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I am looking for an HTTP traffic monitor/sniffer (something like Firefox's HttpFox) for Google Chrome, for debugging/development purposes. It is the only thing preventing me from switching entirely to Chrome for web development.

Is there one?

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Not an answer, but I tend to use a HTTP proxy such as Fiddler, fiddler2.com/fiddler2, for this kind of task. This way, I am able to see all requests made, regardless of browser, and it can run in the background, collecting data for later study. –  driis Sep 3 '10 at 17:15
    
@driis what about HTTPS? –  Hackeron Nov 25 '10 at 0:28
    
Fiddler also supports HTTPS. –  driis Nov 25 '10 at 8:11
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6 Answers

up vote 18 down vote accepted

There is limited support in Chrome's built-in "Developer Tools" panel (Resources tab). However if you want a true monitor I'd go with a proxy such as Fiddler2 or Charles Proxy.

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The equivalent of the Firefox HTTPFox extension (and more) can be found in the "network" panel of Chrome's developer tools. It's bundled with Chrome by default:

https://developers.google.com/chrome-developer-tools/docs/network

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The problem with the developer tools window is that it is only used for the currently opened tab. It doesn't work across all opened web pages across all the Chrome tabs. Therefore, the "network" panel only detects http connections on the current tab and not any newly opened web pages in a new tab/window. This is actually probably due to the fact that Chrome was architecturally built differently than Firefox where each Chrome tab is a separate process. –  onejigtwojig Aug 27 '12 at 18:46
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Use a packet sniffer like wireshark. They are very easy to use if you know at least the very basics of TCP/IP. You get almost exactly the same output as from "httpfox". Much easier than going through a proxy - works ALWAYS and the software is free and it's good to be able to use it anyway. And it's easy :-) - click on one of the lines for the captured HTTP conversation and use Wireshark's "Follow TCP Stream" function to let it assemble and display the full stream. Okay, https is out with this approach.

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Unless you have any other application generating network traffic besides the browser –  matteo Nov 21 '11 at 1:01
    
Where is the problem? Never used any filters? Of course no one wants to always log ALL traffic on a modern network connected computer when they are interested in something specific. Excuse me for assuming that this is obvious :-) –  Mörre Nov 21 '11 at 9:37
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Charles Web Proxy is an excellent answer: cross-platform (Windows, Mac, Linux) and browser-independent (it runs as a separate process, capturing traffic going to/from your browsers). I see where Mörre is going with Wireshark, but it's a lot of work to get it set up and running properly, especially on a Mac (where, if you don't already have X11 installed properly, you will never, ever get it to work). Charles takes all of 5 minutes to install, set up and understand.

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Bummer, Flddler2 looks good, but its Windows only. HttpFox is cross platform, which is key for me.

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wireshark wont be able to decrypt https packets. May not work with localhost in windows.

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I think this should be a comment, not an answer –  Smith Nov 24 '11 at 12:25
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