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im trying to send a message between 2 separate projects, but my problem is that im trying to make the receiver run inside a TThread Object, but WndProc wont work from inside an Object, must be a function, is there anyway to create a window inside a TThread that can process messages inside the thread?

here is what i mean

function TDataThread.WindowProc(hwnd: HWND; uMsg: UINT; wParam: WPARAM; lParam: LPARAM): LRESULT; stdcall;
begin
 Result := 0;
 case uMsg of
   WM_DATA_AVA: MessageBox(0, 'Data Avaibale', 'Test', 0);
  else Result := DefWindowProc(hwnd, uMsg, wParam, lParam);
 end;
end;

Procedure TDataThread.Create(const Title:String);
begin
 HAppInstance := HInstance;
 with WndClass do
 begin
  Style := 0;
  lpfnWndProc := @WindowProc;          //The Error Lies here (Variable Required)
  cbClsExtra := 0;
  cbWndExtra := 0;
  hInstance := HAppInstance;
  hIcon := 0;
  hCursor := LoadCursor(0, IDC_ARROW);
  hbrBackground := COLOR_WINDOW;
  lpszMenuName := nil;
  lpszClassName := 'TDataForm';
 end;
 Windows.RegisterClass(WndClass);
 MainForm := CreateWindow('TDataForm', PAnsiChar(Title), WS_DLGFRAME , XPos, YPos, 698, 517, 0, 0, hInstance, nil);
end;

i need to have a form so i can get its handle from another application Using FindWindow and FindWindowEx if needed

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5 Answers 5

Running a wndproc in a background thread can be done in Win32, but it's widely regarded as a bad idea.

To do it, you must ensure that your background thread contains a message dispatch loop: GetMessage/TranslateMessage/DispatchMessage. You must ensure that the window handle you want to process messages in the background thread is created on the background thread (CreateWindow is called in the context of the background thread) and all its child windows as well. And you must ensure that your background thread calls its message loop frequently in addition to whatever else it's doing (which kinda defeats the purpose of using a background thread!)

If your background thread doesn't have a message loop, the window handles that are created on the background thread will never receive any messages, so nothing will happen.

Now then, why you shouldn't do this: Windows are message-driven, which means they are inherently a cooperatively multitasked dispatch system. Every GUI windows app has to have a message loop in the main thread to get anything done. That message loop will support virtually any number of windows, all on the main thread. A properly implemented UI will not do anything in the main thread to block execution, so the message loop will always be ready and responsive.

So if the existing message loop on the main thread will handle all your window messaging needs without blocking or freezing, why would you want to make your life more complicated by trying to run a second message loop in a background thread? There is no advantage to using a background thread.

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1  
As suggestion, let the main thread get the message and signal your working thread when there's new data available to process. –  jachguate Sep 3 '10 at 21:30
    
All threads in Windows are equal, there's nothing "main" or "background" about them. They differ in whether they have a message loop or not, and there is one that was created first in a process, but that's about it as far as differences go. Interaction with COM may require a thread to have a message loop, working with windows in a thread requires it to have a message loop. A message loop is also a fine way to communicate with a thread. Apart from the VCL being a bad match for it there's nothing wrong with multiple message loops in a process. –  mghie Sep 3 '10 at 22:09
    
so there is no way i can make my thread communicate with other processes? since each process must send back a reply to its thread to show that its ready to map a file for data ! –  killercode Sep 3 '10 at 23:11
1  
Since you mention the other process sending back a reply to indicate data is ready, you could also consider using a named mutex per process/thread pair. The thread starts the process, passing the name of the mutex as a param, then the thread blocks waiting for the mutex to signal. The process gets the named mutex and signals it when the work is done. No message loops required. (This assumes you have control of the source code for the process as well as the thread) –  dthorpe Sep 3 '10 at 23:31
1  
@mghie: Yes, all threads in Windows are equal. All programmers, however, are not. If there is a solution that will get the job done without extensive use of threads, use it. If there is a solution that can get the job done without using thread-bound window handles, background threads, and COM in the same sentence, even better. People are drawn to threads like moths to flame, with similar results. –  dthorpe Sep 3 '10 at 23:36

Creating a window inside a TThread works fine, provided the TThread implements a message loop, AND CreateWindow() is called inside the same thread context as the message loop. In other words, you must call CreateWindow() from inside the TThread's Execute() method, NOT from inside its constructor, eg:

type
  TDataThread = class(TThread)
  private
    FTitle: String;
    FWnd: HWND;
    FWndClass: WNDCLASS;
  protected
    procedure Execute; override;
    procedure DoTerminate; override;
  public
    constructor Create(const Title:String); reintroduce;
  end;

constructor TDataThread.Create(const Title:String); 
begin 
  inherited Create(False);
  FTitle := Title;
  with FWndClass do 
  begin 
    Style := 0; 
    lpfnWndProc := @DefWindowProc;
    cbClsExtra := 0; 
    cbWndExtra := 0; 
    hInstance := HInstance; 
    hIcon := 0; 
    hCursor := LoadCursor(0, IDC_ARROW); 
    hbrBackground := COLOR_WINDOW; 
    lpszMenuName := nil; 
    lpszClassName := 'TDataForm'; 
  end; 
end; 

procedure TDataThread.Execute; 
var
  Msg: TMsg;
begin
  if Windows.RegisterClass(FWndClass) = 0 then Exit;
  FWnd := CreateWindow(FWndClass.lpszClassName, PChar(FTitle), WS_DLGFRAME, XPos, YPos, 698, 517, 0, 0, HInstance, nil); 
  if FWnd = 0 then Exit;
  while GetMessage(Msg, FWnd, 0, 0) > 0 do
  begin
    if Msg.message = WM_DATA_AVA then begin
      MessageBox(0, 'Data Available', 'Test', 0);
    end else
    begin
      TranslateMessage(msg);
      DispatchMessage(msg)
    end;
  end;
end;

procedure TDataThread.DoTerminate;
begin
  if FWnd <> 0 then DestroyWindow(FWnd);
  Windows.UnregisterClass(FWndClass);
  inherited;
end;
share|improve this answer
    
+1, this is the important technical information from dthorpe's answer, which was a little buried in caveats. There's no need to have a member FWndClass though, put everything into Execute(), get rid of DoTerminate(), and things will be clearer. If both class name and window title were parameters to the constructor this would make for a nice helper base class. –  mghie Sep 7 '10 at 20:50
    
I prefer to use DoTerminate() because it allows the thread to cleanup after itself regardless of whether Execute() exits cleanly or due to an uncaught exception. Putting a try/except around the entire Execute() code is a bit ugly for me. –  Remy Lebeau Sep 7 '10 at 21:25
    
Artificially putting setup, use of and destruction of a data structure into different methods is much worse. Your code for example will happily call UnregisterClass() even if RegisterClass() has failed. –  mghie Sep 7 '10 at 21:53
    
Which is why I would normally add a check to make sure it was registered before unregistering it. This was merely an example. –  Remy Lebeau Sep 8 '10 at 0:48

You don't need a Window to receive messages, try the following. In the thread (once) make a call to PeekMessage to force the creation of a Message Queue, example:

  // Force Message Queue Creation
  PeekMessage(Msg, 0, WM_USER, WM_USER, PM_NOREMOVE);

Then setup a Message Loop/Pump, example:

  // Run until terminated
  while not Terminated do
  begin

    if GetMessage(@Msg, 0, 0, 0) then
    begin
      case Msg.message of
        WM_DATA_AV: MessageBox(0, 'Data Avaibale', 'Test', 0); 
      else begin
        TranslateMessage(@Msg);
        DispatchMessage(@Msg);
      end;
    end;
  end;
share|improve this answer
    
yea, but how am i gonna know the handle of this thread to send messages to? since the sender is from another process –  killercode Sep 3 '10 at 23:11
    
Use PostThreadMessage (msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms644946(VS.85).aspx), it takes the ThreadId instead of a Window Handle. –  Remko Sep 4 '10 at 6:21
1  
But then you have the problem of the sending app needing to locate the receiving thread's ID. Using a window makes that search easier. –  Remy Lebeau Sep 7 '10 at 20:21

I dont think you can do what you are trying to do. The user interface runs from the main thread. Why are you doing this?

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TTestLoopThread = class(TThread)
      private
        FWinHandle: HWND;
        procedure DeallocateHWnd(Wnd: HWND);
      protected
        procedure Execute; override;
        procedure WndProc(var msg: TMessage);
      public
        constructor Create;
        destructor Destroy; override;
      end;

    implementation

    var
      WM_SHUTDOWN_THREADS: Cardinal;

    procedure TForm1.FormCreate(Sender: TObject);
    begin
      WM_SHUTDOWN_THREADS := RegisterWindowMessage('TVS_Threads');
    end;

    procedure TForm1.Button1Click(Sender: TObject);
    begin
      TTestLoopThread.Create;
    end;

    procedure TForm1.Button2Click(Sender: TObject);
    begin
      SendMessage(wnd_broadcast, WM_SHUTDOWN_THREADS, 0, 0);
    end;

    { TTestLoopThread }

    constructor TTestLoopThread.Create;
    begin
      inherited Create(False);
    end;

    destructor TTestLoopThread.Destroy;
    begin
      inherited;
    end;

    procedure TTestLoopThread.DeallocateHWnd(Wnd: HWND);
    var
      Instance: Pointer;
    begin
      Instance := Pointer(GetWindowLong(Wnd, GWL_WNDPROC));
      if Instance <> @DefWindowProc then
        // make sure we restore the old, original windows procedure before leaving
        SetWindowLong(Wnd, GWL_WNDPROC, Longint(@DefWindowProc));
      FreeObjectInstance(Instance);
      DestroyWindow(Wnd);
    end;

    procedure TTestLoopThread.Execute;
    var
      Msg: TMsg;
    begin
      FreeOnTerminate := True;
      FWinHandle := AllocateHWND(WndProc); //Inside Thread
      try
      while GetMessage(Msg, 0, 0, 0) do
        begin
         TranslateMessage(Msg);
         DispatchMessage(Msg);
        end;
      finally
      DeallocateHWND(FWinHandle);
      end;
    end;

    procedure TTestLoopThread.WndProc(var msg: TMessage);
    begin
      if Msg.Msg = WM_SHUTDOWN_THREADS then
      begin
       Form1.Memo1.Lines.Add('Thread ' + IntToStr(ThreadID) + ' shutting down.');
       PostMessage(FWinHandle, WM_QUIT, 0, 0);
      end
      else
       Msg.Result := DefWindowProc(FWinHandle, Msg.Msg, Msg.wParam, Msg.lParam);
    end;
share|improve this answer
    
AlocateHWND(), DeallocateHWND(), MakeObjectInstance(), FreeObjectInstance() - these functions are NOT thread-safe, as they use global resources that are not protected from concurrent access across threads. The main thread makes fairly extensive use of these functions, so unsafe worker threads that also use them can really mess them up. That being said, there are third-party custom implementations floating around that are thread-safe. Otherwise, don't use them at all, and just use Win32 API function calls directly (CreateWindow(), SetWindowLong()) which work fine in worker threads. –  Remy Lebeau Aug 5 '13 at 22:42

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