share|improve this answer
    
I will be persisting the data to disk. It will only be loaded on the same machine it's save on. I was considering putting a version number on the objects so it would be better able to deal with changes. If you know better approaches I'd be happy to hear about them. –  Jay Sep 3 '10 at 18:58
    
Versioning is a must, otherwise you're stucked. You can how much you version though, because versioning every single struct will make things a bit more costy and having a single version isn't that easy to maintain. I would also suggest using some 'sync' markers from place to place and perhaps a CRC code to check data integrity (in case the file gets corrupted). I've commented on Thorsten77's answer about protobuf, it looks like it could help you alot. –  Matthieu M. Sep 4 '10 at 15:28
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Is there any way you can take advantage of things that stay the same?

I mean, you are just trying to run through "test.c.dat" as fast as you possibly can, right? Can you take advantage of the fact that the file does not change between your serialization attempts? If you are trying to serialize the same file, over and over again, you can optimize based on this. I can make the first serialization attempt take the same amount of time as yours, plus a tiny bit extra for another check, and then if you try and run the serialization again on the same input, I can make my second run go much faster than the first time.

I understand that this may just be a carefully crafted example, but you seem to be focused on making the language accomplish your task as quickly as possible, instead of asking the question of "do I need to accomplish this again?" What is the context of this approach?

I hope this is helpful.

-Brian J. Stinar-

share|improve this answer
    
It's going to be used as a configuration database. The code I wrote was simply to test the overhead of the methods. Good idea though. –  Jay Sep 3 '10 at 16:23
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If you're on a Unix system, mmap on the file is the way to do what you want to do.

See http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/aa366556(VS.85).aspx for an equivalent on windows.

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That was next on my list. Thanks for the confirmation –  Jay Sep 3 '10 at 18:11
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A lot of the performance is going to depend on memory buffers and how you fill up blocks of memory before writing to disk. And there are some tricks to making standard c++ streams a little faster, like std::ios_base::sync_with_stdio (false);

But IMHO, the world doesn't need another implementation of serialization. Here are some that other folks maintain that you might want to look into:

  • Boost: Fast, assorted C++ library including serialization
  • protobuf: Fast cross-platform, cross-language serialization with C++ module
  • thrift: Flexible cross-platform, cross-language serialization with C++ module
share|improve this answer
5  
Show me a serialization package that is useful in a constrained environment with deterministic memory usage and I'll show you the only serialization package you will ever need. Until then, it's a bit specious to say that we don't need another serialization package when everyone's requirements for serialization in contradictory ways. –  MSN Sep 3 '10 at 16:53
    
I looked at boost. It jumps through all kinds of hoops to serialize any object and I only need POD's. Why pay for extra that you don't need? –  Jay Sep 3 '10 at 18:10
1  
@Jay: If you only need support for POD's, why not just use your C approach? –  jalf Sep 3 '10 at 22:18
    
I was hoping someone here had thought of something I didn't :( –  Jay Sep 4 '10 at 1:50
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Both your C and your C++ code will probably be dominated (in time) by file I/O. I would recommend using memory mapped files when writing your data and leave the I/O buffering to the operating system. Boost.Interprocess could be an alternative.

share|improve this answer
    
memory mapped files is very specific to the operating system. –  Jay Sep 2 '12 at 21:51
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