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What's the most efficient way to convert a Dictionary to a formatted string.

e.g.:

My method:

public string DictToString(Dictionary<string, string> items, string format){

    format = String.IsNullOrEmpty(format) ? "{0}='{1}' " : format;

    string itemString = "";
    foreach(var item in items){
        itemString = itemString + String.Format(format,item.Key,item.Value);
    }

    return itemString;
}

Is there a better/more concise/more efficient way?

Note: the Dictionary will have at most 10 items and I'm not committed to using it if another similar "key-value pair" object type exists

Also, since I'm returning strings anyhow, what would a generic version look like?

share|improve this question
1  
I think that's pretty efficient; just change it to use a StringBuilder instead string concatenation and you should be set. – Gabe Sep 3 '10 at 19:51
up vote 18 down vote accepted

I just rewrote your version to be a bit more generic and use StringBuilder:

public string DictToString<T, V>(IEnumerable<KeyValuePair<T, V>> items, string format)
{
    format = String.IsNullOrEmpty(format) ? "{0}='{1}' " : format; 

    StringBuilder itemString = new StringBuilder();
    foreach(var item in items)
        itemString.AppendFormat(format, item.Key, item.Value);

    return itemString.ToString(); 
}
share|improve this answer
    
This won't work as you think - IDictionary<string, string> is not compatible with IDictionary<string, object> - you could make the value generic however. – Lee Sep 3 '10 at 20:02
    
Lee: How about now? – Gabe Sep 3 '10 at 20:11
    
This will work without problems – abatishchev Sep 3 '10 at 20:28
    
That looks fine, +1 for using IEnumerable<T>. – Lee Sep 3 '10 at 20:44
public string DictToString<TKey, TValue>(Dictionary<TKey, TValue> items, string format)
{
    format = String.IsNullOrEmpty(format) ? "{0}='{1}' " : format;
    return items.Aggregate(new StringBuilder(), (sb, kvp) => sb.AppendFormat(format, kvp.Key, kvp.Value)).ToString();
}
share|improve this answer
    
I think you can use IDictionary – abatishchev Sep 3 '10 at 20:23

This method

public static string ToFormattedString<TKey, TValue>(this IDictionary<TKey, TValue> dic, string format, string separator)
{
    return String.Join(
        !String.IsNullOrEmpty(separator) ? separator : " ",
        dic.Select(p => String.Format(
            !String.IsNullOrEmpty(format) ? format : "{0}='{1}'",
            p.Key, p.Value)));
}

used next way:

dic.ToFormattedString(null, null); // default format and separator

will convert

new Dictionary<string, string>
{
    { "a", "1" },
    { "b", "2" }
};

to

a='1' b='2'

or

dic.ToFormattedString("{0}={1}", ", ")

to

a=1, b=2

Don't forget an overload:

public static string ToFormattedString<TKey, TValue>(this IDictionary<TKey, TValue> dic)
{
    return dic.ToFormattedString(null, null);
}

You can use generic TKey/TValue because any object has ToString() which will be used by String.Format().

And as far as IDictionary<TKey, TValue> is IEnumerable<KeyValuePair<TKey, TValue>> you can use any. I prefer IDictionary for more code expressiveness.

share|improve this answer

I think efficiency is hardly a concern with only 10 strings, but maybe you don't want to rely on it only being ten.

Concatenation of Strings creates a new String object in memory, since String objects are immutable. This also suggest other String operations may create new instances, like replace. Usually this is avoided by using StringBuilder.

StringBuilder avoids this by using a buffer which it operates on; when the value of the StringBuilder is concatenated with another String the contents are added to the end of the buffer.

However there are caveats, see this paragraph:

Performance considerations

[...]

The performance of a concatenation operation for a String or StringBuilder object depends on how often a memory allocation occurs. A String concatenation operation always allocates memory, whereas a StringBuilder concatenation operation only allocates memory if the StringBuilder object buffer is too small to accommodate the new data. Consequently, the String class is preferable for a concatenation operation if a fixed number of String objects are concatenated. In that case, the individual concatenation operations might even be combined into a single operation by the compiler. A StringBuilder object is preferable for a concatenation operation if an arbitrary number of strings are concatenated; for example, if a loop concatenates a random number of strings of user input.

So a (contrived) case like this should probably not be replaced with StringBuilder:

string addressLine0 = Person.Street.Name +  " " + Person.Street.Number + " Floor " + Person.Street.Floor;

...as the compiler might be able to reduce this to a more efficient form. It is also highly debatable if it would inefficient enough to matter in the greater scheme of things.

Following Microsoft's recommendations you probably want to use StringBuilder instead (like the other highly adequate answers show.)

share|improve this answer
1  
Nitpick: The fact that string concatenation using the + operator creates new string objects in memory is actually unrelated to the fact that the string type is immutable (though both are true). – Dan Tao Sep 3 '10 at 21:13
    
@Dan Tao: I'm a bit thick at the moment, could you elaborate on why? It seems String + String operations get special treatment from the compiler, does this have anything to do with it? – Skurmedel Sep 3 '10 at 21:28
    
@Skurmedal: So, the + operator is static, takes two arguments, and returns a new value. You could think of it, really, as a static method. Now, just because a method accepts two arguments and returns a new value does not imply that the type of the arguments is immutable. I could Concat two List<T> objects together to get a new IEnumerable<T> without affecting either List<T>; this wouldn't be because List<T> is immutable (it's not). It would just be the way Concat works. So even though string is immutable, it could just as easily not be -- as far as concatenation is concerned. – Dan Tao Sep 3 '10 at 21:46
    
@Skurmedal: To put it another way: any time I write x = y + z; I am assigning a new value to the variable x. This is unrelated to whether x's type is immutable. Immutable type or not, assigning a new value is always going to change what's stored in a variable. So x = y + z; is going to change what's at x, no question. What's really weird to think about is that if the type were mutable, then you could conceivably write the statement x = y + z; and actually change the value of y or z (or both!) -- if the + operator for that type were defined to do so. – Dan Tao Sep 3 '10 at 21:56

Gabe, if you are going to be generic, be generic:

public string DictToString<T>(IDictionary<string, T> items, string format) 
{ 
    format = String.IsNullOrEmpty(format) ? "{0}='{1}' " : format;  

    StringBuilder itemString = new StringBuilder(); 
    foreach(var item in items) 
        itemString.AppendFormat(format, item.Key, item.Value); 

    return itemString.ToString();  
} 
share|improve this answer
    
I originally meant generic in the "uses IDictionary instead of Dictionary" sense, but I was already doing what you suggested as you posted yours. – Gabe Sep 3 '10 at 20:03
    
@Gabe: The thing is I don't think you can pass a Dictionary<string, string> as a IDictionary<string,object> – James Curran Sep 3 '10 at 20:05
    
You're right; I just posted before I was really done writing the damn thing. – Gabe Sep 3 '10 at 20:07
    
@Gabe: The hazards of FGITW. – James Curran Sep 3 '10 at 20:20
    
@Gabe, @James: StringBuilder has next overload: AppendFormat(string, object, object) so you can use both generic - key and value – abatishchev Sep 3 '10 at 20:27

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